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Customer reviews & ratings

3.4
Average Rating:(3.4)out of 5 stars
235 ratings
5 stars
35
4 stars
82
3 stars
74
2 stars
31
1 star
13
5 stars
35
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82
3 stars
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Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
Although often critici...
Although often criticized for his repetition of the same story line, Dan Brown has once again done what he has set out to do, i.e. entertain. As quick paced as his other stories, 'Inferno' was highly entertaining and Brown's intricate story line keeps you guessing until the end.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(1.0)out of 5 stars
Repetitive, dull, sch...
Repetitive, dull, schlock. I happen to love Florence, so that is all that kept me going. Plus I was in flight with a five year old next to me. And since I was reading on a Kindle it was easy to skim and skim and skim. If you are someone who is fascinated by The Divine Comedy, well maybe this would appeal to you. Anyone else ... I'd say skip it.
Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
Although often critici...
Although often criticized for his repetition of the same story line, Dan Brown has once again done what he has set out to do, i.e. entertain. As quick paced as his other stories, 'Inferno' was highly entertaining and Brown's intricate story line keeps you guessing until the end.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(1.0)out of 5 stars
Repetitive, dull, sch...
Repetitive, dull, schlock. I happen to love Florence, so that is all that kept me going. Plus I was in flight with a five year old next to me. And since I was reading on a Kindle it was easy to skim and skim and skim. If you are someone who is fascinated by The Divine Comedy, well maybe this would appeal to you. Anyone else ... I'd say skip it.
9780385539852
235 reviews
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

Although often critici...

Although often criticized for his repetition of the same story line, Dan Brown has once again done what he has set out to do, i.e. entertain. As quick paced as his other stories, 'Inferno' was highly entertaining and Brown's intricate story line keeps you guessing until the end.

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Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Yes, Inferno is contri...

Yes, Inferno is contrived, unrealistic, corny, clichéd, and probably linguistically inadequate. But it is really good fun. Sure, it doesn't take long for the book to turn into the standard Dan Brown game of cat and mouse. Fortunately, that seems to kind of be his thing, and the book makes for an incredibly entertaining game of cat and mouse. The story revolves around The Divine Comedy, a 14th century work by Dante and, surprise, various pieces of art based on this work. This time it all begins with Mr. Langdon waking up in a hospital without being able to remember how he got there. It takes about one chapter for someone to start shooting at him, and everything escalates from there. It doesn't take long for the story to start moving at an incredible pace, and it's truly impressive how well the tension and drama is sustained for over 400 pages. As one would expect there is a good deal of general trivia about art, symbolism and so on, but only just enough for the atmosphere and tone of the story to be maintained, without distracting from or breaking the pace of the actual events that are taking place. The characters are no less shallow than they need to be to play their part in the story, but honestly, who cares about the lack of character development? Who cares if a bunch of really intelligent people happen to not figure out something trivial until the story calls for it? Who cares if super-elite-infallible-organisation(tm) happens to repeatedly make mistakes when it suits the narrative? That's not the point. Anyone picking up this book seeking intricate relationships, character development, and elaborately constructed sub-plots should (and probably do) know better. Inferno is as formulaic and typical as anyone would hope, anticipate, or fear that it is. Regardless of what one might think of the formula, it is followed with great success. Inferno is certainly more entertaining than The Lost Symbol, and I think it might just have overtaken Deception Point to become my new favourite Dan Brown book. Is this a book I will still be thinking about three days from now? Probably not. Of course, the book ends on the usual pseudo-political food-for-thought kind of note which ties up the story nicely. It works well as the end of the story, and as ten seconds of brain fodder while staring into space. Otherwise Inferno fits well into the category of books that are like firework-displays. It's great while it lasts, intense and colourful enough to make you go "oooooh", and has plenty of loud bangs. Then it is gone, and you realise that it might all have been a bit pointless. Maybe it is all a bit pointless. There is certainly more than enough about this book to dislike and criticise. However, if one is fortunate enough not to care too much about any of its flaws, Inferno is good fun. Really good fun.

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Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Inferno, Dan Browns...

"Inferno," Dan Brown's latest offering is like his other novels, a formulaic who-done-it travelogue through the world of art. This time protagonist Dr. Robert Langdon finds himself - literally finds himself - transported to Florence, Italy where - wait for it - people are trying to kill him for reasons yet unknown. Who would have guessed? It would seem that after the last few novels, professor Langdon would be considering another line of work, but noooo! What fun would that be? In truth, it is a tale well told and worth the price of admission provided you wear your ideological waders to get you through the sermonizing of left-wing, climate change/ over-population dogma interwoven in the text. In this iteration of the formula, Mr. Brown relies heavily on the Deus Ex Machina Company's literary CGI division to deliver improbable twist after improbable twist - literally the CGI equivalent of falling off a three story building; smashing through a glass skylight; then getting up, brushing off (with a grimace or two) and running down the street. The only thing missing is having Dr. Langdon wake up in Bobbie Ewing's shower. "It's not quite that bad but not far from it. Still, the art history - if you can believe it all - was nicely rendered. It's nice to know that Il Duomo is actually the Cathedral di Santa Maria del Fiori. All things considered, a nice piece of brain candy, especially for art groupies. Three and half stars from this old codger.

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Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Inferno4 StarsAnyone e...

Inferno4 StarsAnyone expecting the brilliance of The Da Vinci Code will be disappointed. However, if you are interested in a fast paced, edge of your seat scavenger hunt type thriller with fascinating detail on Dante's Inferno and the art it has spawned then Dan Brown's latest should be right up your alley. The first 80% of the book is a roller-coaster ride of race-against-the-clock intrigue and mystery with a well-developed story line and compelling characterization. The final twist at this point is the result of some brilliant plotting and had me re-reading a number of earlier scenes to see how I could have missed the clues (they are there but very cleverly hidden). Unfortunately, this is also the point at which the story begins to unravel as Brown's resolution attempts to convey a moralistic/humanistic message concerning the fundamental flaws of humanity, and thereby obliterates the tension and suspense that has been building throughout the book. While Inferno is an entertaining read, and the literary and artistic trivia surrounding Dante is exceedingly captivating, there is nothing particularly hearth-shattering or controversial that would make it stand out.

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Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

Exciting book. By the ...

Exciting book. By the end, I knew all of two cities, Venice and Constantinople in addition to all the symbolism contained on the architecture in both. The book would have been a bit better with a little less of the latter. The characters were twisty and you never knew from one page to the next what they were going to do, or in one case, which side she was on. Knowledge of Dante's Inferno would have been a good prerequisite. Typical Dan Brown book and I'm glad that's all there is.

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Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

Inferno is Dan Browns...

Inferno is Dan Brown's latest Robert Langdon thriller, and with Brown there are a few things you know you are going to get: non-stop action, detailed descriptions of exotic locales (heck, DC is exotic to me, so even The Lost Symbol did this), cyphers and puzzles, good-but-not-great writing, and enough gotchas to keep your head spinning. I found Inferno to be slightly slower paced than The Lost Symbol, but not as carefully plotted out as Brown's earlier work. The book begins with Langdon recovering in hospital with a head wound and a case of amnesia, and sure enough within moments someone is trying to kill him. The reader is taken from one set scene to another in staccato fashion, with the occasional flashback or chapter focusing on a secondary character slowing the pace a little. The action takes place primarily in three locations: Florence and Venice in Italy, and Istanbul in Turkey. As is Brown's tendency, each location is given the full tourist treatment, with picture postcard descriptions of all of the major architectural sites and places of interests. These sections read largely like a Rick Steve's guidebook, and while they are definitely appealing (I found myself wanting to go back to Italy), they do tend to pull the reader out of the flow of the book when used too often (which happens a lot - Langdon is truly a man on the move). Brown's bread and butter is his use of artwork and historical locations to create elaborate puzzles that only a symbologist - a non-existent profession, but hey, if I get to travel the world like Langdon, sign me up! - can possibly solve. The problem for me, and for many of the readers I have spoken to about this, is that the puzzles just aren't that difficult. This is a problem that Brown has attempted to address, first in The Lost Symbol and now more so in Inferno, by obfuscating facts and hiding information from the reader. Here, he uses the device of Langdon's head injury and amnesia to force him to go step-by-step through the discovery process, coming to sudden realizations about obvious clues on several occasions. This comes across as contrived. And when Langdon doesn't recognize extremely direct clues that basically name specific sites, it becomes much harder to believe. Isn't Langdon supposed to be an expert? In fact, the expert in his field? And he has done plenty of work on Dante, which he reiterates a number of times. His inability to put facts together is, at times, a real head-scratcher. Further undermining the entertainment value of this book, there are a number of plot twists that really stretched this reader's suspension of disbelief, enough so that I was taken solidly out of the narrative in order to go back over earlier chapters. For a book of this sort, this is disastrous. Thrillers rely, by their nature, on their sheer page-turning velocity, and jarring the reader out of the flow by throwing in unbelievable plot twists smacks of desperate writing. On the opposite side of the spectrum, many of the twists and puzzles are so obvious that I could see them far in advance. Once or twice makes for a sense of accomplishment, but more than that and you feel as though the author is writing down to his audience a little too much. In addition, Brown has more Dei ex machina than Douglas Adams, but at least Adams was doing it for comic effect. The biggest plot hole in the entire book (and a pretty good Deus in its own right)is the fact that there is a series of clues for Langdon to follow. Each clue is carefully scripted in the grand tradition of the most clichéd of Bond villains intent on world destruction - beyond that, I won't say anything more specific so as to not spoil them for anyone. Brown already does a good enough job of that himself. On a positive note, I did actually find the novel entertaining. Brown's play with metanarrative - his occasional reminders that Dante's Inferno has inspired countless works of art, as you are reading a book that is so obviously inspired by Dante as to borrow his title - is a nice piece of self-awareness on the part of the author, and he does work many of the more common tropes of the Hero's Journey into the novel, giving it a comforting familiarity. I enjoyed the book, yes, but would I read it again? Not likely. Steve's Grade: C The book delivers on exotic locales and fast pace, but becomes too contrived by the end.

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Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars

Great book - if you ar...

Great book - if you are planning a trip to Italy and need a touring plan. With every page I turned I looked up images on Google so that I can see where they were on their Italian mystery adventure. I've never done that before and that was a lot of fun. It made reading a more adventurous experience. Otherwise I was not as impressed. The DaVinci Code was spectacular. So when all the other books have to meet that standard, it is too bad for the author. And maybe for me because I have higher expectations. I loved DaVinci code for the "what the ????" moment I got reading it. There was none of that. Although I did like the whole idea of population explosion and why we should all be concerned about that. If the books starts a global conversation on that topic then great, it served a fabulous purpose. But as for a thrilling read, ok, I will give it that. As for a spectacular mystery. Ehh.

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Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars

for sure not the same ...

for sure not the same class as his first books. I feel like a script for a fast paced movie. Just reading it made you get out of breath. But lots of repetitions and page fillers. Characters flat. I only read it because I am going to Istanbul next month and hoped for a few more insights. After Robert learned about the "sunken palace" I immediately thought of the water reservoir and was pleased that he went to the H Sophia to discover its sunken basement just to be proven wrong and I was proven right. Kind of sad that a history professor was sent in the wrong place but to have an excuse to talk about that building. Story was stretched in lots of place and who hires a hitman that FAKES hits?

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Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars

Dan Brown seems to be ...

Dan Brown seems to be losing his mojo. Most surprising is that his usually infallible pacing is off. (The last several chapters are a torrent of too quickly tied loose ends and instantaneous character transformations that go beyond any possibility of credulity). You might like this book if you enjoy every other sentence being in italics. One idea I had while reading was that instead of writing "Langdon remembered..". and then dumping a few paragraphs from a wikipedia article, Brown had instead donated each time a hundred dollars to charity, some charity would be very rich indeed. On the plus side, it's a page turner and won't take long to read.

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Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars

I dont know why I con...

I don't know why I continue to read these books. I don't really like them. Maybe it's my compulsivity to finish a series once I've started it? Inferno wasn't horrible but it wasn't as exciting a read as The Da Vinci Code either. As with his other books, Dan Brown seems to have jumped up on his own personal soapbox, although this time, instead of attacking the church, he is preaching about population growth.Brown (or his assistants) have obviously done quite a bit of research for this book. I enjoy reading his descriptions of the various locations in the book and I did enjoy learning a little more about Dante's Inferno. I just might even start reading some Dante in the future.I think my problem with Inferno and The Lost Symbol is that I just find Robert Langdon to be an unbelievable character. You would think that after a few books of being chased at gun point, kidnapped, etc. he would become suspicious of people and not be so surprised when someone shoots at him! Oh well, as much as I complain, there is a good chance that I will end up reading Dan Brown's next book...

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Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

Brown has a reputation...

Brown has a reputation for being a mediocre author, yet I still love his Robert Langdon books. But...what happened? This book was 1/4 thriller, 3/4 guidebook. I love reading the history behind historical landmarks, but not when it's narrator intrusive. Not when you're hit over the head with it. I sat down to this book like a kid with ice cream, only to have it melted and gone before I could get a tasty bite.

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Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Well, this is a very D...

Well, this is a very Dan Brown-esque book. Lots of neat architectural, literary, and art-historical details, wrapped up in a schlocky action-movie style plot.. Fast-paced and fun reading it is; great literature it's not. Certainly better than The Lost Symbol, anyway.

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Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Like all Dan Brown boo...

Like all Dan Brown books, this was very well-written. He sucked me in from the very beginning and there was never a dull moment. I would have reated this 5-stars except it was a little disconcerting that he follows a fairly predictable pattern. To avoid spoiler alerts, i won't spell it out but I still enjoyed the story very much!

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Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

I think Inferno, the 4...

I think Inferno, the 4th book in the Robert Langdon series, is a close second to the best one, The Da Vinci Code, of all the books Dan Brown has written so far, and I've read at least 6 of his other novels.The action is certainly fast paced. I could hardly force myself to put it down at night, and then I'd pick it up any time I had a free moment between tasks. It was such a well-planned novel that I was completely surprised by the ending while, at the same time, I was pleased with the way things turned out. I highly recommend this book to people who enjoy reading about intelligent people that have to solve problems in order to get to the bottom of a mystery or mysteries in this case.

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Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Fast paced story in th...

Fast paced story in the same vein as previous books in the story. Sometimes it feels it's really just an excuse to show multiple historical places. Overall pretty good, although the multiple turnarounds of the characters, etc... gets a bit much at times.

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Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

Fast read, easy read. ...

Fast read, easy read. Parts of the plot are ludicrous (amnesia? a manual projector, because cameras didn't exist in 2014?). Some of the writing is terrible. The best parts are the descriptive asides, reminding me of European vacations. I think the twist is fun, and he wraps it up quickly.

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Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

Robert Langdon awakens...

Robert Langdon awakens in a hospital. In Italy. He has lost two days from his memory. Somebody tried to murder him.Langdon and a female doctor escape from the hospital when somebody tries to finish what they started with Mr. Langdon.If you've read his other books, then you know what happens. The clues are hidden in ancient artifacts and the clever Mr. Langdon saves the day.

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Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

I loved this book. It...

I loved this book. It was better than The Lost Symbol for sure. I may have like it more because I have been to a lot of the places in the adventure. There may have been a few unnecessary plot points, but they didn't distract from the novel. I love it!

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Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

If this had been my fi...

If this had been my first Brown book, I may have been more enthralled by it. But it seemed like more of the same old same old during the long descriptions of famous museums and tourist sites, taking us from Florence to Venice to Turkey. I was rather bored, but the last 100 pages redeemed it somewhat for me. This certainly gives one something to think about. I just thought the path to the ending could have been much more interesting than it was. Maybe its time for Robt Langdon to retire.

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Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

As engrossing a puzzle...

As engrossing a puzzle as Brown's previous books featuring Langdon, and just as overpowered with the author's agenda. The crisis in the book doesn't reach a satisfactory conclusion, and the puzzle and characters are more transparent than his other works. Brown's writing feels less polished and his usual short chapters are jarring and annoying. A decent but not great read, that poses significantly more questions than it solves.

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Electrode, App-reviews-app, Comp-417adb56-b183-45cb-b086-8dc9a9528b5b, DC-wus-prod-a4, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-22.4.3, SHA-f7d5d773c4aed1253b9c82c04fa4514d41e2f133, CID-