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Treasure Island [With Headphones]

Walmart # 9781598951875
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Customer Review Snapshot

3.9 out of 5 stars
152 total reviews
5 stars
48
4 stars
56
3 stars
36
2 stars
10
1 star
2
Most helpful positive review
When I was a child I would often peruse a little pamphlet my parents owned. It was titled Hand that Rocks the Cradle and featured "a select list of books to read to children." Most of the commentary about the selections was straightforward and a little bit dull, but I've never forgotten what Mr. Bluedom had to say about Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island. WARNING: If you read this book you may not be able to enjoy any other book again because you will subconsciously compare it to the perfection of this book and always find it lacking. NOTE 1: If you read this book and find it does not captivate you, then there's no hope for you, and you may look upon yourself as a truly sorry case. NOTE 2: If you look up the word "adventure" you will find listed in the dictionary as its definition "circumstances that follow the plot of Treasure Island." As it turns out, I have read and enjoyed many books since my dad first read Treasure Island aloud to me many years ago, but nevertheless there is some truth to what Bluedom wrote. Certainly Treasure Island is the essential pirate story, and was instrumental in creating the modern mythos of the backstabbing buccaneer. But I would give it a higher accolade than that, and say that it is one of those great books that attains perfection within the bounds of its genre and, in doing so, transcends the genre. Thus, though it is often referred to as a "boy's adventure story," it can be enjoyed at all ages. Not all of my childhood favorites have held up as I've grown older, but this has. One of the reasons is Stevenson's writing. It's perfect. As G. K. Chesterton once wrote, "he seemed to pick the right word up on the point of his pen ... there was a kind of swordsmanship about it." While his prose may have been richer in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the man always had an unfailing sense of atmosphere, and here every paragraph seems to be steeped in sea salt. I find the haunting introduction of "Captain" Billy Bones particularly well done: I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow; a tall, strong, heavy nut-brown man; his tarry pigtail falling over the shoulders of his soiled blue coat; his hands ragged and scarred, with black, broken nails; and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid white. And then there is Long John Silver, one of those larger-than-life figures who has long since assumed a life beyond what his author intended for him. We tend to think of Silver now as being menacing from the very start of the story (due, no doubt, to actors such as Orson Welles and Tim Curry playing the role on screen), but he is first introduced to us as a lovable old cook with impeccable manners ... and he retains those impeccable manners right up until the end of the book, with only occasional glimpses of his true ruthlessness. The conversations between him and Jim Hawkins (our narrator/hero, an honest and likeable lad) are masterpieces of manipulative wordplay. My favorite part of the book, however, has to be the "Israel Hands" chapter. The situation is very complicated, and the tension incredible. Here are two characters who must work together to safely navigate a ship. At the same time, Jim knows that the wounded Israel is armed and plotting to kill him. And as they work, they talk about ghosts, morality, and the afterlife. ‎"Well," said I, "I'll cut you some tobacco; but if I was you and thought myself so badly, I would go to my prayers, like a Christian man." "Why?" said he. "Now, you tell me why." "Why?" I cried. "You were asking me just now about the dead. You've broken your trust; you've lived in sin and lies and blood; there's a man you killed lying at your feet this moment; and you ask me why! For God's mercy, Mr. Hands, that's why." My only complaint with the book is that the ending is rushed and less exciting than I remember. But that is a minor flaw. I could go on and on about Treasure Island, but I'll spare you. If you wish to know more, you must read it yourself.

About This Item

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This performance was awarded Audio Best of the Year. Publishers Weekly Jim Hawkins and his mother unlock a sea chest belonging to Billy Bones, an old sea captain who died while staying at their inn. Inside the chest was a logbook and map. Thus begins one of the greatest adventures of all time. Once again come aboard the Hispaniola in search of treasure with young Jim Hawkins, Dr. Livesey and Long John Silver. In the summer of 1881 Stevenson's first novel was inspired when he was helping his wife's son learn how to draw. He explained, "I made the map of an Island; it was elaborately and (I thought) beautifully colored. The shape of it took my fancy beyond expression...I ticketed my performance Treasure Island.

Specifications

Publisher
Playaway
Original Languages
ENG
Author
Stevenson, Robert Louis
ISBN-13
9781598951875
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
4.88 x 1.14 x 7.78 Inches
ISBN-10
1598951874

Customer Reviews

5 stars
48
4 stars
56
3 stars
36
2 stars
10
1 star
2
Most helpful positive review
10 customers found this helpful
When I was a child I w...
When I was a child I would often peruse a little pamphlet my parents owned. It was titled Hand that Rocks the Cradle and featured "a select list of books to read to children." Most of the commentary about the selections was straightforward and a little bit dull, but I've never forgotten what Mr. Bluedom had to say about Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island. WARNING: If you read this book you may not be able to enjoy any other book again because you will subconsciously compare it to the perfection of this book and always find it lacking. NOTE 1: If you read this book and find it does not captivate you, then there's no hope for you, and you may look upon yourself as a truly sorry case. NOTE 2: If you look up the word "adventure" you will find listed in the dictionary as its definition "circumstances that follow the plot of Treasure Island." As it turns out, I have read and enjoyed many books since my dad first read Treasure Island aloud to me many years ago, but nevertheless there is some truth to what Bluedom wrote. Certainly Treasure Island is the essential pirate story, and was instrumental in creating the modern mythos of the backstabbing buccaneer. But I would give it a higher accolade than that, and say that it is one of those great books that attains perfection within the bounds of its genre and, in doing so, transcends the genre. Thus, though it is often referred to as a "boy's adventure story," it can be enjoyed at all ages. Not all of my childhood favorites have held up as I've grown older, but this has. One of the reasons is Stevenson's writing. It's perfect. As G. K. Chesterton once wrote, "he seemed to pick the right word up on the point of his pen ... there was a kind of swordsmanship about it." While his prose may have been richer in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the man always had an unfailing sense of atmosphere, and here every paragraph seems to be steeped in sea salt. I find the haunting introduction of "Captain" Billy Bones particularly well done: I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow; a tall, strong, heavy nut-brown man; his tarry pigtail falling over the shoulders of his soiled blue coat; his hands ragged and scarred, with black, broken nails; and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid white. And then there is Long John Silver, one of those larger-than-life figures who has long since assumed a life beyond what his author intended for him. We tend to think of Silver now as being menacing from the very start of the story (due, no doubt, to actors such as Orson Welles and Tim Curry playing the role on screen), but he is first introduced to us as a lovable old cook with impeccable manners ... and he retains those impeccable manners right up until the end of the book, with only occasional glimpses of his true ruthlessness. The conversations between him and Jim Hawkins (our narrator/hero, an honest and likeable lad) are masterpieces of manipulative wordplay. My favorite part of the book, however, has to be the "Israel Hands" chapter. The situation is very complicated, and the tension incredible. Here are two characters who must work together to safely navigate a ship. At the same time, Jim knows that the wounded Israel is armed and plotting to kill him. And as they work, they talk about ghosts, morality, and the afterlife. ‎"Well," said I, "I'll cut you some tobacco; but if I was you and thought myself so badly, I would go to my prayers, like a Christian man." "Why?" said he. "Now, you tell me why." "Why?" I cried. "You were asking me just now about the dead. You've broken your trust; you've lived in sin and lies and blood; there's a man you killed lying at your feet this moment; and you ask me why! For God's mercy, Mr. Hands, that's why." My only complaint with the book is that the ending is rushed and less exciting than I remember. But that is a minor flaw. I could go on and on about Treasure Island, but I'll spare you. If you wish to know more, you must read it yourself.
Most helpful negative review
1 customers found this helpful
Never having been a fa...
Never having been a fan of the pirate genre I entered communication with Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island, one of its pillars, with some trepidation especially since as the author's biographer Claire Harmon notes like his Jekyl and Hyde, it's so well known that it hardly requires being read at all, "Long John Silver is more real to most people than any historical buccaneer." I'd like to offer a narrative of rediscovering the genre, but young Jim Hawkins is such a greedy, repellent narrator and the various pirates so difficult to understand and the story points so subtly telegraphed, I was less thrilled than appalled. That Silver and Gunn are the most entertaining figures it does go without saying, but as Harmon hints because their old bones have been resurrected so many times since, the original now seems prosaic and slothful. But such things are not Stevenson's fault, of course.
Most helpful positive review
10 customers found this helpful
When I was a child I w...
When I was a child I would often peruse a little pamphlet my parents owned. It was titled Hand that Rocks the Cradle and featured "a select list of books to read to children." Most of the commentary about the selections was straightforward and a little bit dull, but I've never forgotten what Mr. Bluedom had to say about Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island. WARNING: If you read this book you may not be able to enjoy any other book again because you will subconsciously compare it to the perfection of this book and always find it lacking. NOTE 1: If you read this book and find it does not captivate you, then there's no hope for you, and you may look upon yourself as a truly sorry case. NOTE 2: If you look up the word "adventure" you will find listed in the dictionary as its definition "circumstances that follow the plot of Treasure Island." As it turns out, I have read and enjoyed many books since my dad first read Treasure Island aloud to me many years ago, but nevertheless there is some truth to what Bluedom wrote. Certainly Treasure Island is the essential pirate story, and was instrumental in creating the modern mythos of the backstabbing buccaneer. But I would give it a higher accolade than that, and say that it is one of those great books that attains perfection within the bounds of its genre and, in doing so, transcends the genre. Thus, though it is often referred to as a "boy's adventure story," it can be enjoyed at all ages. Not all of my childhood favorites have held up as I've grown older, but this has. One of the reasons is Stevenson's writing. It's perfect. As G. K. Chesterton once wrote, "he seemed to pick the right word up on the point of his pen ... there was a kind of swordsmanship about it." While his prose may have been richer in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the man always had an unfailing sense of atmosphere, and here every paragraph seems to be steeped in sea salt. I find the haunting introduction of "Captain" Billy Bones particularly well done: I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow; a tall, strong, heavy nut-brown man; his tarry pigtail falling over the shoulders of his soiled blue coat; his hands ragged and scarred, with black, broken nails; and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid white. And then there is Long John Silver, one of those larger-than-life figures who has long since assumed a life beyond what his author intended for him. We tend to think of Silver now as being menacing from the very start of the story (due, no doubt, to actors such as Orson Welles and Tim Curry playing the role on screen), but he is first introduced to us as a lovable old cook with impeccable manners ... and he retains those impeccable manners right up until the end of the book, with only occasional glimpses of his true ruthlessness. The conversations between him and Jim Hawkins (our narrator/hero, an honest and likeable lad) are masterpieces of manipulative wordplay. My favorite part of the book, however, has to be the "Israel Hands" chapter. The situation is very complicated, and the tension incredible. Here are two characters who must work together to safely navigate a ship. At the same time, Jim knows that the wounded Israel is armed and plotting to kill him. And as they work, they talk about ghosts, morality, and the afterlife. ‎"Well," said I, "I'll cut you some tobacco; but if I was you and thought myself so badly, I would go to my prayers, like a Christian man." "Why?" said he. "Now, you tell me why." "Why?" I cried. "You were asking me just now about the dead. You've broken your trust; you've lived in sin and lies and blood; there's a man you killed lying at your feet this moment; and you ask me why! For God's mercy, Mr. Hands, that's why." My only complaint with the book is that the ending is rushed and less exciting than I remember. But that is a minor flaw. I could go on and on about Treasure Island, but I'll spare you. If you wish to know more, you must read it yourself.
Most helpful negative review
1 customers found this helpful
Never having been a fa...
Never having been a fan of the pirate genre I entered communication with Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island, one of its pillars, with some trepidation especially since as the author's biographer Claire Harmon notes like his Jekyl and Hyde, it's so well known that it hardly requires being read at all, "Long John Silver is more real to most people than any historical buccaneer." I'd like to offer a narrative of rediscovering the genre, but young Jim Hawkins is such a greedy, repellent narrator and the various pirates so difficult to understand and the story points so subtly telegraphed, I was less thrilled than appalled. That Silver and Gunn are the most entertaining figures it does go without saying, but as Harmon hints because their old bones have been resurrected so many times since, the original now seems prosaic and slothful. But such things are not Stevenson's fault, of course.
1-5 of 152 reviews

When I was a child I w...

When I was a child I would often peruse a little pamphlet my parents owned. It was titled Hand that Rocks the Cradle and featured "a select list of books to read to children." Most of the commentary about the selections was straightforward and a little bit dull, but I've never forgotten what Mr. Bluedom had to say about Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island. WARNING: If you read this book you may not be able to enjoy any other book again because you will subconsciously compare it to the perfection of this book and always find it lacking. NOTE 1: If you read this book and find it does not captivate you, then there's no hope for you, and you may look upon yourself as a truly sorry case. NOTE 2: If you look up the word "adventure" you will find listed in the dictionary as its definition "circumstances that follow the plot of Treasure Island." As it turns out, I have read and enjoyed many books since my dad first read Treasure Island aloud to me many years ago, but nevertheless there is some truth to what Bluedom wrote. Certainly Treasure Island is the essential pirate story, and was instrumental in creating the modern mythos of the backstabbing buccaneer. But I would give it a higher accolade than that, and say that it is one of those great books that attains perfection within the bounds of its genre and, in doing so, transcends the genre. Thus, though it is often referred to as a "boy's adventure story," it can be enjoyed at all ages. Not all of my childhood favorites have held up as I've grown older, but this has. One of the reasons is Stevenson's writing. It's perfect. As G. K. Chesterton once wrote, "he seemed to pick the right word up on the point of his pen ... there was a kind of swordsmanship about it." While his prose may have been richer in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the man always had an unfailing sense of atmosphere, and here every paragraph seems to be steeped in sea salt. I find the haunting introduction of "Captain" Billy Bones particularly well done: I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow; a tall, strong, heavy nut-brown man; his tarry pigtail falling over the shoulders of his soiled blue coat; his hands ragged and scarred, with black, broken nails; and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid white. And then there is Long John Silver, one of those larger-than-life figures who has long since assumed a life beyond what his author intended for him. We tend to think of Silver now as being menacing from the very start of the story (due, no doubt, to actors such as Orson Welles and Tim Curry playing the role on screen), but he is first introduced to us as a lovable old cook with impeccable manners ... and he retains those impeccable manners right up until the end of the book, with only occasional glimpses of his true ruthlessness. The conversations between him and Jim Hawkins (our narrator/hero, an honest and likeable lad) are masterpieces of manipulative wordplay. My favorite part of the book, however, has to be the "Israel Hands" chapter. The situation is very complicated, and the tension incredible. Here are two characters who must work together to safely navigate a ship. At the same time, Jim knows that the wounded Israel is armed and plotting to kill him. And as they work, they talk about ghosts, morality, and the afterlife. ‎"Well," said I, "I'll cut you some tobacco; but if I was you and thought myself so badly, I would go to my prayers, like a Christian man." "Why?" said he. "Now, you tell me why." "Why?" I cried. "You were asking me just now about the dead. You've broken your trust; you've lived in sin and lies and blood; there's a man you killed lying at your feet this moment; and you ask me why! For God's mercy, Mr. Hands, that's why." My only complaint with the book is that the ending is rushed and less exciting than I remember. But that is a minor flaw. I could go on and on about Treasure Island, but I'll spare you. If you wish to know more, you must read it yourself.

Treasure Island Treas...

Treasure Island Treasure Island is a great book and like many great books, grew out of a small act. Stevenson's step-son was drawing one day and his step-father looking over his shoulder, saw that he was drawing a map. They spent the day naming the places and colouring it. And from the map came the book. It is a simple story told by a boy on the cusp of manhood and therein lies its power. Jim Hawkins is a boy telling a story to other boys and his nature is reflected in the telling. There is no navel gazing or reflection in him, he doesn't agonize over killing or worry about the morality of taking buried treasure. Unlike his contemporaries in Victorian fiction, whose scruples often verge on the priggish, Jim's moral compass is personal, his loyalty to his mother and to his friends. His is a conscience rooted in the eighteenth century, his goals are clear and their simplicity and single mindedness drive the story forward. But even in this celebration of the 18th century love affair with laissez faire capitalism, Stephenson finds a place for evil. It is a grinning, grubby, chatty evil, far removed from the starkly painted moral monsters of children's fiction. Long John Silver is a murderer, a pirate and a scoundrel, but he is also charming, capable and a leader of men. Jim enjoys his company despite himself. Though Jim hates Silver for his cruelty, he admires him for his daring as all boys admire those who defy parental or scholastic authority with panache. In some ways there is little to choose between Long John and Jim, both pursue the treasure, Long John is simply willing to use brutal means to obtain it. The Jim we meet at the beginning of the novel is a boy, bound to his mother and weighed down by childish things. By the end, he has encountered dangers, both moral and physical, and survived. He has mastered new skills and entered man's estate. For the rest of us, reading Treasure Island could be considered a vital part of that passage.

Adventure can rely on ...

Adventure can rely on character. Robert Lewis Stevenson demonstrates this in his classic novel Treasure Island. There's plenty of adventure in Treasure Island: mysterious strangers arrive on stormy nights; innocent people survive savage attacks; abandoned ships drift out to sea; pirates climb the walls of forts under the cover of darkness to attack sleeping innocents; castaways, marooned for years, are rescued; fortunes are found and lost again. But what the reader walks away from Treasure Island remembering is the books characters. Long John Silver is the best known, but there are plenty of others, pirates and non-pirates alike. It's these characters that have kept readers coming back to Treasure Island generation after generation. They continue to frighten, to intrigue and to entertain. Illustration by N.C. Wyeth In fact, most of what we know about pirates, we learned from Treasure Island. Pirates have wooden legs and wear eye patches. They walk with a crutch, but in a pinch, they can transform their crutch into a deadly spear. They keep parrots as pets and teach them to say "pieces of eight." When they get together, they can't help but sing "Sixteen men on a dead man's chest/ Yo, ho, ho, and a bottle of rum!" They are charmers, but they cannot be trusted. They terrify us, but we can't help but want to be like them. And we're always a little bit relieved when they get away in the end. Illustration by N.C. Wyeth The menace and magic of Robert Lewis Stevenson's pirates are both captured by N.C. Wyeth's illustrations. The elder Wyeth has been admired by illustrators for generations, and many consider his artwork for Treasure Island to be his best. I don't know enough about the art of illustration to effectively judge N.C. Wyeth, but C.J. and I have developed a few standards in almost 15 years of shared museum going. One is do we believe the figures in the painting existed before the moment of the artwork and will they continue to exist afterwards. I think Wyeth's do. His illustrations capture parts of a larger moment. N.C. Wyeth is also a master of composition. Notice this group of three pirates climbing the walls of the fort. The viewer sees the two on the wall right away, but did you notice the third one who has already entered the fort's shadow? And look at the angle of the mast and the yard arm in the illustration above. There is no steady, level place for Jim to hide in as he climbs the ship's rigging to escape the pirate. Everything is sharp angles and dangerous slanted beams. The only solid right angle in the picture is the horizon off in the distance. Beyond that horizon, the safety of home. I can see why N.C. Wyeth is considered one of the best. His illustrations create characters with lives outside the paintings just as a good author creates characters with lives outside the book they inhabit. Wyeth and Stevenson are wonderful together.

The first time I read ...

The first time I read this book was in fourth grade and I loved it even then. Its definitely one of my favorite classic books and my all time favorite pirate story. Jim Hawkins, the protagonist and main narrator is a thirteen year old boy who many young boys can easily relate to. The characters are vibrant and unique, including Long John Silver, one of the most incredible villains ever created. The story also flows nicely with a only a brief interruption of Jim's narrative in which another character narrates for a couple chapters. However the transition is smooth and doesn't cause confusion. All this together makes this one of my favorites books and I would definitely recommend it to readers of all ages. And I can't say enough about the Word Cloud Classic edition of the book. Imprinted to the front and back of the book are characters' names and quotes from the book and it just looks awesome. Also the movie Treasure Planet based on this book is a really interesting Science Fiction adaption of the story.

Treasure Island be the...

Treasure Island be the title of this tome and the writer be Cap'n Robert Louis Stevenson! In this adventure set on the high seas, the reader be interduced to the young lad Jim Hawkins, who finds himself in possession of the map to an island filled with buried treasure. Young Jim be recruited as a cabin boy and joins a crew of seasoned sailors lookin' to seek out the loot, and amid these salty dogs is the one legged cook - known by the fearsome name of Long John Silver. Yarr! It be no surprise that Jim overhears Long John Silver plannin' a mutiny but the young lad must take it upon himself to thwart the plans of the filthy pirate, keepin' the treasure and the honest crew members safe. Cap'n Stevenson does a fine job with this swarthy tale of swashbuckling adventure. Older readers as well as the wee little ones will find this story to be a great way to be passin' the time while out at sea. From the parrot that skwaks out "Pieces o' eight" to the singin' of the pirate song "yo ho ho and a bottle o' rum", this story be havin' all a buccaneer could want and rightfully earns its place as a classic. (Quick disclaimer: I wrote this review for my blog for Talk Like a Pirate Day. Please forgive my grammar and salty dialect as I only take one out of 365 days to actually talk like a pirate!)

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Electrode, Comp-812497708, DC-prod-az-southcentralus-14, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-30.0.3, SHA-fe0221a6ef49da0ab2505dfeca6fe7a05293b900, CID-e0dc5ab1-b5c-16e5bff706e429, Generated: Mon, 11 Nov 2019 19:44:58 GMT