Andrew Clements

Troublemaker

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<b>Once a troublemaker, always a troublemaker? A reputation proves challenging to change in this &quot;rock-solid school story&quot; (<i>Publishers Weekly</i>) from Andrew Clements.</b> <p></p>Clayton Hensley is accustomed to trouble: There's a folder of incident reports in Principal Kelling's office that's as thick as a phonebook and growing daily. Most recently, Clay's art teacher told the class to spend the period drawing anything they wanted, and Clay decided to be extra &quot;creative&quot; by drawing a spot-on portrait of Principal Kelling...as a donkey. <p></p>It's a pretty funny joke, but Clay is coming to realize that the biggest joke of all may be on him. When his big brother, Mitchell, gets in some serious trouble, Clay decides to change his own mischief-making ways...but he can't seem to shake his reputation as a troublemaker. <p></p>From the master of the school story comes a book about the fine line between good-humored mischief and dangerous behavior--and how everyday choices can close or open doors.

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Once a troublemaker, always a troublemaker? A reputation proves challenging to change in this "rock-solid school story" (Publishers Weekly) from Andrew Clements.

Clayton Hensley is accustomed to trouble: There's a folder of incident reports in Principal Kelling's office that's as thick as a phonebook and growing daily. Most recently, Clay's art teacher told the class to spend the period drawing anything they wanted, and Clay decided to be extra "creative" by drawing a spot-on portrait of Principal Kelling...as a donkey.

It's a pretty funny joke, but Clay is coming to realize that the biggest joke of all may be on him. When his big brother, Mitchell, gets in some serious trouble, Clay decides to change his own mischief-making ways...but he can't seem to shake his reputation as a troublemaker.

From the master of the school story comes a book about the fine line between good-humored mischief and dangerous behavior--and how everyday choices can close or open doors.Once a troublemaker, always a troublemaker? A reputation proves challenging to change in this “rock-solid school story” (Publishers Weekly) from Andrew Clements.

Clayton Hensley is accustomed to trouble: There’s a folder of incident reports in Principal Kelling’s office that’s as thick as a phonebook and growing daily. Most recently, Clay’s art teacher told the class to spend the period drawing anything they wanted, and Clay decided to be extra “creative” by drawing a spot-on portrait of Principal Kelling…as a donkey.

It’s a pretty funny joke, but Clay is coming to realize that the biggest joke of all may be on him. When his big brother, Mitchell, gets in some serious trouble, Clay decides to change his own mischief-making ways…but he can’t seem to shake his reputation as a troublemaker.

From the master of the school story comes a book about the fine line between good-humored mischief and dangerous behavior—and how everyday choices can close or open doors.

Specifications

Publisher
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
176
Author
Andrew Clements
ISBN-13
9781416949329
Publication Date
February, 2013
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
7.62 x 5.12 x 0.50 Inches
ISBN-10
1416949321

Customer Reviews

Average Rating:(3.5)out of 5 stars
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Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

From the inside flap: ...

From the inside flap: "Once a troublemaker, always a troublemaker? There's a folder in Principal Kelling's office that's as thick as a phone book, and it's growing daily. It's filled with the incident reports for every time Clayton Hensley broke the rules. There's the minor stuff, like running in the hallways and not being where he was supposed to be when he was supposed to be there. But then there are also reports, like the most recent addition, that show Clay's own brand of troublemaking: The art teacher had said tha the class should spend the period drawing anything they wanted, and Clay decided to be extra "creative" by drawing a spot-on portrait of Principal Kelling . . . as a donkey. It's a pretty funny joke, but Clay is coming to realize that the biggest joke all may be on him. When his big brother, Mitchell, gets in some serious trouble, Clay decides to change his own mischief-making ways . . . but he can't seem to shake his reputation as a troublemaker." Clay is one of those students "who is not living up to his potential." He idolizes his older brother and wants to follow in his mischievous footsteps. At first I worried that this book might be a "bad influence" by giving kids ideas for making trouble (and it does, but nothing a mischievous child hasn't already thought of). But it also sets a good, if someone simplistic example. Clay's admiration for his older brother Mitch may get him into to trouble in the beginning, but it also puts him on the right path to making better choices. What I liked about the book: It provides a good message in simple and humorous terms. The writing is typical Clements and will appeal to students and educators alike. Mark Elliott's illustrations have a feel as though they were done by a talented student, which will have great appeal for readers. What I don't like about the story: The message is a little oversimplified. Though I think the simplicity of the story makes it perfect for its targeted audience it might also give the impression that changing one's behavior can happen virtually overnight. It has the feel of an "after school special" where everything is solved in a couple of hours. Overall this is a good read and I recommend it for Clements fans and anyone who wants to impart a message about how your choices tend to follow you. Recommended for 3rd grade and up. Mrs. Archer's rating: 4 of 5

Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Meet Clay, who absolut...

Meet Clay, who absolutely idolizes his older brother, Mitch. Everything Clay does, from drawing a funny-mean picture of the principal to ducking his office disciplinary meetings, he has only one thought in his head, "Man, I can't wait to laugh about this with Mitch." But he'll have to wait a little longer, because Mitch is in jail. And when Mitch gets home, he has some ideas about how Clay should live his life from now on. But no matter what Clay does, he can't seem to escape his bad reputation (cue electric guitars). I'm not familiar with Andrew Clements, but apparently he wrote a bestseller called Frindle. Based on this book, I'm willing to check that one out. The age group of the kids in this story is sixth grade, making it perfect for 7th graders who might miss sixth grade life, or fifth graders looking ahead. While the book packs a pretty powerful message about the joys of staying out of trouble, kids with real disciplinary issues might find it a little hokey. But if you've got a sweet goofball, this might be the book for them. For middle schoolers, the print is pretty large, and some of your kids might dismiss it as childish as a result, and I hate to say it, but the cover is really unattractive. Still, that's why we don't judge books by their covers, right? (I totally do...) Anyways, good book for struggling readers, kids who are silly, or kids looking for a fast-paced read who don't really dig the fantasy thing. Decent writing, relatable characters, and a believable plot add up to a nice little read for middle schoolers. The only part I had trouble with is when the characters, as 5th graders, snuck out of the house at 1:00 am to smash pumpkins on Halloween. But then, I am, and always have been, a serious goody-goody. For 5th - 8th graders

Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Great school story tol...

Great school story told about a wise-crack who is compelled by his older brother to change his ways, before it's too late. Boys in the 5th and 6th grades who think that there aren't any books to appeal to them will devour this newest offering from the author of Frindle.This book also marks #30 out of #30 for me on Vermont's DCF list 2012-13. Goal to read all 30 ... completed!

Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars

I have very mixed feel...

I have very mixed feelings about this book. At the beginning of the book, it seems like Clay is only acting out to impress his older brother. Initially, Clay turns himself around for his brother also, but he soon realizes that the change is a positive one for him as well. On one hand, I love that this is a story of living for you and not to impress others. On the other hand, this also seems like a story intended to scare kids into behaving, which I do not really like. This books shows that some school rules are silly, but that kids must suck it up and endure them or end up a delinquent. I like books that advocate creativity, not blind obedience.


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