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An Affair Before Christmas

Walmart # 562863991

An Affair Before Christmas

Walmart # 562863991
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This second installment of the Desperate Duchess series from the "New York Times" bestselling author offers a sensual, seasonal tale of an English duke who is determined to win back his beguiling brides delectable affections. Original.

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This second installment of the Desperate Duchess series from the "New York Times" bestselling author offers a sensual, seasonal tale of an English duke who is determined to win back his beguiling brides delectable affections. Original. An Affair Before Christmas

Specifications

Series Title
Desperate Duchesses
Publisher
HarperCollins
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
388
Author
Eloisa James
ISBN-13
9780061245541
Publication Date
November, 2007
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
6.82 x 4.22 x 1.07 Inches
ISBN-10
0061245542
Customer Reviews
2.6
11 reviews
5 stars
0
4 stars
1
3 stars
7
2 stars
1
1 star
2
Top Positive Review
Charming historical roman
Charming historical romance. Part of James' Duchess series. The prose is excellent, the characters are interesting, and the historical accuracy seems pretty good. This is the Georgian period, not regency, but James seems spot on.
Top Negative Review
This is book two in the D
This is book two in the DD's series, but I've read them out of order (do NOT do that!), and the only reason I finished reading this story was Villiers. I was so glad that at least one third of the story involved him and the consequences he suffered because of the duel he fought. The relationship he cultivated with Charlotte the spinster, was vastly entertaining and I had so much fun following that story.As for the main plot, characters and substance of the story? It left me wanting and I found it lacking in all the areas that makes romance, a romance.I barely liked this couple. The heroine wasn't just naïve, she was downright ridiculous. I had somewhat better opinion of the hero, but even he couldn't salvage this story. My advice to you is to read Villiers parts, and skip the rest.Melanie for b2b
Top Positive Review
Charming historical roman
Charming historical romance. Part of James' Duchess series. The prose is excellent, the characters are interesting, and the historical accuracy seems pretty good. This is the Georgian period, not regency, but James seems spot on.
Top Negative Review
This is book two in the D
This is book two in the DD's series, but I've read them out of order (do NOT do that!), and the only reason I finished reading this story was Villiers. I was so glad that at least one third of the story involved him and the consequences he suffered because of the duel he fought. The relationship he cultivated with Charlotte the spinster, was vastly entertaining and I had so much fun following that story.As for the main plot, characters and substance of the story? It left me wanting and I found it lacking in all the areas that makes romance, a romance.I barely liked this couple. The heroine wasn't just naïve, she was downright ridiculous. I had somewhat better opinion of the hero, but even he couldn't salvage this story. My advice to you is to read Villiers parts, and skip the rest.Melanie for b2b
1-5 of 11 reviews

Charming historical roman

Charming historical romance. Part of James' Duchess series. The prose is excellent, the characters are interesting, and the historical accuracy seems pretty good. This is the Georgian period, not regency, but James seems spot on.

Summary: Poppy and the Du

Summary: Poppy and the Duke of Fletcher met in Paris and fell madly in love. However, thanks to Poppy being conditioned to think that women can never enjoy sex, relations between them have grown cold and frigid. It'll take a special Christmas to bring them back together again. Review: After the disappointment that was Desperate Duchesses, I thought that Eloisa James would improve if I gave her another chance. I have enjoyed some of her books in the past and she has a knack for amusing subplots and great secondary characters, not to mention an eye for historical detail. But what I've come to realize is that whenever I pick up one of her novels, I look for those things and practically ignore the main romance. Which, for a romance novel, is probably not a good sign. Why do I dislike many of her romances? Mostly, the genre cliches. The excessive sentimentality, the sideline homophobia (because men and women! come together like cookies and cream! so there can't possibly be any alternate sexualities that matter!), the creepy idealization of French culture, the naive heroines, the hyper manly heroes, the requisite "aww, aren't we happy with our brood of five million children?" epilogue. Yeah. You've seen it before and you see it again. Poppy had her decent moments, such as her interest in the natural sciences, but her overwhelming naivete and sweetness was too much for me to stomach, especially when James tried to give her some forward-thinking, modern qualities as well. There are authors who can combine these two sets of qualities together and make it work (that is, create a 3D character), but James isn't one of them. At her worst, Poppy seemed like a case of trying to have your cake and eat it too. Look, she's smart and strong and operates on some feminist ideals sure to appeal to the modern reader! But look, she's also demure and shy and easily convinced by everyone around her! She has no dark moments, only angelic ones! Weird. It's a shame that Poppy and Fletcher's romance bored me to tears. Because James really is good at constructing other types of stories. I absolutely loved the plot with Villiers, Charlotte, and Dautry. The interaction between Villiers and Charlotte fascinated me, and I would have loved to have seen an entire book revolve around them instead of boring old Poppy and Fletcher. Villiers himself is a great character, both cynical and dark but with sartorial elegance, hooray! He isn't afraid that liking fashion means he's a woman (which, gods forbid, is the Worst Thing Ever). So I will continue reading this series, mostly because Eloisa James continues to draw me back with her intriguing secondary characters that I want to see appear in future books. It's funny, but I think I would appreciate her in a different genre. Maybe more of a comedy of manners? I would love her romance novels as long as she left out the romance, haha. No, really, I'm serious. Conclusion: Poppy and Fletcher who?

Summary: Poppy and the Du

Summary: Poppy and the Duke of Fletcher met in Paris and fell madly in love. However, thanks to Poppy being conditioned to think that women can never enjoy sex, relations between them have grown cold and frigid. It'll take a special Christmas to bring them back together again. Review: After the disappointment that was Desperate Duchesses, I thought that Eloisa James would improve if I gave her another chance. I have enjoyed some of her books in the past and she has a knack for amusing subplots and great secondary characters, not to mention an eye for historical detail. But what I've come to realize is that whenever I pick up one of her novels, I look for those things and practically ignore the main romance. Which, for a romance novel, is probably not a good sign. Why do I dislike many of her romances? Mostly, the genre cliches. The excessive sentimentality, the sideline homophobia (because men and women! come together like cookies and cream! so there can't possibly be any alternate sexualities that matter!), the creepy idealization of French culture, the naive heroines, the hyper manly heroes, the requisite "aww, aren't we happy with our brood of five million children?" epilogue. Yeah. You've seen it before and you see it again. Poppy had her decent moments, such as her interest in the natural sciences, but her overwhelming naivete and sweetness was too much for me to stomach, especially when James tried to give her some forward-thinking, modern qualities as well. There are authors who can combine these two sets of qualities together and make it work (that is, create a 3D character), but James isn't one of them. At her worst, Poppy seemed like a case of trying to have your cake and eat it too. Look, she's smart and strong and operates on some feminist ideals sure to appeal to the modern reader! But look, she's also demure and shy and easily convinced by everyone around her! She has no dark moments, only angelic ones! Weird. It's a shame that Poppy and Fletcher's romance bored me to tears. Because James really is good at constructing other types of stories. I absolutely loved the plot with Villiers, Charlotte, and Dautry. The interaction between Villiers and Charlotte fascinated me, and I would have loved to have seen an entire book revolve around them instead of boring old Poppy and Fletcher. Villiers himself is a great character, both cynical and dark but with sartorial elegance, hooray! He isn't afraid that liking fashion means he's a woman (which, gods forbid, is the Worst Thing Ever). So I will continue reading this series, mostly because Eloisa James continues to draw me back with her intriguing secondary characters that I want to see appear in future books. It's funny, but I think I would appreciate her in a different genre. Maybe more of a comedy of manners? I would love her romance novels as long as she left out the romance, haha. No, really, I'm serious. Conclusion: Poppy and Fletcher who?

This book is actually thr

This book is actually three stories - Fletch and Poppy's, Jemma's, and Charlotte Tetlock and the Duke of Villiers'. Unlike in her other books, it's hard to say which one is really dominant - they're given close to equal time. The main story - Fletch and Poppy's - is, in my opinion, the weakest, replaying parts of "Your Wicked Ways" that were done better there - the innocent bride who finds sex horrible and it tears apart their relationships, but they actually still love each other...blah, blah. Read "Your Wicked Ways" - it's better. However, the Duke of Villiers is a fantastic story, and his story - even though he's in bed the whole time, recovering (very slowly and painfully) from a sword wound he received in a duel in "Desperate Duchesses" - it's the part that captures you and keeps your interest.

There were so many sub-pl

There were so many sub-plots going on in this book that Poppy and John's story was almost overshadowed. If it hadn't been for the late addition of the Charlotte and Dautry storyline I don't think I would have like this book half as much.

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Electrode, Comp-504176105, DC-prod-az-southcentralus-5, ENV-prod-bravo, PROF-PROD, VER-29.0.16-rc-3, SHA-f3cc9abc75985e3e599efd6e39d93072b53bbc65, CID-a317df67-3db-16ae73a6c7f653, Generated: Fri, 24 May 2019 00:25:27 GMT