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R J Palacio

Wonder (Hardcover)

Average Rating:out of 5 stars
Walmart # 568742593
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The extraordinary #1 "New York Times" bestseller that has captivated over 1 million readers now also includes the bestselling short story "The Julian Chapter."
"I won't describe what I look like. Whatever you're thinking, it's probably worse. "
August Pullman was born with a facial difference that, up until now, has prevented him from going to a mainstream school. Starting 5th grade at Beecher Prep, he wants nothing more than to be treated as an ordinary kid--but his new classmates can't get past Auggie's extraordinary face. WONDER, now a #1 "New York Times" bestseller and included on the Texas Bluebonnet Award master list, begins from Auggie's point of view, but soon switches to include his classmates, his sister, her boyfriend, and others. These perspectives converge in a portrait of one community's struggle with empathy, compassion, and acceptance.
"Wonder is the best kids' book of the year," said Emily Bazelon, senior editor at Slate.com and author of "Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy." In a world where bullying among young people is an epidemic, this is a refreshing new narrative full of heart and hope. R.J. Palacio has called her debut novel "a meditation on kindness" --indeed, every reader will come away with a greater appreciation for the simple courage of friendship. Auggie is a hero to root for, a diamond in the rough who proves that you can't blend in when you were born to stand out.
Join the conversation: #thewonderofwonder

Specifications

Publisher
Turtleback Books
Book Format
Hardcover
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
320
Author
R J Palacio
Title
Wonder
ISBN-13
9780606366465
Publication Date
February, 2012
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
9.00 x 6.00 x 1.50 Inches
ISBN-10
0606366466

Customer Reviews

Average Rating:(4.6)out of 5 stars
5 stars
263
4 stars
101
3 stars
17
2 stars
3
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
3 customers found this helpful
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
I started reading Wond...
I started reading Wonder on a whim over the weekend and couldn't put it down. I'd heard good things about the book for months, and liked the book trailer, but for some reason I kept finding other books to read instead. Even though I do like middle grade books, the subject matter of this one gave me pause. Anyway, the story is so engaging and uplifting, much more so than I had expected. Totally a worthwhile read and I'm so glad I finally read it.10-year-old August Pullman was born with a severe facial abnormality. His parents home schooled him all of his life due to his frequent surgeries and medical appointments. Now, when others August's age are starting middle school, his parents think the time may be right for August to attend school as well. Auggie is a normal kid inside, smart and funny, and loves Star Wars and videogames. But will his new classmates be able to see past his outward appearance?Auggie is so endearing- he won me over from the very first pages. I was so scared for him to start middle school. Middle school is terrifying under the best of circumstances! And even though Auggie has seen reactions of strangers around him all his life, it's hard to prepare yourself for this age group. I, like Auggie, hoped for the best but steeled myself for the worst. His experience has highs and lows and focuses in on a handful of students and teachers and the different ways they interact with Auggie.There are a few kids assigned to keep an eye out for Auggie at school to show him around. Auggie is very perceptive about others and is a good judge of character- he really is a brave little guy. It's interesting to see the world through Auggie's eyes and then later revisit the same scenes through the eyes of his friends when the book shifts to multiple POV. I hadn't expected the book to shift POV actually, but it does satisfy some curiosity by hearing other characters perspective. Two of Auggie's classmates, as well as his sister, her friend, and boyfriend all take a turn at the narration. Auggie's sister Via is a standout character, as she shares the effect her brother has had on her life.Hearing the different reactions to Auggie made me think about who I would be in the scenario, and I'd react in middle school if I had a classmate like him. My daughter and I had a dialogue about it, and you always hope you'd be compassionate, but it's hard to know what is the right way to respond in the moment. The book does a great job of making you think about how to treat people fairly and with compassion. The writing is accessible and has a light touch, even though there are some heavy and distressing scenes. It is just perfect for a middle grade audience, and to read aloud for class discussion or at home. But really I think this uplifting story is appealing for all ages.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
in the book wonder, a ...
in the book wonder, a child is born with an odd face that he displeases. he has been homeschooled for 6 years and he was ready to start middle school. he wondered if the kids would make fun of him or be kind. but for now there will be many wonders in his life. this book was a little too babyish, like the way the boy speaks and the environment of the book. wonder was one of those average joe books. it wasnt terrible, it only needed a little more detail. 
Most helpful positive review
3 customers found this helpful
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
I started reading Wond...
I started reading Wonder on a whim over the weekend and couldn't put it down. I'd heard good things about the book for months, and liked the book trailer, but for some reason I kept finding other books to read instead. Even though I do like middle grade books, the subject matter of this one gave me pause. Anyway, the story is so engaging and uplifting, much more so than I had expected. Totally a worthwhile read and I'm so glad I finally read it.10-year-old August Pullman was born with a severe facial abnormality. His parents home schooled him all of his life due to his frequent surgeries and medical appointments. Now, when others August's age are starting middle school, his parents think the time may be right for August to attend school as well. Auggie is a normal kid inside, smart and funny, and loves Star Wars and videogames. But will his new classmates be able to see past his outward appearance?Auggie is so endearing- he won me over from the very first pages. I was so scared for him to start middle school. Middle school is terrifying under the best of circumstances! And even though Auggie has seen reactions of strangers around him all his life, it's hard to prepare yourself for this age group. I, like Auggie, hoped for the best but steeled myself for the worst. His experience has highs and lows and focuses in on a handful of students and teachers and the different ways they interact with Auggie.There are a few kids assigned to keep an eye out for Auggie at school to show him around. Auggie is very perceptive about others and is a good judge of character- he really is a brave little guy. It's interesting to see the world through Auggie's eyes and then later revisit the same scenes through the eyes of his friends when the book shifts to multiple POV. I hadn't expected the book to shift POV actually, but it does satisfy some curiosity by hearing other characters perspective. Two of Auggie's classmates, as well as his sister, her friend, and boyfriend all take a turn at the narration. Auggie's sister Via is a standout character, as she shares the effect her brother has had on her life.Hearing the different reactions to Auggie made me think about who I would be in the scenario, and I'd react in middle school if I had a classmate like him. My daughter and I had a dialogue about it, and you always hope you'd be compassionate, but it's hard to know what is the right way to respond in the moment. The book does a great job of making you think about how to treat people fairly and with compassion. The writing is accessible and has a light touch, even though there are some heavy and distressing scenes. It is just perfect for a middle grade audience, and to read aloud for class discussion or at home. But really I think this uplifting story is appealing for all ages.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
in the book wonder, a ...
in the book wonder, a child is born with an odd face that he displeases. he has been homeschooled for 6 years and he was ready to start middle school. he wondered if the kids would make fun of him or be kind. but for now there will be many wonders in his life. this book was a little too babyish, like the way the boy speaks and the environment of the book. wonder was one of those average joe books. it wasnt terrible, it only needed a little more detail. 
I started reading Wonder on a whim over the weekend and couldn't put it down. I'd heard good things about the book for months, and liked the book trailer, but for some reason I kept finding other books to read instead. Even though I do like middle grade books, the subject matter of this one gave me pause. Anyway, the story is so engaging and uplifting, much more so than I had expected. Totally a worthwhile read and I'm so glad I finally read it.10-year-old August Pullman was born with a severe facial abnormality. His parents home schooled him all of his life due to his frequent surgeries and medical appointments. Now, when others August's age are starting middle school, his parents think the time may be right for August to attend school as well. Auggie is a normal kid inside, smart and funny, and loves Star Wars and videogames. But will his new classmates be able to see past his outward appearance?Auggie is so endearing- he won me over from the very first pages. I was so scared for him to start middle school. Middle school is terrifying under the best of circumstances! And even though Auggie has seen reactions of strangers around him all his life, it's hard to prepare yourself for this age group. I, like Auggie, hoped for the best but steeled myself for the worst. His experience has highs and lows and focuses in on a handful of students and teachers and the different ways they interact with Auggie.There are a few kids assigned to keep an eye out for Auggie at school to show him around. Auggie is very perceptive about others and is a good judge of character- he really is a brave little guy. It's interesting to see the world through Auggie's eyes and then later revisit the same scenes through the eyes of his friends when the book shifts to multiple POV. I hadn't expected the book to shift POV actually, but it does satisfy some curiosity by hearing other characters perspective. Two of Auggie's classmates, as well as his sister, her friend, and boyfriend all take a turn at the narration. Auggie's sister Via is a standout character, as she shares the effect her brother has had on her life.Hearing the different reactions to Auggie made me think about who I would be in the scenario, and I'd react in middle school if I had a classmate like him. My daughter and I had a dialogue about it, and you always hope you'd be compassionate, but it's hard to know what is the right way to respond in the moment. The book does a great job of making you think about how to treat people fairly and with compassion. The writing is accessible and has a light touch, even though there are some heavy and distressing scenes. It is just perfect for a middle grade audience, and to read aloud for class discussion or at home. But really I think this uplifting story is appealing for all ages.
in the book wonder, a child is born with an odd face that he displeases. he has been homeschooled for 6 years and he was ready to start middle school. he wondered if the kids would make fun of him or be kind. but for now there will be many wonders in his life. this book was a little too babyish, like the way the boy speaks and the environment of the book. wonder was one of those average joe books. it wasnt terrible, it only needed a little more detail. 

Frequent mentions

1-5 of 384 reviews
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

I know, right? Five s...

I know, right? Five stars? I had to, though, because I read this book thinking like a mother of elementary- and middle-school-aged children, and if I were still that woman, I would be totally rejoicing that this lovely novel had crossed my path. Birthday present, for girl or boy? DONE Wonder is the tale of August Pullmann, born with devastating cranio-facial abnormalities, and his first year at a "regular" school. It has a point-of-view structure, so we see some of the events not only through Auggie's eyes, but also through the eyes of other kids in his class, as well as through the eyes of his high-school-aged sister Via and her friends. Auggie himself is incredibly endearing in his simple practicality and deliberate, no-big-deal courage, but it is the supporting characters who lift this novel from the ho-hum to the extraordinary. The reason that each of my children would have received this story as a gift is that it conveys, with a minimum of fuss, the thing that everyone needs to learn: that loneliness and isolation are not the tragic fate of an unfortunate few, but in fact the truth of the human condition - and the reason that we all have to learn to be kind.

Helpful?
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

I started reading Wond...

I started reading Wonder on a whim over the weekend and couldn't put it down. I'd heard good things about the book for months, and liked the book trailer, but for some reason I kept finding other books to read instead. Even though I do like middle grade books, the subject matter of this one gave me pause. Anyway, the story is so engaging and uplifting, much more so than I had expected. Totally a worthwhile read and I'm so glad I finally read it.10-year-old August Pullman was born with a severe facial abnormality. His parents home schooled him all of his life due to his frequent surgeries and medical appointments. Now, when others August's age are starting middle school, his parents think the time may be right for August to attend school as well. Auggie is a normal kid inside, smart and funny, and loves Star Wars and videogames. But will his new classmates be able to see past his outward appearance?Auggie is so endearing- he won me over from the very first pages. I was so scared for him to start middle school. Middle school is terrifying under the best of circumstances! And even though Auggie has seen reactions of strangers around him all his life, it's hard to prepare yourself for this age group. I, like Auggie, hoped for the best but steeled myself for the worst. His experience has highs and lows and focuses in on a handful of students and teachers and the different ways they interact with Auggie.There are a few kids assigned to keep an eye out for Auggie at school to show him around. Auggie is very perceptive about others and is a good judge of character- he really is a brave little guy. It's interesting to see the world through Auggie's eyes and then later revisit the same scenes through the eyes of his friends when the book shifts to multiple POV. I hadn't expected the book to shift POV actually, but it does satisfy some curiosity by hearing other characters perspective. Two of Auggie's classmates, as well as his sister, her friend, and boyfriend all take a turn at the narration. Auggie's sister Via is a standout character, as she shares the effect her brother has had on her life.Hearing the different reactions to Auggie made me think about who I would be in the scenario, and I'd react in middle school if I had a classmate like him. My daughter and I had a dialogue about it, and you always hope you'd be compassionate, but it's hard to know what is the right way to respond in the moment. The book does a great job of making you think about how to treat people fairly and with compassion. The writing is accessible and has a light touch, even though there are some heavy and distressing scenes. It is just perfect for a middle grade audience, and to read aloud for class discussion or at home. But really I think this uplifting story is appealing for all ages.

Helpful?
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

Grade 5-8. This book f...

Grade 5-8. This book follows ten-year-old August "Auggie" Pullman as he starts middle school at a new school. While this is a big step for any child, it is especially eventful for Auggie as he has been homeschooled due to his severe facial deformities. Despite his winsome personality and quirky sense of humor, he does not fit in with many of his peers who cannot see past his differences. As the story continues, Auggie experiences both emotional and physical pain, overcomes adversity, and slowly begins making friends. This touching story is tole in honest first-person prose, but is not entirely conveyed from Auggie's point of view. Rather, Palacio allows other characters--many of whom have personal struggles of their own--to raise their narrative voices. Auggie is a model character who is brave without being self-righteous, and who is really just a boy trying to find his place in the world among people who don't really think he belongs. Highly Recommended.

Helpful?
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

August is just like an...

August is just like any other 5th grader, he's a bit nerdy, loves Star Wars, is trying to fit in with friends, and is trying to figure out who he is, but August isn't like every other 5th grader. He's had more than 20 surgeries, spent a lot of his life in the hospital, never been to a school before, and his genetic disorder resulted in a disfigured face that startles other people. The story of August is told through his eyes, as well as seven other people whose lives affect him. With each section, we see a little more of the story of August's first year in middle school and how other people learn to overcome their bias and be a little kinder. It's not often that a book this powerful comes along. The characters are so realistic, that we're left wondering if this is really a fictional story. Despite its premise, the book never panders or hit readers over the head with its moral, it just lets August and his quite courage take us on his journey through 5th grade. A great story for any student age 10 and above.

Helpful?
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

I spend most of my tim...

I spend most of my time reading YA novels to make sure they aren't too racy to have in our Middle School library. Sometimes I get so tired of all of the beautiful teenagers seeing each other and falling immediately in love forever. So I take a break and read an adult novel and then brush myself off and start all over again with the YA beautiful people. This time, though, I decided to read Wonder, by R.J. Palacio, to clear the cobwebs out of my brain. I am so glad I did! This book should be read by absolutely everyone - students, teachers, people of all ages. It has such a good message, and it is told in such an uplifting way. The main character, August (Auggie) is a ten-year old boy who was born with a severe chromosomal defect that left him with serious facial deformities. Because of the many surgeries he has had to have over the years, he has never been to school before. When he is going into 5th grade (middle school for him), his parents decide it is time for him to go to school. This book is about his journey through the pitfalls of middle school - difficult for any child, but exponentially compounded by Auggie's condition. I love Auggie's voice in this book. He realizes what he looks like and understands when people stare or gasp or look away in horror, but it still hurts him. "It's like people you see sometimes, and you can't imagine what it would be like to be that person, whether it's somebody in a wheelchair or somebody who can't talk. Only, I know that I'm that person to other people, maybe to every single person in that whole auditorium. To me, though, I'm just me. An ordinary kid." ~ August Pullman It was significant that the author also told the story from the points of view of others who love Auggie. I especially appreciated hearing the thoughts and feelings of his sister, Via (short for Olivia), who loves her brother, but has had her life severely impacted by his condition. I also loved his protective and supportive parents and could feel their pain when the son they loved so much was bullied or humiliated. Our middle school participates in the Rachel's Challenge program, which was instituted by the father of Rachel Scott - the first person killed at Columbine High School. One of the fundamental principles of Rachel's Challenge is to start a chain reaction of kindness. This book goes hand-in-hand with Rachel's Challenge to treat everyone with respect and kindness. "Courage. Kindness. Friendship. Character. These are the qualities that define us as human beings, and propel us, on occasion, to greatness." ~ Mr. Tushman I not only recommend this book, I strongly encourage everyone to read it - as a family, as a class, as an individual.

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