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The Recipe Club : A Novel about Food and Friendship

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3.6 out of 5 stars
33 total reviews
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Most helpful positive review
From the time I picked up "The Recipe Club" by Andrea Israel & Nancy Garfinkel I never could stop reading without getting the jitters to get back to this book. It's such a powerful book about friendship, family and just plain life. Valerie and Lilly write to each other for years. Included in the letters are wonderful recipes. These recipes seem to fit whatever is happening in their life or whatever they are thinking about at that time or not thinking about at that time. So, there are recipes named: Conspiracy Apple pie, Chocolate-dipped cookies and Opera cake with more recipes I haven't named. Val and Lilly are totally different in temperament. In the early years Lilly is anxious to break free and experience life. She doesn't necessarily need a friend's support. She wonders what sex is like. She wants to go all the way and soon, like now. Val isn't in such a hurry. She's willing to wait for an oral report from Lilly about that deeper intimacy. She goes to college while Lillypad, this is what Val sometimes calls Lilly. Lilly fights against going to college. These girls have way different personalities. I thought friendship was based on our "shared likes." Well, we aren't given a elementary school reader about how to make a friend. We just fall in to sharing our chocolate chip cookie and peanut butter and jelly sandwich with the little girl or boy who stands close to us during a spelling bee or at recess. We hope in our subconscious this person will magically like what we like to eat, what we like to play and what we like to laugh at on television. I really paid attention when Lilly and Val began to show and speak their differences to one another. Guess what! It is allowable. The friendship won't necessarily fall apart. Friends might grow closer. There are just periods of time out. It is fascinating to read this long correspondence. Because we also learn about each girl's families. Both girls have interesting mothers and fathers. Lilly's mom is a drama queen, actress, runaway wife. While Val's mom is stuck in a painful mental state not able to do or say much to Val without crying or hiding herself for days on end. Lilly's father, Isaac, is a Psychologist, an extrovert. while Val's father is quiet, gentle, almost invisible. I suppose the behaviors of both mothers and fathers explains the Psychology of both Val and Lilly and Ben, Lilly's brother. I loved some of the illustrations in the book. One sticks out to me the red "get out of jail" card. While protesting the Viet Nam war two of these people are thrown in jail. Then, there is the big, red question mark. On the dot of the question mark are the words "Who ARE You?" The question mark is all about one of the girl's not feeling she knows or understands the other girl any longer. There is an identity crisis going on between friends. I could go on and on about "The Recipe Club." I didn't know the olive symbolized patience and peace. Smilingly I admit to not knowing my parents led a life before I entered their world. Have you ever thought about silent trash trucks? When we were small, did we know life could grow so complicated, more complicated than Darwin's Star orchid? Ok, now I can take a deep breath. I already miss Val, Ben and Valerie. Maybe I should write a longhand letter to a friend. That might make me feel better. Oh, in the letter I must include my apple fritter recipe. Great book.

About This Item

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Loyalty, loss, and the ties that bind. These are the ingredients of "The Recipe Club," a "novel cookbook" that combines an authentic story of friendship with more than 80 delicious recipes. The Recipe Club

Specifications

Series Title
Tony Hill and Carol Jordan Series
Publisher
HarperCollins
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
342
Author
Andrea Israel
ISBN-13
9780061992292
Publication Date
September, 2010
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
8.03 x 5.32 x 0.92 Inches
ISBN-10
0061992291

Customer Reviews

5 stars
8
4 stars
10
3 stars
9
2 stars
5
1 star
1
Most helpful positive review
1 customers found this helpful
From the time I picked...
From the time I picked up "The Recipe Club" by Andrea Israel & Nancy Garfinkel I never could stop reading without getting the jitters to get back to this book. It's such a powerful book about friendship, family and just plain life. Valerie and Lilly write to each other for years. Included in the letters are wonderful recipes. These recipes seem to fit whatever is happening in their life or whatever they are thinking about at that time or not thinking about at that time. So, there are recipes named: Conspiracy Apple pie, Chocolate-dipped cookies and Opera cake with more recipes I haven't named. Val and Lilly are totally different in temperament. In the early years Lilly is anxious to break free and experience life. She doesn't necessarily need a friend's support. She wonders what sex is like. She wants to go all the way and soon, like now. Val isn't in such a hurry. She's willing to wait for an oral report from Lilly about that deeper intimacy. She goes to college while Lillypad, this is what Val sometimes calls Lilly. Lilly fights against going to college. These girls have way different personalities. I thought friendship was based on our "shared likes." Well, we aren't given a elementary school reader about how to make a friend. We just fall in to sharing our chocolate chip cookie and peanut butter and jelly sandwich with the little girl or boy who stands close to us during a spelling bee or at recess. We hope in our subconscious this person will magically like what we like to eat, what we like to play and what we like to laugh at on television. I really paid attention when Lilly and Val began to show and speak their differences to one another. Guess what! It is allowable. The friendship won't necessarily fall apart. Friends might grow closer. There are just periods of time out. It is fascinating to read this long correspondence. Because we also learn about each girl's families. Both girls have interesting mothers and fathers. Lilly's mom is a drama queen, actress, runaway wife. While Val's mom is stuck in a painful mental state not able to do or say much to Val without crying or hiding herself for days on end. Lilly's father, Isaac, is a Psychologist, an extrovert. while Val's father is quiet, gentle, almost invisible. I suppose the behaviors of both mothers and fathers explains the Psychology of both Val and Lilly and Ben, Lilly's brother. I loved some of the illustrations in the book. One sticks out to me the red "get out of jail" card. While protesting the Viet Nam war two of these people are thrown in jail. Then, there is the big, red question mark. On the dot of the question mark are the words "Who ARE You?" The question mark is all about one of the girl's not feeling she knows or understands the other girl any longer. There is an identity crisis going on between friends. I could go on and on about "The Recipe Club." I didn't know the olive symbolized patience and peace. Smilingly I admit to not knowing my parents led a life before I entered their world. Have you ever thought about silent trash trucks? When we were small, did we know life could grow so complicated, more complicated than Darwin's Star orchid? Ok, now I can take a deep breath. I already miss Val, Ben and Valerie. Maybe I should write a longhand letter to a friend. That might make me feel better. Oh, in the letter I must include my apple fritter recipe. Great book.
Most helpful negative review
2 customers found this helpful
The most basic require...
The most basic requirement the successful author of fiction must meet is to make her work believable. If you're writing pure fantasy like The Prophecy of Zephyrus, a future yet to come or a world that does not exist, this is a relatively easy burden to meet. The minute you choose to set your fiction in a historical time period, however, you are writing historical fiction and must then present history accurately in order to make your writing believable. And the closer the time period about which you are writing is to the time in which you write, the more diligent you must be, because there will always be someone like me who remembers the time period about which you write in some detail. And so we come to The Recipe Club: A Tale of Food and Friendship, the story of two women, friends as young girls, now reconnecting in adulthood. The reader first meets the younger Silly & Valerie in a series of pen letters the girls have exchanged beginning on April 2, 1964, as the girls are looking forward to their twelfth birthdays. Almost immediately authors Israel & Garfinkel commit the ultimate fiction failure. By May 4 the girls are talking about a proposed trip to the theater to see Fiddler on the Roof. Fiddler on the Roof would not even open on Broadway until September 22, 1964. There is something very special about 1964 however, something that every 12 year old girl in the United States would have been all agog over, because 1964 was the year of the British Invasion, the year that teens of my generation first heard of The Beatles, the Dave Clark Five & the Rolling Stone. From the time the Beatles first appeared on Ed Sullivan on February 9, 1964, they became the main topic of musical conversation for American teens. Fiddler? Who knew - and nobody cared. On August 2, 1964, Silly Lillypad writes to Val at camp, telling her that her mother's "new friend Angelo" had given her "purple bell bottoms, an orange mid-riff shirt . . . and a beaded headband". Sorry - not in this lifetime or that one. In 1964 Jackie Kennedy was still setting fashion trends for American women. It would be nearly two years before the male members of my generation won the right to grow their hair below their earlobes (my friend Larry took gym with the girls in a girl's gym suit and a pink hair net for an entire year and a half because he would not cut his hair!) and teen girls all over the country were still getting detentions for raising their hems over their knees. Bell bottoms, midriff shirts and beaded head bands were the teen uniform of the early 70's, not 1964. And even then, those bell bottoms were invariably jeans, not purple. Over and over, on nearly every page, I found myself dropping this book mid-sentence to double check my memory against the available record. At the most basic level - historical believability - The Recipe Club is an abject failure. Let me further comment on the included recipes, which according to the authors were especially designed for this project. Those, too, are often inappropriate for the time period, adding to the unbelievability of this book. Recipe collecting teens of the 1960s & 1970s (I was one) would have generally acquired their recipes from Home Economics class, the Betsy McCall column in McCall's magazine, Ask Susan in Good Housekeeping or the recipe column of the local newspaper. Rural teens would have also had access to 4H & Farm Journal. There are thousands of still-extant exemplars or recipes authentic to the time period. Many of these simply are not. Chicken came whole or cut up, not as just thighs. The grocery store did not carry cilantro and hardly anyone's kitchen had fresh garlic unless it was time to can pickles or the family was Italian. Olive oil was not a common ingredient in most American kitchens and was widely believed to go rancid rapidly along with imparting strange flavors to food. Authentic recipes of the time would have specified vegetable oil or Mazola. Extra-virgin? Virginity was something you lost in the back seat of an Edsel at the drive-in movies, not something you bought in the grocery store. All in all, The Recipe Club is simply unbelievable - distractingly so. Leave it on the shelf.
Most helpful positive review
1 customers found this helpful
From the time I picked...
From the time I picked up "The Recipe Club" by Andrea Israel & Nancy Garfinkel I never could stop reading without getting the jitters to get back to this book. It's such a powerful book about friendship, family and just plain life. Valerie and Lilly write to each other for years. Included in the letters are wonderful recipes. These recipes seem to fit whatever is happening in their life or whatever they are thinking about at that time or not thinking about at that time. So, there are recipes named: Conspiracy Apple pie, Chocolate-dipped cookies and Opera cake with more recipes I haven't named. Val and Lilly are totally different in temperament. In the early years Lilly is anxious to break free and experience life. She doesn't necessarily need a friend's support. She wonders what sex is like. She wants to go all the way and soon, like now. Val isn't in such a hurry. She's willing to wait for an oral report from Lilly about that deeper intimacy. She goes to college while Lillypad, this is what Val sometimes calls Lilly. Lilly fights against going to college. These girls have way different personalities. I thought friendship was based on our "shared likes." Well, we aren't given a elementary school reader about how to make a friend. We just fall in to sharing our chocolate chip cookie and peanut butter and jelly sandwich with the little girl or boy who stands close to us during a spelling bee or at recess. We hope in our subconscious this person will magically like what we like to eat, what we like to play and what we like to laugh at on television. I really paid attention when Lilly and Val began to show and speak their differences to one another. Guess what! It is allowable. The friendship won't necessarily fall apart. Friends might grow closer. There are just periods of time out. It is fascinating to read this long correspondence. Because we also learn about each girl's families. Both girls have interesting mothers and fathers. Lilly's mom is a drama queen, actress, runaway wife. While Val's mom is stuck in a painful mental state not able to do or say much to Val without crying or hiding herself for days on end. Lilly's father, Isaac, is a Psychologist, an extrovert. while Val's father is quiet, gentle, almost invisible. I suppose the behaviors of both mothers and fathers explains the Psychology of both Val and Lilly and Ben, Lilly's brother. I loved some of the illustrations in the book. One sticks out to me the red "get out of jail" card. While protesting the Viet Nam war two of these people are thrown in jail. Then, there is the big, red question mark. On the dot of the question mark are the words "Who ARE You?" The question mark is all about one of the girl's not feeling she knows or understands the other girl any longer. There is an identity crisis going on between friends. I could go on and on about "The Recipe Club." I didn't know the olive symbolized patience and peace. Smilingly I admit to not knowing my parents led a life before I entered their world. Have you ever thought about silent trash trucks? When we were small, did we know life could grow so complicated, more complicated than Darwin's Star orchid? Ok, now I can take a deep breath. I already miss Val, Ben and Valerie. Maybe I should write a longhand letter to a friend. That might make me feel better. Oh, in the letter I must include my apple fritter recipe. Great book.
Most helpful negative review
2 customers found this helpful
The most basic require...
The most basic requirement the successful author of fiction must meet is to make her work believable. If you're writing pure fantasy like The Prophecy of Zephyrus, a future yet to come or a world that does not exist, this is a relatively easy burden to meet. The minute you choose to set your fiction in a historical time period, however, you are writing historical fiction and must then present history accurately in order to make your writing believable. And the closer the time period about which you are writing is to the time in which you write, the more diligent you must be, because there will always be someone like me who remembers the time period about which you write in some detail. And so we come to The Recipe Club: A Tale of Food and Friendship, the story of two women, friends as young girls, now reconnecting in adulthood. The reader first meets the younger Silly & Valerie in a series of pen letters the girls have exchanged beginning on April 2, 1964, as the girls are looking forward to their twelfth birthdays. Almost immediately authors Israel & Garfinkel commit the ultimate fiction failure. By May 4 the girls are talking about a proposed trip to the theater to see Fiddler on the Roof. Fiddler on the Roof would not even open on Broadway until September 22, 1964. There is something very special about 1964 however, something that every 12 year old girl in the United States would have been all agog over, because 1964 was the year of the British Invasion, the year that teens of my generation first heard of The Beatles, the Dave Clark Five & the Rolling Stone. From the time the Beatles first appeared on Ed Sullivan on February 9, 1964, they became the main topic of musical conversation for American teens. Fiddler? Who knew - and nobody cared. On August 2, 1964, Silly Lillypad writes to Val at camp, telling her that her mother's "new friend Angelo" had given her "purple bell bottoms, an orange mid-riff shirt . . . and a beaded headband". Sorry - not in this lifetime or that one. In 1964 Jackie Kennedy was still setting fashion trends for American women. It would be nearly two years before the male members of my generation won the right to grow their hair below their earlobes (my friend Larry took gym with the girls in a girl's gym suit and a pink hair net for an entire year and a half because he would not cut his hair!) and teen girls all over the country were still getting detentions for raising their hems over their knees. Bell bottoms, midriff shirts and beaded head bands were the teen uniform of the early 70's, not 1964. And even then, those bell bottoms were invariably jeans, not purple. Over and over, on nearly every page, I found myself dropping this book mid-sentence to double check my memory against the available record. At the most basic level - historical believability - The Recipe Club is an abject failure. Let me further comment on the included recipes, which according to the authors were especially designed for this project. Those, too, are often inappropriate for the time period, adding to the unbelievability of this book. Recipe collecting teens of the 1960s & 1970s (I was one) would have generally acquired their recipes from Home Economics class, the Betsy McCall column in McCall's magazine, Ask Susan in Good Housekeeping or the recipe column of the local newspaper. Rural teens would have also had access to 4H & Farm Journal. There are thousands of still-extant exemplars or recipes authentic to the time period. Many of these simply are not. Chicken came whole or cut up, not as just thighs. The grocery store did not carry cilantro and hardly anyone's kitchen had fresh garlic unless it was time to can pickles or the family was Italian. Olive oil was not a common ingredient in most American kitchens and was widely believed to go rancid rapidly along with imparting strange flavors to food. Authentic recipes of the time would have specified vegetable oil or Mazola. Extra-virgin? Virginity was something you lost in the back seat of an Edsel at the drive-in movies, not something you bought in the grocery store. All in all, The Recipe Club is simply unbelievable - distractingly so. Leave it on the shelf.
1-5 of 33 reviews

From the time I picked...

From the time I picked up "The Recipe Club" by Andrea Israel & Nancy Garfinkel I never could stop reading without getting the jitters to get back to this book. It's such a powerful book about friendship, family and just plain life. Valerie and Lilly write to each other for years. Included in the letters are wonderful recipes. These recipes seem to fit whatever is happening in their life or whatever they are thinking about at that time or not thinking about at that time. So, there are recipes named: Conspiracy Apple pie, Chocolate-dipped cookies and Opera cake with more recipes I haven't named. Val and Lilly are totally different in temperament. In the early years Lilly is anxious to break free and experience life. She doesn't necessarily need a friend's support. She wonders what sex is like. She wants to go all the way and soon, like now. Val isn't in such a hurry. She's willing to wait for an oral report from Lilly about that deeper intimacy. She goes to college while Lillypad, this is what Val sometimes calls Lilly. Lilly fights against going to college. These girls have way different personalities. I thought friendship was based on our "shared likes." Well, we aren't given a elementary school reader about how to make a friend. We just fall in to sharing our chocolate chip cookie and peanut butter and jelly sandwich with the little girl or boy who stands close to us during a spelling bee or at recess. We hope in our subconscious this person will magically like what we like to eat, what we like to play and what we like to laugh at on television. I really paid attention when Lilly and Val began to show and speak their differences to one another. Guess what! It is allowable. The friendship won't necessarily fall apart. Friends might grow closer. There are just periods of time out. It is fascinating to read this long correspondence. Because we also learn about each girl's families. Both girls have interesting mothers and fathers. Lilly's mom is a drama queen, actress, runaway wife. While Val's mom is stuck in a painful mental state not able to do or say much to Val without crying or hiding herself for days on end. Lilly's father, Isaac, is a Psychologist, an extrovert. while Val's father is quiet, gentle, almost invisible. I suppose the behaviors of both mothers and fathers explains the Psychology of both Val and Lilly and Ben, Lilly's brother. I loved some of the illustrations in the book. One sticks out to me the red "get out of jail" card. While protesting the Viet Nam war two of these people are thrown in jail. Then, there is the big, red question mark. On the dot of the question mark are the words "Who ARE You?" The question mark is all about one of the girl's not feeling she knows or understands the other girl any longer. There is an identity crisis going on between friends. I could go on and on about "The Recipe Club." I didn't know the olive symbolized patience and peace. Smilingly I admit to not knowing my parents led a life before I entered their world. Have you ever thought about silent trash trucks? When we were small, did we know life could grow so complicated, more complicated than Darwin's Star orchid? Ok, now I can take a deep breath. I already miss Val, Ben and Valerie. Maybe I should write a longhand letter to a friend. That might make me feel better. Oh, in the letter I must include my apple fritter recipe. Great book.

The Recipe Club is one...

The Recipe Club is one of those books that grabs your attention and does not let go. If I didn't have to work full time and tend to two children, I would have finished this one in one sitting, instead, I read it in two. Lilly and Val are lifelong friends who haven't spoken in 26 years due to a falling out. Lilly is outgoing, flirty and dramatic, Val is the shy one, who tends to have her nose in a book and feels insecure most of the time. In April of 2000, when Val's mother passes away, she emails Lilly, who is thrilled to hear from her long lost friend. The two women begin to email back and forth, but while they are catching up and reminiscing, they begin to argue once again over the same old issues that broke up their friendship up in the first place. The book is written in the form of the womens' letters to each other. When the girls were tweens in the mid 1960's, they formed what they called 'The Recipe Club', and as they wrote to each other, they included a recipe with nearly each letter. So as you are reading the letters, you get a different recipe to go along with it. Recipes like First-Kiss Caramel Almond Kisses, Starry Night Scampi and Missing You Warmly Lentil Salad. This book reads like non-fiction, you get the feeling that you are really reading the correspondence between these two friends. I really enjoyed this book and am so happy I got a chance to read it. I highly recommend it! I liked both Val and Lilly, and I liked reading about thier lives through the letters they sent each other. This book also has a great twist in the end that took me totally off guard. This one will be on my top favorites for 2010.

The Recipe Club: A Tal...

The Recipe Club: A Tale of Food and Friendship is an interesting book that is seperated into 3 or 4 sections. The first is a story of 2 mid-age women reconnecting their friendship after one of their mothers passes away. This is told through an e-mail format. When they realize that they are too different and their friendship can not be what it once was, we look int the past and their background story is told through pen pal letters (and recipes). The story is then moved back the present day and told much like a regular book, going back and forth between the 2 women. Lastly, the story is then told through e-mail format again, in the present day. Because I was not expecting the e-mail format at the beginning (nor the pen pal letters in the middle), it took me sometime to start reading the book. But one I began, I learned that I loved the characters and it was a very quick read.

All of us in our lifet...

All of us in our lifetime have somehow "misplaced" a friend or someone who was extremely important at one time in our lives. This is the story of two women who were best friends, who helped each other through puberty, adolescence, and much more and then due to a miscommunication, lost that closeness and drifted apart. Lilly and Val are two enormously different people and yet you see, in this book, how a friendship that was forged in childhood could be integrated into adulthood. They shared everything, their differences and their similarities and struggled through the errors that we all make as we grow up. I loved this book. I received it and I am so proud that this book was a first giveaway on my book blog. It was delightful, so much so that I couldn't put it down which is something that happens rarely for me. The story is told in the form of letters and e-mails and the Recipes that are included sound absolutely scrumptious. Makes me want to start a recipe club myself. My only problem with this book was trying to decide where to shelve it - cookbooks or fiction - it would fit either.

This is a big, gorgeou...

This is a big, gorgeous, appealing mix of a book. It's an epistolary novel. It has recipes. It has pictures and doodles. In short, it is a beautifully designed, lovely feeling book. All of it wrapped up together should have equalled a book I'd rave over. And it was good, it just wasn't great. Opening with childhood friends Lilly and Val reconnecting after years of silence, the friends start exchanging e-mails, thrilled to be speaking again. Until they have to face the issue that originally tore them apart, where it becomes obvious that each is still laboring under a cloud of hurt and recrimination and their versions of what destroyed their friendship in the first place are diametrically opposed. Before things get acrimonious between them again, they did recall fondly the Recipe Club they created as children whereby they sent each other letters and recipes on a regular basis. The second part of the book takes the reader back to the beginnings of the Recipe Club and to the innocent times of their childhood. As they exchange letters through the years, their characters are revealed more fully as are their perceptions of their parents and others around them. The recipes included with the letters refer to something discussed in the letter or created as a reaction to an event. And the letters from these girls turning into young women continue on until the betrayal that is too big to be forgiven. The third section of the book initially eschews the letter and e-mail format of the previous sections, instead using third person narration whereby Val discovers that Lilly's father has passed away. And this is the catalyst for a second reconnection between the women and the exposure of an explosive secret that changes everything. Lilly and Val must come to understand and forgive events far beyond their own control if they want to have any kind of relationship at all. I love the premise of the book and the presentation but I thought the letters exchanged by the girls early on were a bit too sophisticated and in depth for their ages. I wrote letters to friends from the time I was in 3rd grade and saved all of their letters to me and the letters from Lilly and Val seem far more introspective and thoughtful than the letters my friends and I exchanged. The argument could certainly be made that Lilly and Val were just more sophisticated girls than my friends and I were but the fact that the letters never change in tone or point to emotional maturation on Lilly and Val's parts would then be incredibly troubling given their ages at the start of their Recipe Club. The narrative arc of the story is well managed and the gaps in the narrative, while frustrating, would be true of a friendship based mainly on letters. As time went on in the story, the recipes did become more sophisticated, as would be expected. I flagged many of the recipes and they look really tasty. The theme of family and friendship and how they are created and maintained, how they inform and shape a person, and how they can break down is strong here. Having lost several very close friends over the years, I empathized with Lilly and Val's plight. But I had a tough time getting past Val's neediness and Lilly's superiority. Obviously this is a personal reaction to the characters as they are drawn and other readers might react entirely differently. I so wanted to be wowed by this book but was left vaguely disappointed and feeling just a little flat.

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Electrode, Comp-812502114, DC-prod-az-southcentralus-17, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-30.0.0, SHA-4c05261de7b7524702d8d137579365498522abc0, CID-e9e6b97a-449-16dec0132fed7b, Generated: Mon, 21 Oct 2019 01:49:24 GMT