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The Nixie's Song

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A brand-new cycle of the "New York Times" bestselling Spiderwick Chronicles begins. Eleven-year-old Nicholas Vargas moves with his newly remarried father into the soon-to-be-completed Mangrove Hollow in Florida. But an expedition to a nearby lake turns up a little nixie with a giant problem. Illustrations.

Customer Review Snapshot

3.9 out of 5 stars
14 total reviews
5 stars
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Most helpful positive review
My Spiderwick-loving heart was delighted to discover that Holly Black and Tony DiTerlizzi had teamed up again for another small series set in the Spiderwick world. This trilogy begins with a new family, different from the Grace children in character and personality, but similar in messed up family dynamics. The third person narrator focuses on Nicholas's perspective. He and his older brother Jules and his father have dealt with the death of Nick's mom, but now Nick's dad is moving on; in fact, he has remarried, and Nick is not too happy about having a new stepmother and stepsister. Especially since Laurie, his sister, is his age and completely unlike him. Nick likes to play video games and Laurie is into fairies. He likes his old room and Laurie has taken it. Worst of all, she seems excited about the new marriage, and Nick just wishes that it had never happened. His dad wants Nick to play nice, though, so he has to join her on her fairy hunt through their new housing development that his dad is building. Laurie owns the Spiderwick Field Guide to the Fantastical World Around You, and is using information from the book to search for clues to any fairy presence. When Nick finds a four leaf clover (which Laurie told him will give him the Sight) he decides to keep it a secret. He skips out on Laurie because her antics become too far-fetched for him to handle, but later that night, when he sees a body on the lawn, he worries that Laurie may have been hurt in his absence. He dashes outside, only to discover that the body is not Laurie's, and is not even human. It's a water nixie. For help. he has to enlist the only person who has any knowledge about this crazy stuff: his stepsister. Suddenly they are bound together in their secret knowledge. After rescuing Taloa, the water nixie, she entreats them to find her missing sisters. Nick wants to refuse, but that becomes difficult when Taloa summons a wakened giant with her singing. Now Nick and Laurie have no choice but to agree to help Taloa, along with dealing the giant sitting in their backyard. Once again, Black does a fantastic job of melding together fairy adventures with family problems that are real issues for many children in today's society. The result is tension that impacts not only the plot of the novel, but the characters themselves. I was just as eager to see how Nick and Laurie would resolve some of the issues in their relationship as I was to see how they would fix their giant situation. Also, the family background makes the children more likable, because we can relate to them, we can see where their flaws are coming from, we know that they are good people dealing with some bad history, and we want them to grow past it. I like stories where people rebuild a family structure after life has shattered what they once had; I like the hope and the love that is integral to that process. Since this is the first in a trilogy, I know I'll have to wait until the conclusion of all three books to see significant changes in the family dynamics, but the story rightly starts with Nick and Laurie's relationship, as these two are at the core of the action. And the action is wonderful, too. The integration of fairy world into a new housing development in Florida is just fun. The author does a good job of making me believe that kids could really find these kind of creatures. The giant looks like a hill to anyone else, and the nixies hide in ponds and lakes and streams, and their songs sound like the chorus of outdoor animals. That is, to people without the sight. Once Nick and Laurie find the secret, their world is transformed. Lucky for the reader, we get the sight along with them, thanks to DiTerlizzi's beautiful drawings that liberally accompany the story. His artwork is fantastic. I am probably using too many positive superlatives, but they are indicators of how much I like this book, and all the Spiderwick entries. I saw on DiTerlizzi's website that he and Holly Black are too busy with other projects to consider any new collaborations, and that makes me sad, because I would be ecstatic to see more stories set in the Spiderwick world. Other children could buy the Field Guide and find fairies, all over the place. The possibilities for ideas are abundant! I hope some day the writers have just as much a desire to create more books as I have to read them.

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A brand-new cycle of the "New York Times" bestselling Spiderwick Chronicles begins. Eleven-year-old Nicholas Vargas moves with his newly remarried father into the soon-to-be-completed Mangrove Hollow in Florida. But an expedition to a nearby lake turns up a little nixie with a giant problem. Illustrations. Publishers Weekly,Spiderwick creators Black and DiTerlizzi reopen the book on their popular faerie setting with this slim but entertaining meta-story, kicking off the spin-off series, Beyond the Spiderwick Chronicles. Nick Vargas is in a serious funk after the death of his mother, and it's only made worse when his father remarries and he ends up with a new sister, Laurie (who "seemed to be proud to be the lamest person alive"). Laurie is obsessed with faeries, thanks to her well-worn copy of Black and DiTerlizzi's Arthur Spiderwick's Field Guide to the Fantastical World Around You. Nick doesn't believe they are real, of course, until he picks up a four-leaf clover-and spies a wounded nixie in his yard. The new siblings help the nixie, Taloa, back to the water, and promise to help her find her missing sisters. In their search they find the bodies of three nixies-and a fire-breathing dirt giant that appears to be responsible both for the nixies' deaths and the destruction of a large section of the woods. Stumped about how to defeat the giant, they head to a book signing where they meet Black and DiTerlizzi (who turn out to be utterly unhelpful). In a fortunate twist, however, they meet Jared and Simon, the original series' protagonists, who prove more than willing to help. The illustrations are as charming as always, and the text zips along; Black manages to carefully balance the terror of having a dirt giant threaten your house and the equally horrible prospect of having to share a bedroom with a girl. Ages 7-up. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved,Publishers Weekly,Publishers Weekly,Spiderwick creators Black and DiTerlizzi reopen the book on their popular faerie setting with this slim but entertaining meta-story, kicking off the spin-off series, Beyond the Spiderwick Chronicles. Nick Vargas is in a serious funk after the death of his mother, and it's only made worse when his father remarries and he ends up with a new sister, Laurie (who "seemed to be proud to be the lamest person alive"). Laurie is obsessed with faeries, thanks to her well-worn copy of Black and DiTerlizzi's Arthur Spiderwick's Field Guide to the Fantastical World Around You. Nick doesn't believe they are real, of course, until he picks up a four-leaf clover-and spies a wounded nixie in his yard. The new siblings help the nixie, Taloa, back to the water, and promise to help her find her missing sisters. In their search they find the bodies of three nixies-and a fire-breathing dirt giant that appears to be responsible both for the nixies' deaths and the destruction of a large section of the woods. Stumped about how to defeat the giant, they head to a book signing where they meet Black and DiTerlizzi (who turn out to be utterly unhelpful). In a fortunate twist, however, they meet Jared and Simon, the original series' protagonists, who prove more than willing to help. The illustrations are as charming as always, and the text zips along; Black manages to carefully balance the terror of having a dirt giant threaten your house and the equally horrible prospect of having to share a bedroom with a girl. Ages 7-up. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Specifications

Series Title
Beyond the Spiderwick Chronicles
Publisher
Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Book Format
Hardcover
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
192
Author
Tony DiTerlizzi, Holly Black
ISBN-13
9780689871313
Publication Date
September, 2007
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
6.75 x 4.50 x 0.60 Inches
ISBN-10
0689871317

Customer Reviews

5 stars
4
4 stars
5
3 stars
4
2 stars
1
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
My Spiderwick-loving h...
My Spiderwick-loving heart was delighted to discover that Holly Black and Tony DiTerlizzi had teamed up again for another small series set in the Spiderwick world. This trilogy begins with a new family, different from the Grace children in character and personality, but similar in messed up family dynamics. The third person narrator focuses on Nicholas's perspective. He and his older brother Jules and his father have dealt with the death of Nick's mom, but now Nick's dad is moving on; in fact, he has remarried, and Nick is not too happy about having a new stepmother and stepsister. Especially since Laurie, his sister, is his age and completely unlike him. Nick likes to play video games and Laurie is into fairies. He likes his old room and Laurie has taken it. Worst of all, she seems excited about the new marriage, and Nick just wishes that it had never happened. His dad wants Nick to play nice, though, so he has to join her on her fairy hunt through their new housing development that his dad is building. Laurie owns the Spiderwick Field Guide to the Fantastical World Around You, and is using information from the book to search for clues to any fairy presence. When Nick finds a four leaf clover (which Laurie told him will give him the Sight) he decides to keep it a secret. He skips out on Laurie because her antics become too far-fetched for him to handle, but later that night, when he sees a body on the lawn, he worries that Laurie may have been hurt in his absence. He dashes outside, only to discover that the body is not Laurie's, and is not even human. It's a water nixie. For help. he has to enlist the only person who has any knowledge about this crazy stuff: his stepsister. Suddenly they are bound together in their secret knowledge. After rescuing Taloa, the water nixie, she entreats them to find her missing sisters. Nick wants to refuse, but that becomes difficult when Taloa summons a wakened giant with her singing. Now Nick and Laurie have no choice but to agree to help Taloa, along with dealing the giant sitting in their backyard. Once again, Black does a fantastic job of melding together fairy adventures with family problems that are real issues for many children in today's society. The result is tension that impacts not only the plot of the novel, but the characters themselves. I was just as eager to see how Nick and Laurie would resolve some of the issues in their relationship as I was to see how they would fix their giant situation. Also, the family background makes the children more likable, because we can relate to them, we can see where their flaws are coming from, we know that they are good people dealing with some bad history, and we want them to grow past it. I like stories where people rebuild a family structure after life has shattered what they once had; I like the hope and the love that is integral to that process. Since this is the first in a trilogy, I know I'll have to wait until the conclusion of all three books to see significant changes in the family dynamics, but the story rightly starts with Nick and Laurie's relationship, as these two are at the core of the action. And the action is wonderful, too. The integration of fairy world into a new housing development in Florida is just fun. The author does a good job of making me believe that kids could really find these kind of creatures. The giant looks like a hill to anyone else, and the nixies hide in ponds and lakes and streams, and their songs sound like the chorus of outdoor animals. That is, to people without the sight. Once Nick and Laurie find the secret, their world is transformed. Lucky for the reader, we get the sight along with them, thanks to DiTerlizzi's beautiful drawings that liberally accompany the story. His artwork is fantastic. I am probably using too many positive superlatives, but they are indicators of how much I like this book, and all the Spiderwick entries. I saw on DiTerlizzi's website that he and Holly Black are too busy with other projects to consider any new collaborations, and that makes me sad, because I would be ecstatic to see more stories set in the Spiderwick world. Other children could buy the Field Guide and find fairies, all over the place. The possibilities for ideas are abundant! I hope some day the writers have just as much a desire to create more books as I have to read them.
Most helpful negative review
I really disliked how ...
I really disliked how Jared was portrayed in this book. Immensely.
Most helpful positive review
My Spiderwick-loving h...
My Spiderwick-loving heart was delighted to discover that Holly Black and Tony DiTerlizzi had teamed up again for another small series set in the Spiderwick world. This trilogy begins with a new family, different from the Grace children in character and personality, but similar in messed up family dynamics. The third person narrator focuses on Nicholas's perspective. He and his older brother Jules and his father have dealt with the death of Nick's mom, but now Nick's dad is moving on; in fact, he has remarried, and Nick is not too happy about having a new stepmother and stepsister. Especially since Laurie, his sister, is his age and completely unlike him. Nick likes to play video games and Laurie is into fairies. He likes his old room and Laurie has taken it. Worst of all, she seems excited about the new marriage, and Nick just wishes that it had never happened. His dad wants Nick to play nice, though, so he has to join her on her fairy hunt through their new housing development that his dad is building. Laurie owns the Spiderwick Field Guide to the Fantastical World Around You, and is using information from the book to search for clues to any fairy presence. When Nick finds a four leaf clover (which Laurie told him will give him the Sight) he decides to keep it a secret. He skips out on Laurie because her antics become too far-fetched for him to handle, but later that night, when he sees a body on the lawn, he worries that Laurie may have been hurt in his absence. He dashes outside, only to discover that the body is not Laurie's, and is not even human. It's a water nixie. For help. he has to enlist the only person who has any knowledge about this crazy stuff: his stepsister. Suddenly they are bound together in their secret knowledge. After rescuing Taloa, the water nixie, she entreats them to find her missing sisters. Nick wants to refuse, but that becomes difficult when Taloa summons a wakened giant with her singing. Now Nick and Laurie have no choice but to agree to help Taloa, along with dealing the giant sitting in their backyard. Once again, Black does a fantastic job of melding together fairy adventures with family problems that are real issues for many children in today's society. The result is tension that impacts not only the plot of the novel, but the characters themselves. I was just as eager to see how Nick and Laurie would resolve some of the issues in their relationship as I was to see how they would fix their giant situation. Also, the family background makes the children more likable, because we can relate to them, we can see where their flaws are coming from, we know that they are good people dealing with some bad history, and we want them to grow past it. I like stories where people rebuild a family structure after life has shattered what they once had; I like the hope and the love that is integral to that process. Since this is the first in a trilogy, I know I'll have to wait until the conclusion of all three books to see significant changes in the family dynamics, but the story rightly starts with Nick and Laurie's relationship, as these two are at the core of the action. And the action is wonderful, too. The integration of fairy world into a new housing development in Florida is just fun. The author does a good job of making me believe that kids could really find these kind of creatures. The giant looks like a hill to anyone else, and the nixies hide in ponds and lakes and streams, and their songs sound like the chorus of outdoor animals. That is, to people without the sight. Once Nick and Laurie find the secret, their world is transformed. Lucky for the reader, we get the sight along with them, thanks to DiTerlizzi's beautiful drawings that liberally accompany the story. His artwork is fantastic. I am probably using too many positive superlatives, but they are indicators of how much I like this book, and all the Spiderwick entries. I saw on DiTerlizzi's website that he and Holly Black are too busy with other projects to consider any new collaborations, and that makes me sad, because I would be ecstatic to see more stories set in the Spiderwick world. Other children could buy the Field Guide and find fairies, all over the place. The possibilities for ideas are abundant! I hope some day the writers have just as much a desire to create more books as I have to read them.
Most helpful negative review
I really disliked how ...
I really disliked how Jared was portrayed in this book. Immensely.
1-5 of 14 reviews

My Spiderwick-loving h...

My Spiderwick-loving heart was delighted to discover that Holly Black and Tony DiTerlizzi had teamed up again for another small series set in the Spiderwick world. This trilogy begins with a new family, different from the Grace children in character and personality, but similar in messed up family dynamics. The third person narrator focuses on Nicholas's perspective. He and his older brother Jules and his father have dealt with the death of Nick's mom, but now Nick's dad is moving on; in fact, he has remarried, and Nick is not too happy about having a new stepmother and stepsister. Especially since Laurie, his sister, is his age and completely unlike him. Nick likes to play video games and Laurie is into fairies. He likes his old room and Laurie has taken it. Worst of all, she seems excited about the new marriage, and Nick just wishes that it had never happened. His dad wants Nick to play nice, though, so he has to join her on her fairy hunt through their new housing development that his dad is building. Laurie owns the Spiderwick Field Guide to the Fantastical World Around You, and is using information from the book to search for clues to any fairy presence. When Nick finds a four leaf clover (which Laurie told him will give him the Sight) he decides to keep it a secret. He skips out on Laurie because her antics become too far-fetched for him to handle, but later that night, when he sees a body on the lawn, he worries that Laurie may have been hurt in his absence. He dashes outside, only to discover that the body is not Laurie's, and is not even human. It's a water nixie. For help. he has to enlist the only person who has any knowledge about this crazy stuff: his stepsister. Suddenly they are bound together in their secret knowledge. After rescuing Taloa, the water nixie, she entreats them to find her missing sisters. Nick wants to refuse, but that becomes difficult when Taloa summons a wakened giant with her singing. Now Nick and Laurie have no choice but to agree to help Taloa, along with dealing the giant sitting in their backyard. Once again, Black does a fantastic job of melding together fairy adventures with family problems that are real issues for many children in today's society. The result is tension that impacts not only the plot of the novel, but the characters themselves. I was just as eager to see how Nick and Laurie would resolve some of the issues in their relationship as I was to see how they would fix their giant situation. Also, the family background makes the children more likable, because we can relate to them, we can see where their flaws are coming from, we know that they are good people dealing with some bad history, and we want them to grow past it. I like stories where people rebuild a family structure after life has shattered what they once had; I like the hope and the love that is integral to that process. Since this is the first in a trilogy, I know I'll have to wait until the conclusion of all three books to see significant changes in the family dynamics, but the story rightly starts with Nick and Laurie's relationship, as these two are at the core of the action. And the action is wonderful, too. The integration of fairy world into a new housing development in Florida is just fun. The author does a good job of making me believe that kids could really find these kind of creatures. The giant looks like a hill to anyone else, and the nixies hide in ponds and lakes and streams, and their songs sound like the chorus of outdoor animals. That is, to people without the sight. Once Nick and Laurie find the secret, their world is transformed. Lucky for the reader, we get the sight along with them, thanks to DiTerlizzi's beautiful drawings that liberally accompany the story. His artwork is fantastic. I am probably using too many positive superlatives, but they are indicators of how much I like this book, and all the Spiderwick entries. I saw on DiTerlizzi's website that he and Holly Black are too busy with other projects to consider any new collaborations, and that makes me sad, because I would be ecstatic to see more stories set in the Spiderwick world. Other children could buy the Field Guide and find fairies, all over the place. The possibilities for ideas are abundant! I hope some day the writers have just as much a desire to create more books as I have to read them.

Eleven-year-old Nichol...

Eleven-year-old Nicholas Vargas has had to make a lot of adjustments since his mother died and their father remarried. For one thing, he has to give up his bedroom to his new stepsister, Laurie. Nicholas doesn't have a lot of patience with Laurie, especially since she believes fairies are real. He tells her that her book about fairies, "Arthur Spiderwick's Field Guide to the Fantastical World Around You" is fiction but she insists that fairies do exist. Much to his surprise, Nicholas finds out that Laurie is right and soon he is involved in adventures far beyond anything he would have imagined. "The Nixie's Song" is the first book in the three-part sequel to the "Spiderwick Chronicles" fantasy series for children. I was a bit wary about reading it, because I was afraid that it wouldn't capture the magic of the first series, but it does a very good job of doing so. It does at times walk a very fine line that could have been dangerous as it blurs the line between fiction and nonfiction - authors Tony DiTerlizzi and Holly Black appear as characters as do Simon and Jared Grace (with Jared playing a big role towards the end of this book) - but it works out fine. The book deals nicely with the real life issue of a young boy struggling with the loss of his mother and his father's remarriage and dealing with a new stepsister. Nick Vargas is a well-written character - he thinks of himself as a bit of a loser, overweight and resentful of losing his bedroom to his new stepsister. His stepsister Laurie is also well written, a young girl who still believes in magic. All of the magical elements are well done especially the Nixie and the Giant. Authors DiTerlizzi and Black have written yet another magical book.

From the Authors of th...

From the Authors of the New York Times bestselling series "the Spiderwick Chronicles". Beyond the Spiderwick Chronicles starts with Book One "The Nixie's Song". Regular kid Nick and his new wacko step sister Laurie, stumble upon the world of the faerie. While Laurie a devout Spiderwick enthusiast is overjoyed to be brought into this fantastical new reality, Nick is horrified by what he discovers namely an injured Nixie. Nick and Laurie decide to help the injured Nixie, and in the process are drug into a heart stopping race to fulfill a pact with fairy creatures to prevent a giant from destroying their home and killing their family. In the tradition of the Spiderwick Chronicles "The Nixie's Song" places regular kids in a fantastical world full of strange creatures and hidden dangers. Where they must be the heroes and protect themselves, and the adult world from the troubles that they alone can see. The action is fast paced and follows unexpected twists and turns. A good read for fans of the Spiderwick Chronicles.

Fans of the original S...

Fans of the original Spiderwick Chronicles will be pleased with this new series where Black and DiTerlizzi bring to life more of their magical creatures. The chapters are short and fast-paced, which will appeal to reluctant readers, and the illustrations are simple yet lovely, as in the first series. The teaser at the end, promising another book, will be all young readers need to keep them reading.

The boys and I really ...

The boys and I really enjoy the Spiderwick Chronicles. I'd say I like the first set of books better than this one, but it was still relatively fun. I did enjoy how the authors poked fun at themselves at one point in the novel. I was also a bit surprised when Jared said a curse word, but as I was reading it out loud to the boys I just edited. Still, they were shocked to hear Jared say "Lard Butt", lol! We'll be starting the next book later this week. We love Spiderwick!

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Electrode, Comp-283025124, DC-prod-dfw7, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-30.0.3-ebf-2, SHA-8c8e8dc1c07e462c80c1b82096c2da2858100078, CID-7abf3b89-ac1-16ef9d54227007, Generated: Thu, 12 Dec 2019 11:18:53 GMT