Delivering to
Generated at Tue, 15 Oct 2019 02:47:50 GMT exp-ck: 1NVuX13wJD715kL9u1Acxdr1HrmRC3SJi9U1Veu_B1WvJhK1ZbZEW1bJ8Qe1fj-AU1gZv-U2iPdrb1lpE3v1r3M9y1rcCpW1rgxjp1u1ISE1wU3zF1; xpa: 1NVuX|3wJD7|5kL9u|Acxdr|HrmRC|SJi9U|Veu_B|WvJhK|ZbZEW|bJ8Qe|fj-AU|gZv-U|iPdrb|lpE3v|r3M9y|rcCpW|rgxjp|u1ISE|wU3zF;
Electrode, Comp-814101315, DC-prod-az-southcentralus-17, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-19.1.25, SHA-281b3c57e12f0605c055c6c315a277125270a403, CID-54b0ce0c-028-16dcd50888f9f6, Generated: Tue, 15 Oct 2019 02:47:50 GMT

1984

Walmart # 569081638
$12.23$12.23
List Was $16.00
Free 2-day delivery on $35+ orders

Arrives by Thu, Oct 17

Free pickup Thu, Oct 17 + discount

Ships to San Leandro, 1919 Davis St

Sold & shipped byWalmart

Product Highlights

9780452262935

About This Item

We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it.
Satire on the possible horrors of a totalitarian regime in England in 1984. Written in 1948, 1984 was George Orwell’s chilling prophecy about the future. And while 1984 has come and gone, his dystopian vision of a government that will do anything to control the narrative is timelier than ever...

•Nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read•

The Party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command.

Winston Smith toes the Party line, rewriting history to satisfy the demands of the Ministry of Truth. With each lie he writes, Winston grows to hate the Party that seeks power for its own sake and persecutes those who dare to commit thoughtcrimes. But as he starts to think for himself, Winston can’t escape the fact that Big Brother is always watching...

A startling and haunting vision of the world, 1984 is so powerful that it is completely convincing from start to finish. No one can deny the influence of this novel, its hold on the imaginations of multiple generations of readers, or the resiliency of its admonitions—a legacy that seems only to grow with the passage of time.

Specifications

Publisher
Penguin Publishing Group
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
304
Author
George Orwell
ISBN-13
9780452262935
Publication Date
April, 1983
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
7.97 x 5.27 x 0.63 Inches
ISBN-10
0452262933

Customer Reviews

5 stars
240
4 stars
133
3 stars
65
2 stars
17
1 star
9
Most helpful positive review
7 customers found this helpful
Nineteen Eighty-Four i...
Nineteen Eighty-Four is a seminal work, maybe the most important work of fiction written in English in the twentieth century. Like its only real competitor for that title, The Lord of the Rings, it is both a work of outlandish fantasy while also having something truly profound to say about our own post-Second World War world. What I find most impressive about Orwell's vision of the future are both its prescience and its political neutrality. All the most chilling aspects of Big Brother's totalitarian government--constant electronic surveillance of its citizens, rewriting history to serve the political concerns of the day, the infiltration of society by secret police--are really just exaggerations (well, one hopes that they're exaggerations) of practices that our own Western democratic governments engage in today, and have been engaging in for the past two generations. And what's more, they're practices that have been followed by parties at either end of the political spectrum--by supposedly small-government Republican (American) and Conservative (British) governments just as much as by liberal Democrats (American) or socialist Labour (British). Orwell's dark vision sees society as a whole, not just one ideology or another. Orwell himself, of course, was extremely left-wing, to the point of actually advocating revolutionary overthrow of the existing capital order, and also of fighting on the Republican side during the Spanish Civil War. For much of the Second World War he remained convinced that the national effort required to beat the Axis Powers would necessarily place such a strain on the British social order that it was guaranteed to result in Communist revolution on the Leninist model. But his Communism was not we now think of as Communism, the Cold War Soviet state of faceless bureaucracy and rigid suppression of individuality. Instead, he sought through Communism--or what he called "democratic socialism"--the opportunity to achieve the profoundest freedom for the individual, by freeing him from the fetters of capitalism. And that philosophy infuses Nineteen Eighty-Four, and is probably the biggest reason why it remains such a powerful story today. For while it is a novel of the inexorable expansion of government at the expense of the individual, its central theme is the necessity for the individual to maintain constant vigilance for the preservation of freedom (which is not the same thing as democracy).
Most helpful negative review
2 customers found this helpful
Boring and impossible ...
Boring and impossible to like. A book for the kind of dreadful people who like to imagine that, of all the abuses and brutality a fascist state is capable of inflicting upon its population, they'd find distortion and control of the truth the worst - the street beatings, massive corruption and state approved murders would probably concern me more than the prospect of "being rehabilitated" and betraying the truth. Even ignoring this, 1984 is a dull novel that is so cluttered with ropey symbolism that it makes Animal Farm look subtle: The snow globe, the nookie in the woods, the rambling on about the measurement of beer and gin, all combine to form a picture of Orwell forever mashing his overly laboured point into a human face. The theme of human betrayal and Big Brother's corruptive influence on society that underpins much of the novel is just as awkward and clumsy as the devices through which it acts: where some art may be said to mimic life, 1984 is a mere caricature of the horrors of totalitarianism. Even so, at least it isn't Keep the Aspidistra Flying.
Most helpful positive review
7 customers found this helpful
Nineteen Eighty-Four i...
Nineteen Eighty-Four is a seminal work, maybe the most important work of fiction written in English in the twentieth century. Like its only real competitor for that title, The Lord of the Rings, it is both a work of outlandish fantasy while also having something truly profound to say about our own post-Second World War world. What I find most impressive about Orwell's vision of the future are both its prescience and its political neutrality. All the most chilling aspects of Big Brother's totalitarian government--constant electronic surveillance of its citizens, rewriting history to serve the political concerns of the day, the infiltration of society by secret police--are really just exaggerations (well, one hopes that they're exaggerations) of practices that our own Western democratic governments engage in today, and have been engaging in for the past two generations. And what's more, they're practices that have been followed by parties at either end of the political spectrum--by supposedly small-government Republican (American) and Conservative (British) governments just as much as by liberal Democrats (American) or socialist Labour (British). Orwell's dark vision sees society as a whole, not just one ideology or another. Orwell himself, of course, was extremely left-wing, to the point of actually advocating revolutionary overthrow of the existing capital order, and also of fighting on the Republican side during the Spanish Civil War. For much of the Second World War he remained convinced that the national effort required to beat the Axis Powers would necessarily place such a strain on the British social order that it was guaranteed to result in Communist revolution on the Leninist model. But his Communism was not we now think of as Communism, the Cold War Soviet state of faceless bureaucracy and rigid suppression of individuality. Instead, he sought through Communism--or what he called "democratic socialism"--the opportunity to achieve the profoundest freedom for the individual, by freeing him from the fetters of capitalism. And that philosophy infuses Nineteen Eighty-Four, and is probably the biggest reason why it remains such a powerful story today. For while it is a novel of the inexorable expansion of government at the expense of the individual, its central theme is the necessity for the individual to maintain constant vigilance for the preservation of freedom (which is not the same thing as democracy).
Most helpful negative review
2 customers found this helpful
Boring and impossible ...
Boring and impossible to like. A book for the kind of dreadful people who like to imagine that, of all the abuses and brutality a fascist state is capable of inflicting upon its population, they'd find distortion and control of the truth the worst - the street beatings, massive corruption and state approved murders would probably concern me more than the prospect of "being rehabilitated" and betraying the truth. Even ignoring this, 1984 is a dull novel that is so cluttered with ropey symbolism that it makes Animal Farm look subtle: The snow globe, the nookie in the woods, the rambling on about the measurement of beer and gin, all combine to form a picture of Orwell forever mashing his overly laboured point into a human face. The theme of human betrayal and Big Brother's corruptive influence on society that underpins much of the novel is just as awkward and clumsy as the devices through which it acts: where some art may be said to mimic life, 1984 is a mere caricature of the horrors of totalitarianism. Even so, at least it isn't Keep the Aspidistra Flying.
1-5 of 464 reviews

Were I ever to underta...

Were I ever to undertake the arduous task of listing my favorite novels, I am sure that Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) would make the list. On one level, Orwell gives us a fascinating look at a dystopian society and the struggles of the "last man" to resist. He also gives us a brief, but potent account of the power of love in the face of external pressure. Above all, however, Orwell gives us a meditation on power, and one that is haunting long after you read the book. Indeed, the novel is relatively light on action. The protagonist, Winston, is not the sort of person to lead armed rebellion or to race down alleys to escape the Thought Police. Instead, the book is mostly composed of Winston's descriptions and analysis of his society, and the thoughts of others. The latter portions of the book are dominated by chapters of a book Winston is reading (a book within a book), and the arguments of the major antagonist of the work. These passages do not ask us to believe in the society of Oceania, or believe that this is the course of human history. What they ask us to believe is a series of claims about power, most importantly, that power (a) comes from control of belief, (b) that external power can shape our even most strongly held internal beliefs and that (c) power is sought for the sake of power itself (among many other thought-provoking aspects which Orwell reflects upon). The former comes through most vividly in the form of (collective) solipsistic view that the Party favors. This is brought out explicitly in the scenes at the end of the book, wherein Winston is put under incredible pressure to accept it. The scenes I found most effective here, however, are in Winston's description of his daily work. His job is to correct history, to change every historical record to reflect the changing realities of the time. So if a party member has fallen into disrepute, it is Winston's job to show that he has always been in disrepute. If the enemy in the ongoing war changes, then it is Winston's job to show that the war has never changed. It is total information control, and Orwell masterfully illustrates the frightening possibility that one cannot rationally engage those who simply demand an ideological driven view of reality. It is hard to discuss the second without spoiling the ending of the novel. Allow me simply to say that the passage in Room 101 is among the most affecting in all of English literature. It is frightening, indeed, I find it more frightening than almost anything else I have ever read. We, like Winston, tend to think of ourselves in terms of certain relationships, and ideas that we will hold on to. My wife is that limit, and my feelings for her are something I could never yield, no matter the pressure. At least, this is my self-conception. Yet, Orwell (like social psychologists after him) cast this into doubt. Are none of our most dear, most sacred, most definitional beliefs, ideas and feelings safe from external pressure and one's own deep-seated need to save oneself? Is my self-conception really simply a sign that this commitment has simply never been tested hard enough? The third is most eloquently discussed in the final scenes of the book. When asked about why the Party rules as it does, Winston gives the answer he thinks is required of him, that the Party does it for the good of those who cannot rule themselves. Yet, with brutal frankness, the primary antagonist tells him that "The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power." This leads into perhaps the most famous passage from the novel: "But always-do not forget this Winston-always there will be the intoxication of power, constantly increasing and constantly growing subtler. Always, at every moment, there will be the thrill of victory, the sensation of trampling on an enemy who is helpless. If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face-forever." The individual who seeks power for the greater good (think of Plato's Republic) is one who can be reasoned with. If Plato is wrong that individuals who grasp the Good will, as a consequence, be motivated to do good things, he might be dissuaded of the idea that the few ought to rule. Orwell's ruler is far more frightening, for s/he rules for the sake of ruling, holding power for the sake of power. This is a position beyond reasoned argument, based purely on the intoxication of power. These are passages that will linger long after one finishes 1984. I cannot recommend this novel highly enough. It is far more than a simple dystopian vision of a possible future, and more than a warning about certain political ideas. It is a masterwork of engaging with complex ideas (in this case, the nature of power) in the setting of a novel. Though the prose is brilliant and easy to read, this is a novel which rewards slow reading and thoughtful consideration.

Nineteen Eighty-Four i...

Nineteen Eighty-Four is a seminal work, maybe the most important work of fiction written in English in the twentieth century. Like its only real competitor for that title, The Lord of the Rings, it is both a work of outlandish fantasy while also having something truly profound to say about our own post-Second World War world. What I find most impressive about Orwell's vision of the future are both its prescience and its political neutrality. All the most chilling aspects of Big Brother's totalitarian government--constant electronic surveillance of its citizens, rewriting history to serve the political concerns of the day, the infiltration of society by secret police--are really just exaggerations (well, one hopes that they're exaggerations) of practices that our own Western democratic governments engage in today, and have been engaging in for the past two generations. And what's more, they're practices that have been followed by parties at either end of the political spectrum--by supposedly small-government Republican (American) and Conservative (British) governments just as much as by liberal Democrats (American) or socialist Labour (British). Orwell's dark vision sees society as a whole, not just one ideology or another. Orwell himself, of course, was extremely left-wing, to the point of actually advocating revolutionary overthrow of the existing capital order, and also of fighting on the Republican side during the Spanish Civil War. For much of the Second World War he remained convinced that the national effort required to beat the Axis Powers would necessarily place such a strain on the British social order that it was guaranteed to result in Communist revolution on the Leninist model. But his Communism was not we now think of as Communism, the Cold War Soviet state of faceless bureaucracy and rigid suppression of individuality. Instead, he sought through Communism--or what he called "democratic socialism"--the opportunity to achieve the profoundest freedom for the individual, by freeing him from the fetters of capitalism. And that philosophy infuses Nineteen Eighty-Four, and is probably the biggest reason why it remains such a powerful story today. For while it is a novel of the inexorable expansion of government at the expense of the individual, its central theme is the necessity for the individual to maintain constant vigilance for the preservation of freedom (which is not the same thing as democracy).

467. 1984 a novel by ...

467. 1984 a novel by George Orwell (read 18 Sep 1954) When I read this I said: "Compared to it, other books are nursery fare. It is a real adventure in horror, a total immersion in hopelessness and terror. It is, of course, a classic and one of the most important books of our modern world, though it loses some of its urgentness and immediateness by un-subtlety and a too pessimistic view of all humans. It is a true picture, I think, of what we could expect if there were no God--minds would be able to be taken over and there could be a complete victory for the Party. But the other world is beyond Big Brother and his tortures, and so the final triumph cannot be his. To an atheist this consolation is denied. SPOILER I shall sketch briefly highlights of the book: Winston Smith, a member of the Outer party who aids in "correcting" the past, falls in love with Julia. They are betrayed and subjected to torture whereby Winston successfully becomes convinced that 2 and 2 are 5 and betrays Julia by asking that the rats about to be unleashed on his face instead be unleashed on Julia. Finally, at the end, he loves Big Brother and the horror is total. The Party has gotten inside of him and he is no longer possessed of a shred of human dignity. One of the most powerful and terrifying books I have ever read.

This is a very unhappy...

This is a very unhappy book. But, in a weird way, it is also a very hopeful book. It concerns a man named Winston, who lives in a world where every movement is watched by the Party. The Party alters all records of historical facts to conform to the latest propaganda, and the people believe it. The Party changes the language with the eventual goal of not being able to express unorthodox opinions. Those whose actions, whose very thoughts are in any way nonconformist simply cease to officially exist. These people are tortured until they are no longer capable of unorthodoxy. That's the simple version. Winston realizes what the party is doing and he holds onto his memories of the true past. He falls in love with a girl and they conduct a secret affair until one day they are captured and ruthlessly tortured. When they emerge, they are completely changed. Winston remembers his affair with Julia but he no longer cares. He unconditionally believes all the propaganda, all the record changes, and he adores the figurehead of the party - Big Brother. While reading it, sometimes I was very eager to continue and at other times I had to sit myself down and tell myself to skim a chapter. Sometimes the bravery of Winston and his lover Julia filled me with a sort of hope and at other times the imaginations of this dystopian world by the author filled me with horror and a disconcerting realization that what is in my mind might not necessarily be true. The style of writing is very precise and skilled. I would say that the main reason this book affected me as it did was because of the way it was written. When I finished the book I felt very glad that in this world, I have privacy. I am free to learn history, to read books simply just because I want to, to feel joy, to love my family, to make friends, to have crushes on people. I am glad I read this book because it made me think about the world in a different way.1984 definitely deserves to be called a classic, and is definitely absolutely worth reading.

when i first read this...

when i first read this book, i loathed it. there's a section where winston (the main character) is reading a book and i found that part rather dry. i was inspired to read it again from a friend and i am so glad i did! there are some truly great scenes in this book which i won't write out for fear of giving things away. all i have to say is more than a few times, i felt my heartbeat quicken at crucial parts in the book. it's worth reading and worth considering what any society's future could turn into if the love of power outweighs everything else. in a place where you are never truly alone, not even with your thoughts, where even the language is changed to control your thoughts or ability to think outside the box and you're surround by perpetual war and less than stellar living conditions, what becomes of your humanity? i think orwell paints a thought-provoking, mind-blowing, soul-stirring picture of the possibilities.

Customer Q&A

Get specific details about this product from customers who own it.

Policies & Plans

Pricing policy

About our prices
We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything. So if you find a current lower price from an online retailer on an identical, in-stock product, tell us and we'll match it. See more details atOnline Price Match.
webapp branch
Electrode, Comp-812497696, DC-prod-az-southcentralus-14, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-30.0.0, SHA-5b22732e63249d37428982287bc451eb2e1aab93, CID-c6471c0e-141-16dcd50884fc80, Generated: Tue, 15 Oct 2019 02:47:50 GMT