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Holly Black; Justine Larbalestier

Zombies vs. Unicorns

Walmart # 9781416989547
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It's time to decide: Team Zombie or Team Unicorn? A must-have anthology with contributions from bestselling YA authors including Cassandra Clare, Libba Bray, Maureen Johnson, Meg Cabot, Scott Westerfeld, and Margo Lanagan. It’s time to decide: Team Zombie or Team Unicorn? A must-have anthology with contributions from bestselling YA authors is now available in paperback!

It’s a question as old as time itself: Which is better, the zombie or the unicorn? This all-original, tongue-in-cheek anthology edited by Holly Black (Team Unicorn) and Justine Larbalestier (Team Zombie), makes strong arguments for both sides in the form of  spectacular short stories. Contributors include bestselling authors Cassandra Clare, Libba Bray, Maureen Johnson, Meg Cabot, Scott Westerfeld, and Margo Lanagan.

Discover how unicorns use their powers for evil, why zombies aren’t always the enemy, and much more in this creative, laugh-out-loud collection that will have everyone asking: Team Zombie or Team Unicorn?

Customer Reviews

5 stars
13
4 stars
27
3 stars
6
2 stars
2
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
3 customers found this helpful
In the age old (accord...
In the age old (according to editors Black & Larbalestier) quest for the answer to which is cooler, brain eating zombies or rainbow farting unicorns, twelve renowned authors have taken up sides and presented stories in support of their choice. 1. The Highest Justice, by Garth Nix: An eerie tale of murder and high intrigue in a fairy tale setting. 2. Love Will Tear Us Apart, by Alaya Dawn Johnson: A high school zombie struggles to choose between competing desires. 3. Purity Test, by Naomi Novik: A teen encounters the usual assortment of unicorns, trolls and evil wizards while hanging out in Central Park. 4. Bougainvillea, by Carrie Ryan: Carrie brings her considerable imagination to bear to give us her spin on the classic Caribbean governor's daughter meets zombies tale. I enjoyed this much more than I did Forest of Hands & Teeth. 5. A Thousand Flowers, by Margo Lanagan: A touching and very unusual love story. 6. The Children of the Revolution, by Maureen Johnson: A tongue in cheek exposé of the truth behind that beautiful celebrity couple and all their adopted children. 7. The Care and Feeding of Your Baby Killer Unicorn, by Diana Peterfreund: A fascinating tale where unicorns are less the stuff of dreams than of nightmares. 8. Inoculata, by Scott Westerfeld: A classic zombie tale with an element of Mad Max thrown in. I guess that comes from being married to an Aussie. 9. Princess Prettypants, by Meg Cabot: It's a good thing this is a story in an anthology. There is no way I would be caught dead with a book with this title on the cover. That said, this is a surprisingly entertaining story of a 17 year-old girl who doesn't get the car she wanted for her birthday. 10. Cold Hands, by Cassandra Clare: A classic romance with a dash of murder intrigue and undead thrown in. 11. The Third Virgin, by Kathleen Duey: And I thought serial killers were a uniquely human phenomenon. This one is fascinating and very original. 12. Prom Night, by Libba Bray: In a bleak world where all adults have turned into undead, the remaining teens struggle to retain a tenuous hold on normality. All of the stories are entertaining (not a stinker in the lot) a couple of the unicorn tales give off a hint of saccharin and one or two of the zombie stories tend to shamble a bit. My three favorites (Bougainvillea, Children of the Revolution & Cold Hands) just happen to all be zombie tales so I guess that if I were the judge, I'd have to side with the undead. I still don't think I'd let my daughters date one, though.
Most helpful negative review
It was ok. I only real...
It was ok. I only really enjoyed about half of the stories. Cassandra Clare's and Meg Cabot's were the best. There also was one story that I enjoyed but it ended really suddenly and with no real conclusion which I hated. The best parts were the banter between Holly and Justine in the introduction and at the beginning of each chapter. If I had to choose I think I'd have to say the zombies won!
Most helpful positive review
3 customers found this helpful
In the age old (accord...
In the age old (according to editors Black & Larbalestier) quest for the answer to which is cooler, brain eating zombies or rainbow farting unicorns, twelve renowned authors have taken up sides and presented stories in support of their choice. 1. The Highest Justice, by Garth Nix: An eerie tale of murder and high intrigue in a fairy tale setting. 2. Love Will Tear Us Apart, by Alaya Dawn Johnson: A high school zombie struggles to choose between competing desires. 3. Purity Test, by Naomi Novik: A teen encounters the usual assortment of unicorns, trolls and evil wizards while hanging out in Central Park. 4. Bougainvillea, by Carrie Ryan: Carrie brings her considerable imagination to bear to give us her spin on the classic Caribbean governor's daughter meets zombies tale. I enjoyed this much more than I did Forest of Hands & Teeth. 5. A Thousand Flowers, by Margo Lanagan: A touching and very unusual love story. 6. The Children of the Revolution, by Maureen Johnson: A tongue in cheek exposé of the truth behind that beautiful celebrity couple and all their adopted children. 7. The Care and Feeding of Your Baby Killer Unicorn, by Diana Peterfreund: A fascinating tale where unicorns are less the stuff of dreams than of nightmares. 8. Inoculata, by Scott Westerfeld: A classic zombie tale with an element of Mad Max thrown in. I guess that comes from being married to an Aussie. 9. Princess Prettypants, by Meg Cabot: It's a good thing this is a story in an anthology. There is no way I would be caught dead with a book with this title on the cover. That said, this is a surprisingly entertaining story of a 17 year-old girl who doesn't get the car she wanted for her birthday. 10. Cold Hands, by Cassandra Clare: A classic romance with a dash of murder intrigue and undead thrown in. 11. The Third Virgin, by Kathleen Duey: And I thought serial killers were a uniquely human phenomenon. This one is fascinating and very original. 12. Prom Night, by Libba Bray: In a bleak world where all adults have turned into undead, the remaining teens struggle to retain a tenuous hold on normality. All of the stories are entertaining (not a stinker in the lot) a couple of the unicorn tales give off a hint of saccharin and one or two of the zombie stories tend to shamble a bit. My three favorites (Bougainvillea, Children of the Revolution & Cold Hands) just happen to all be zombie tales so I guess that if I were the judge, I'd have to side with the undead. I still don't think I'd let my daughters date one, though.
Most helpful negative review
It was ok. I only real...
It was ok. I only really enjoyed about half of the stories. Cassandra Clare's and Meg Cabot's were the best. There also was one story that I enjoyed but it ended really suddenly and with no real conclusion which I hated. The best parts were the banter between Holly and Justine in the introduction and at the beginning of each chapter. If I had to choose I think I'd have to say the zombies won!
1-5 of 48 reviews

In the age old (accord...

In the age old (according to editors Black & Larbalestier) quest for the answer to which is cooler, brain eating zombies or rainbow farting unicorns, twelve renowned authors have taken up sides and presented stories in support of their choice. 1. The Highest Justice, by Garth Nix: An eerie tale of murder and high intrigue in a fairy tale setting. 2. Love Will Tear Us Apart, by Alaya Dawn Johnson: A high school zombie struggles to choose between competing desires. 3. Purity Test, by Naomi Novik: A teen encounters the usual assortment of unicorns, trolls and evil wizards while hanging out in Central Park. 4. Bougainvillea, by Carrie Ryan: Carrie brings her considerable imagination to bear to give us her spin on the classic Caribbean governor's daughter meets zombies tale. I enjoyed this much more than I did Forest of Hands & Teeth. 5. A Thousand Flowers, by Margo Lanagan: A touching and very unusual love story. 6. The Children of the Revolution, by Maureen Johnson: A tongue in cheek exposé of the truth behind that beautiful celebrity couple and all their adopted children. 7. The Care and Feeding of Your Baby Killer Unicorn, by Diana Peterfreund: A fascinating tale where unicorns are less the stuff of dreams than of nightmares. 8. Inoculata, by Scott Westerfeld: A classic zombie tale with an element of Mad Max thrown in. I guess that comes from being married to an Aussie. 9. Princess Prettypants, by Meg Cabot: It's a good thing this is a story in an anthology. There is no way I would be caught dead with a book with this title on the cover. That said, this is a surprisingly entertaining story of a 17 year-old girl who doesn't get the car she wanted for her birthday. 10. Cold Hands, by Cassandra Clare: A classic romance with a dash of murder intrigue and undead thrown in. 11. The Third Virgin, by Kathleen Duey: And I thought serial killers were a uniquely human phenomenon. This one is fascinating and very original. 12. Prom Night, by Libba Bray: In a bleak world where all adults have turned into undead, the remaining teens struggle to retain a tenuous hold on normality. All of the stories are entertaining (not a stinker in the lot) a couple of the unicorn tales give off a hint of saccharin and one or two of the zombie stories tend to shamble a bit. My three favorites (Bougainvillea, Children of the Revolution & Cold Hands) just happen to all be zombie tales so I guess that if I were the judge, I'd have to side with the undead. I still don't think I'd let my daughters date one, though.

Cool cover, awesome ti...

Cool cover, awesome title and even better collection of original short stories by some hot YA writers. The banter between the editors at the beginning of the book and before each story is also quite funny. I started this anthology with a preference for unicorns (I'd been one of those kids) and I must admit that I actually liked the zombie stories better over all. In real life, I'd still stick with unicorns (even the killer ones), but this collection has given me a new perspective on zombies. Especially, zombie love (in particular, "Love Will Tear Us Apart" - seriously, macaroni and cheese!).

I have never reviewed ...

I have never reviewed an anthology, so I really don't know where to begin. I guess I will start off by saying that I usually do not like short stories, or reading a book of short stories all at one time. I usually grow bored with them. I like to have lots of character development and plot building and you just can't do that in short stories, but I am happy to say that I did not grown bored with this book. Every single author in the book is fantastic and their stories were fantastic as well. I was planning on naming my favorite zombie story and my favorite unicorns story, but as I look back through them, I just can't pick! I'll try to touch on a few of my favorites. I think my favorite was definitely Cold Hands by Cassandra Clare. This story was amazing! I want it to be the start of a new series! Forget about the Mortal Instruments, this was more awesome than those. (Yes I did just say that!) The world she creates in this story has endless possibilities and I wish we could explore them all. The characters were fantastic and Cassandra really made you feel their love for each other even though it was short. If you read one story in this anthology make it this one! Inoculata by Scott Weterfeld was also fantastic. It's another one that I wish was the beginning of a new series or book. I loved the idea of his 'cure' and the ending left you wanting more. I have never read anything by Meg Cabot so I didn't know what to expect when it came time to read Princess Prettypants. The name alone is terrifying, but the story was great! How can you go wrong with a unicorn that farts rainbows? I also love The Children of the Revolution by Maureen Johnson. It was funny and eerie at the same time. It was a lot of fun. I, of course, loved The Care and Feeding of Your Baby Killer Unicorn by Diana Peterfreund. I'm a huge fan of the Killer Unicorn series, so I was excited to read this one, and I was happy to see that it was about the back story of the new character that shows up in Ascendant. I can't wait to learn more about her! Those are only my favorites. All the stories were good. Another thing that made the book awesome were the introductions (a.k.a. arguments) between Holly and Justine! They made me laugh many times. And have you saw this book in person? Its amazing! The artwork and design are so detailed! I highly suggest that you read this book! Especially if you are a fan of any of these authors. But what you really want to know is which team, right? Going into this book I was team unicorn, but now I'm not so sure. Do I have to pick?

A friend lent this boo...

A friend lent this book to me years back (actually, I should check if it was lent or given...) Anyway, it's a light quick read and the stories are entertaining and pretty even throughout. They switch back and forth between stories about zombies and stories about unicorns. Not all the unicorns are nice...in fact, most aren't. Not all the zombies are just out to eat brains (most are though). I think the only real shortcoming was the conversations between Black and Larblestier cheering on zombie or unicorn to introduce each story. Their shtick just didn't add anything and in the cases where a story coming up was particularly dark, their joking about cheering for their respective "team" set the wrong mood before wading in.

Anthologies are hard t...

Anthologies are hard to review, I think. But that's just from personal experience. Good anthologies are also hard to come across, as well. But I like short stories. I won't deny that because I just like them. I've written some after liking some short stories so much that it made me wonder if I could write one as well. Nevertheless, anthologies are hard to tackle on in terms of reviewing. But the concept for this one is nice. Very humourous. And the cover's good too. (And the illustrations as well.) I, personally, am on Team Unicorn. But for this anthology, I'm (kind of, not all, since I couldn't choose, but if I had to...) Team Zombie in terms of which author side did what best. I will be reviewing each short story in (very!) mini reviews. The Highest Justice by Garth Nix. The story was nice, but I think it was too big of an idea to have actually be a short story since once it got really interesting, the story ended. It really did feel like a very short and condensed version of a very good adventure book though. Love Will Tear Us Apart by Alaya Dawn Johnson. I think the zombie romance on this could have been creepy if not for the fact that thankfully, the protagonist isn't dead but has a prion disease that makes him kind of a serial killer. So, thankfully, the romance was convincing and not at all creepy because if it was? *shudders* Necrophilia is not rainbows and sunshine. Purity Test by Naomi Novik. Points for humor and how much I liked it. Haven't read anything by the author, but after this, I am considering of doing so. The heroine's voice was easy to read from, but the only problem is that halfway in, the story lost its hold on me. Bougainvillea by Carrie Ryan. I've read most of the author's books so I was waiting to welcome this one in when I reached it. I was curious. The heroine's likable and the ending's twisty even though it didn't give much of an impact that I expected. It's still a great survival story and it was different in a way that there was no love triangle like her other books. A Thousand Flowers by Margo Lanagan. This was a story I was both looking forward to and not sure if I wanted to read at the same time. But it was good and bad at the same too. Although, if you are not a fan of beastality, proceed this one carefully. I think that's why I wasn't too sure about my feelings. The Children of the Revolution by Maureen Johnson. I like the satire of this one from the freaky zombie kids and the freaky celebrity and what happens to the protagonist in the end. Definitely one of my favorites. The Care and Feeding of Your Baby Killer Unicorn by Diana Peterfruend. I've always liked her books for making unicorns different. So this one was in the same vein as her unicorn books so it was a nice read that was strong and had a strong protagonist and killer unicorns. The ending was surprising. Inoculata by Scott Westerfeld. While I did enjoy it (and the idea), I think the only problem was that while the story was still developing, it ended because it was one of the longer ones from the anthology. The editor notes about it were humorous though, in my opinion. Princess Prettypants by Meg Cabot. One of humorous unicorn books that make you think of the unicorns that sparkle and fart rainbows from the summary. But it was very interesting to read and one of my favorite unicorn books. Cold Hands by Cassandra Clare. It's okay. Doesn't stand out from some of the better zombie ones though. The writing was nice, but sadly the short story didn't leave much of an impact. The Third Virgin by Kathleen Duey. My favorite unicorn short story. It's definitely some of the better ones and I didn't really want it to end. At all. I'm really curious now about the author's books. Prom Night by Libba Bray. The last book of the anthology. Another zombie apocalypse setting with this time, the adults are the zombies. Very bleak future for the characters since the children weren't the zombies. In the end, I think the commentary would have to be my favorite.

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