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Customer reviews & ratings

3.4
Average Rating:(3.4)out of 5 stars
31 ratings
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Most helpful positive review
1 customers found this helpful
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
When you look at the t...
When you look at the title: "The 4- Hour Workweek" you can't help but think it must be some sort of scam. I certainly did. I couldn't be bothered to even look at the book when I first saw it on a bookstore shelf. Months later, when I was bored and browsing my library for an entertaining audio book, this book stared at me again. And this time I decided to give it a listen. From the first pages on, the author T.Ferris drew me in. He starts out by sharing his own story from "grossly overworked and severely underpaid office worker to a member of the New Rich". Ferris is only 30 years old, yet he has started multiple businesses and learned a few lessons in the process. One of them being: "Work smarter not harder" (I know, that's a new one.) He explains that the members of "the New Rich are those who abandon the deferred- life plan and create luxury lifestyles in the present using the currency of the New Rich: time and mobility." According to Ferriss our society has it all wrong. We work our butts off for 40- 50 years in the hopes of enjoying life once we hit retirement. By doing that we miss out on life and what if we never get to retirement? For that reason the author proposes to start an income producing business that bothers us as little as possible. He gives the exact steps on how to find the right business. One where you will be able to take yourself out of the picture and let other people run the business for you. Sounds scary, but his ideas seem to work. And obviously this principle has worked for him. Ferriss also included some chapters on Time Management (How to be more productive with less time), Cultivating Selective Ignorance (Only consume information from TV, newspapers and online sources if you will use it for something immediate and important),the Art of keeping people from interrupting you, and best of all a chapter on how to outsource your life. Overall, this book had some great ideas and it will certainly help you to redefine what success looks like to you. I doubt you will only work 4 hours a week, but you might become more productive with your time and learn to enjoy life while it's happening.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(1.0)out of 5 stars
I figure, having been ...
I figure, having been unemployed most of this year, I'd see if there were any suggestions in this book that I could actually apply into the kind of career I actually want to do. Well, that and it was free on a holiday promotion. There are words to describe my opinion of this book, however most of them would break the terms and conditions of this site. Suffice it to say, it's one big sales pitch for being an egomaniac, passive agressive jerk. It boils entirely down to outsource or eliminate anything you can, any way you can, handwaves at "creating" businesses with no actual, practical advice on how to determine a market need (which is the hardest part of any business: Figuring out what's needed in the first place!), and then spend lots of your time places where the exchange rate makes you comparatively rich.Not even worth free.
Most helpful positive review
1 customers found this helpful
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
When you look at the t...
When you look at the title: "The 4- Hour Workweek" you can't help but think it must be some sort of scam. I certainly did. I couldn't be bothered to even look at the book when I first saw it on a bookstore shelf. Months later, when I was bored and browsing my library for an entertaining audio book, this book stared at me again. And this time I decided to give it a listen. From the first pages on, the author T.Ferris drew me in. He starts out by sharing his own story from "grossly overworked and severely underpaid office worker to a member of the New Rich". Ferris is only 30 years old, yet he has started multiple businesses and learned a few lessons in the process. One of them being: "Work smarter not harder" (I know, that's a new one.) He explains that the members of "the New Rich are those who abandon the deferred- life plan and create luxury lifestyles in the present using the currency of the New Rich: time and mobility." According to Ferriss our society has it all wrong. We work our butts off for 40- 50 years in the hopes of enjoying life once we hit retirement. By doing that we miss out on life and what if we never get to retirement? For that reason the author proposes to start an income producing business that bothers us as little as possible. He gives the exact steps on how to find the right business. One where you will be able to take yourself out of the picture and let other people run the business for you. Sounds scary, but his ideas seem to work. And obviously this principle has worked for him. Ferriss also included some chapters on Time Management (How to be more productive with less time), Cultivating Selective Ignorance (Only consume information from TV, newspapers and online sources if you will use it for something immediate and important),the Art of keeping people from interrupting you, and best of all a chapter on how to outsource your life. Overall, this book had some great ideas and it will certainly help you to redefine what success looks like to you. I doubt you will only work 4 hours a week, but you might become more productive with your time and learn to enjoy life while it's happening.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(1.0)out of 5 stars
I figure, having been ...
I figure, having been unemployed most of this year, I'd see if there were any suggestions in this book that I could actually apply into the kind of career I actually want to do. Well, that and it was free on a holiday promotion. There are words to describe my opinion of this book, however most of them would break the terms and conditions of this site. Suffice it to say, it's one big sales pitch for being an egomaniac, passive agressive jerk. It boils entirely down to outsource or eliminate anything you can, any way you can, handwaves at "creating" businesses with no actual, practical advice on how to determine a market need (which is the hardest part of any business: Figuring out what's needed in the first place!), and then spend lots of your time places where the exchange rate makes you comparatively rich.Not even worth free.
<ul><li>Format:Audiobook</li><li>Publication Date: 2007-04-24</li></ul>
31 reviews
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

When you look at the t...

When you look at the title: "The 4- Hour Workweek" you can't help but think it must be some sort of scam. I certainly did. I couldn't be bothered to even look at the book when I first saw it on a bookstore shelf. Months later, when I was bored and browsing my library for an entertaining audio book, this book stared at me again. And this time I decided to give it a listen. From the first pages on, the author T.Ferris drew me in. He starts out by sharing his own story from "grossly overworked and severely underpaid office worker to a member of the New Rich". Ferris is only 30 years old, yet he has started multiple businesses and learned a few lessons in the process. One of them being: "Work smarter not harder" (I know, that's a new one.) He explains that the members of "the New Rich are those who abandon the deferred- life plan and create luxury lifestyles in the present using the currency of the New Rich: time and mobility." According to Ferriss our society has it all wrong. We work our butts off for 40- 50 years in the hopes of enjoying life once we hit retirement. By doing that we miss out on life and what if we never get to retirement? For that reason the author proposes to start an income producing business that bothers us as little as possible. He gives the exact steps on how to find the right business. One where you will be able to take yourself out of the picture and let other people run the business for you. Sounds scary, but his ideas seem to work. And obviously this principle has worked for him. Ferriss also included some chapters on Time Management (How to be more productive with less time), Cultivating Selective Ignorance (Only consume information from TV, newspapers and online sources if you will use it for something immediate and important),the Art of keeping people from interrupting you, and best of all a chapter on how to outsource your life. Overall, this book had some great ideas and it will certainly help you to redefine what success looks like to you. I doubt you will only work 4 hours a week, but you might become more productive with your time and learn to enjoy life while it's happening.

Helpful?
Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

The 4HWW isnt a book ...

The 4HWW isn't a book about doing nothing and relaxing. Tim writes about how he changed his lifestyle so he could pursue what made life interesting for him. Tim writes about abandoning the deferred lifestyle plan (waiting till retirement), the currency of the New Rich- time and mobility and maximising the 80/20 rule- focusing your efforts on the 20 percent of things that create the moth results. What makes the book really interesting is all the examples. Tim doesn't write about hypothetical examples, he writes about what has worked for him.

Helpful?
Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Some very good parts t...

Some very good parts to this book, and generally a quality examination of productivity and what's important versus looking busy and being a materialistic zombie.However, there are many "Carlton Sheets Late Night informercial" parts to this book, and the martial arts example early in the book sounds like playing basketball against 7th graders.

Helpful?
Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

The 4-Hour Workweek is...

The 4-Hour Workweek is an eye-opening book. Should you take everything in it at face value without questioning it? Of course not. Should you read it with an open mind and learn new things and new ideas that apply to you? Definitely. Although there is a lot of resistance and denial, especially among older generations, the work and career environment has changed radically in the past few decades, and old models simply aren't in touch with modern realities. While I would recommend this book to anybody, I'm especially eager to get it into the hands of young adults who are likely to be misinformed by parents, counselors, and others who are guiding them toward career paths that may have worked in the past but are unreliable (at best) today.

Helpful?
Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

Tim Ferriss bends all ...

Tim Ferriss bends all the rules of the American workforce. By starting his own product-focused company and outsourcing as much of the process as possible, he remains free to travel the world and have all kinds of fantastic adventures. The lifestyle is probably not for everyone -- for one thing, it's not exactly a piece of cake to start a reliable business. But the tips are handy, regardless. It's a must-read for overstressed start-up founders, mobile technology workers, and anyone who wants more out of life but needs tips on the execution.

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Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

I spent an hour readin...

I spent an hour reading this book in a barnes and noble and i was pleasantly surprised -- the author's personal experience is at times laughable but often perceptive and clever (or at least compels you to at least consider a very different perspective from the norm). For example, it would be one thing (and a bad thing) to be told to simply take advantage of the global outsourcing trend by outsourcing my life to an assistant in India -- I'd roll my eyes and put the book down. But to read of this author's amusing series of outsourcing tales and to be able to draw out insights from the experience -- what it taught him in terms of how to seek out capable staff, how to manage and manage remotely -- well, that's worth something. A chuckle. A moment to reflect on a new perspective. I don't know, I wouldn't buy this book (though it is exhaustive in providing additional contacts, resources, and references to his ideas) -- but it was definitely an interesting hour in the bookstore.

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Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

My preference for this...

My preference for this book is very uneven. It's not what I expected exactly. I very much enjoyed the discussion regarding paradigm shifting in lifestyle choices and strategies. The discussions includes things like thinking globally, divesting yourself from some of the never used "energy sapping material things" in your life, and focusing your efforts on the things that you really enjoy doing. The author is very much the extrovert (I am not) though and the book is written from that point of view. The "business creating stuff" was of some interest (and might be more to others) but did not hold my fascination and I found myself flipping through these page rather quickly.

Helpful?
Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

The thing to take from...

The thing to take from this book is that modern work methodology is changing. Still, I found much of this book to be all about self-interest. Furthermore, it must be realized that not all work can be relegated so easily and when it actually comes down to it, someone still needs to get the real work done. Some contradictions also exist: 1) Somehow, the book begins by attracting the reader with all sort of materialistic advances but in the final pages the author says that a simple life is what one should really strive for. 2) The author advocates speed-reading through much of the book but also states that a much slower living pace should be striven for by people. I cannot help but notice that these two items are closely related.

Helpful?
Average Rating:(1.0)out of 5 stars

I figure, having been ...

I figure, having been unemployed most of this year, I'd see if there were any suggestions in this book that I could actually apply into the kind of career I actually want to do. Well, that and it was free on a holiday promotion. There are words to describe my opinion of this book, however most of them would break the terms and conditions of this site. Suffice it to say, it's one big sales pitch for being an egomaniac, passive agressive jerk. It boils entirely down to outsource or eliminate anything you can, any way you can, handwaves at "creating" businesses with no actual, practical advice on how to determine a market need (which is the hardest part of any business: Figuring out what's needed in the first place!), and then spend lots of your time places where the exchange rate makes you comparatively rich.Not even worth free.

Helpful?
Average Rating:(1.0)out of 5 stars

I tried reading this b...

I tried reading this book. I really did. But I just couldn't go on after he went on about how he won some Chinese kickboxing tournament by basically cheating without technically breaking any rules (my eyes are still rolling over this one). The kicker is that he presents this to the reader with great pride, as if this were behavior that decent people should actually emulate. Really? I'm supposed to want to be like this guy? Sorry. Whatever it is that Tim Ferriss is selling, I want no part of it.

Helpful?
Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Believable? Yes I can ...

Believable? Yes I can see how all of the information taken seriously you could end up doing exactly as he states and be working a four hour work week. Many naysayers may state otherwise, but you have to have a drive and commitment in yourself before you can finally take that leap. I may not have that drive currently, but if the opportunities present themselves then ill have Tim Ferriss' book to look at for guidance and proceeding to the next step. He's included numerous excellent resources and information to also look into so this book is just a cornerstone to achieving your dreams.

Helpful?
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars

This was an entertaini...

This was an entertaining book but not really a helpful one. The solution to all of life's problems seems to be "start a $10k a month internet business", and while I'm sure that works, if it was that easy the economic climate in America would look very different. I also kind of don't believe a word this dude says, because he seems to have only the most tenuous grasp on basic ethics. It wasn't a waste of time to read, but I would not spend a dime on it nor seek out his other work.

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Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

This changed my life. ...

This changed my life. Not sure what else to say. I happen to be a work-at-home person already and have some unique advantages that make me able to pull this off. Didn't like/didn't buy the success of the Indian outsourcing; my experience is that it's more expensive and less successful. And he does well to talk about what I hit, which is that I don't like travel (a lot of the book assumes the person likes travel, honestly, which is one criticism), and so I don't really have an all consuming alternate activity I want to fill my life with. Working is as enjoyable as any other activity, and he covers what happens if you do the process, get to fewer hours, but don't have something to fill it with. However, all these a nit criticisms. Over all this is a revolutionary book and I suspect it will affect a lot of readers.

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Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Tim Ferriss new book ...

Tim Ferriss' new book The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich isn't for everyone but I thought he made some really good points. * We work from 9-5 because we are supposed to work 40 hours a week from 9-5. * We are very unproductive at work. How many hours did you spend this week in meetings, answering emails or surfing the web? * We are busy working hard and saving for retirement when we should be figuring out how to do what we want to do now. * We have way too much information to digest from blogs to news to email. What he suggests, among many other things, is: * Be more productive. Figure out what you do when you are not working (like blogging emailing or reading blogs and news) and cut it out. * Get lots done in a little time so you have lots more time for things you enjoy. He suggest working just an hour a day. * Outsource anything and everything possible including all your errands. * Figure out what excites you so you know what you want to be doing. (He stresses excitement over enjoyment. Like I've said, too much hanging out on the beach can get boring.) * Work towards a positive monthly cash flow instead of a large sum of money you'll use during retirement. * Take lots of mini-retirements or mini-vacations - so save up for those and then do them. * He advocates lots of travel and lots of learning - especially other languages. In order to accomplish all this, he suggests starting a business selling a product. Then outsource everything from creating the product to marketing to order fulfillment to others. I bet if you read the book, you'd get at least one really good idea out of it. I bet most people that read the book don't end up quitting their job and starting an outsourced product company, but you never know!

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Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

I listen to Ferriss p...

I listen to Ferriss' podcast and have often been amused at the "living life hacker." I also hear his confessions about his habits, struggles, addictions, and how sometimes he gets razzed by his friends for still working a 60 hour week. The point of the book, he said recently, is that you can get 40 hours worth of work done in a time closer to four hours than 40. After reading the book I'd say the main thesis is that you can gain "freedom from what you dislike, freedom to pursue your dreams without reverting to work for work's sake (W4W)." You can be among the "New Rich" that gave up their high-paying desk jobs and commutes and found ways to delegate and automate their activities and now travel the world, partying and learning languages or whatever strikes their fancy."Less is not laziness...doing less meaningless work, so that you can focus on things of greater personal importance, is NOT laziness." Ferriss stresses doing the "minimum necessary for maximum effect ('minimum effective load')." This type of thinking is missing from the theology of work literature. How about a theology of productivity and efficiency?Ferriss gives plenty of tips for how to get this done. Find ways to automate routine tasks, like responding to emails or processing orders. Outsource some menial activities to virtual assistants in India (I followed his tip and outsourced a menial task to someone in Pakistan this week, was a good decision). Schedule your day--focus on accomplishing two separate tasks and do not allow distractions during their completion. Compress your tasks with tight deadlines so that you rev up your effort (if you had a gun to your head, you would do everything faster and more effeciently). Check email once or twice a day, never answer voicemails. Follow the 80/20 rule: Elminate the 20% of your customers that create 80% of your headaches, focus on the 20% that generate 80% of your revenue.Give free lectures on your local university campus, put that on your CV, list yourself places where journalists can find you, give interviews and write books and articles that will lead to greater fame and income. Don't invent things and make yourself busy to feel important. Busyness is not productivity or desirable. Stop reading the news and be selectively ignorant. If you do read, follow his tips for reading faster. Find ways to get out of meetings, don't hold them yourselves, and negotiate with your boss for permission to work remotely.Once you go remote, make it abroad. Learn languages, party, and enjoy life."Retirement is worst-case scenario insurance." People work hard, save up, and then retire hoping to do activities to "enjoy life" when it would have been much more enjoyable in their 20s and 30s when they had health. Why not do it now, is his point.There is a great deal of selfishness is Ferriss' thinking. While he gives examples of people who have kids, most examples--including his own-- do not; there appear to be no considerations of love in his life other than to satisfy his own physical desires. He has never had to wake up at 3am to change a diaper or sacrifice his time to sit with a sick daughter-- you can't delegate or outsource those activities, and they have a major impact on all else that you do. He does not appear curious about the meaning of his work, or the purpose of life. I believe everyone looks to be part of a cause greater than themselves in some way, which is why we respond to leadership. There is no aspect of that in this book, it is basically how to lead yourself into being an island (albeit a very productive one) to one's self. While Ferriss fills his time with accomplishments in martial arts, cooking, language, and dancing one wonders if he's not just trying really hard to fill a void in his soul that others fill with relationships, family, and community.I have read 90 books so far this year because I've found ways to make my day more efficient. But I free up time for personal enjoyment in activities-- like reading the news-- that Ferriss says I should avoid. I also have a family that is dependent on my success for health insurance but is also demanding/deserving of a large chunk of my time that I would love to selfishly spend elsewhere. That's what love is, and that's what is missing from this book.So, I enjoyed the book and recommend it with the above paragraph as my caveat. 3 stars out of 5.I will check out his other books on fitness and cooking for some tips.

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Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Believable? Yes I can ...

Believable? Yes I can see how all of the information taken seriously you could end up doing exactly as he states and be working a four hour work week. Many naysayers may state otherwise, but you have to have a drive and commitment in yourself before you can finally take that leap. I may not have that drive currently, but if the opportunities present themselves then ill have Tim Ferriss' book to look at for guidance and proceeding to the next step. He's included numerous excellent resources and information to also look into so this book is just a cornerstone to achieving your dreams.

Helpful?
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

The book is not about ...

The book is not about cutting your workday in half but optimizing what you do with your time. Ferriss is his own lab rat experimenting with life and health to optimize results with a "minimal effective dose" of effort. His first book challenges the conventional view of the workday and how society defines success. Some ideas may seem quaint now because so many bloggers and thought leaders in social media have been greatly influenced by his work. The book is a guide to hacking work and life to optimize personal output and learning capability. His other works, The 4-Hour Body and The 4-Hour Chef continue the lifehacking philosophy of health and learning respectively (4HC is not a cookbook but a book about optimal learning while learning about food and cooking). The great value of 4HWW is the way "work" is broken apart and analyzed and, hopefully, reassembled into something better.

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Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

After reading this boo...

After reading this book I can't say that I can start my own business and work only 4 hours a week, however, I think the overall theme of taking control of your life is on point. Tim Ferris' story is at the very least inspirational and gave me reason to reflect on various aspects of my life and the direction I should be taking to reach my goals. This is a quick read and book that I will pick up again for inspiration.

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Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars

I simultaneously want ...

I simultaneously want to shake his hand and punch him in the throat. Good thing I punch with my left. There's wisdom in here, that's for sure. A lot of it is just applying lean manufacturing principles to your own life and business. It's also, however, got some evil. Most of these ideas seem to work only if you keep everyone else fooled into not doing them. How do you write a chapter where you tell people to use false testimonials and then end it with testimonials? God forbid if the people that thought Dale Carnegie was manipulative should read this book.

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Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

Tired of the 8-5 routi...

Tired of the 8-5 routine? Do you feel a twinge of jealousy when you encounter those with more freedom than you seem to have? Are you an entrepreneur whose business world revolves around you and you think it will all come crashing down without you? This book really does have something for about everyone. A lot of what Ferriss suggests seems really only practical for those owning their own business, but corporate drones can benefit too. Before I even started reading the book, I accomplished one of the fundamental tenets of the book: I obtained permission to work two weeks from the Philippines. Ferriss does a great job covering a lot of "how-to"; he doesn't merely make vague suggestions that require further investigation and follow-up; he cites specific tools and websites and describes out to effectively use them to do anything from working remotely (and preferably with minimal disruption from the office) to traveling on the cheap -- but living well in the process. Ferriss even takes children into account: after all, the goal is to do your life's work and live a good life, and not waiting for retirement before embarking on the latter. While I seem to have a good start at leveraging this book to my advantage, I'll be looking for opportunities to make use of additional concepts listed both here and on Ferriss' website. Even if your ambition doesn't include world travel, the organizational tips will work well at just improving your domestic life. Unless you really want your grave stone to read "he worked hard for long hours," there is something in this book that can help improve your life.

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