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The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (UK) (Hardcover)

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A stunning new edition of this timeless classic. This is the best loved of all the Chronicles of Narnia - the first one ever written, and the one everybody remembers reading as a child.

Customer Review Snapshot

4.4 out of 5 stars
241 total reviews
5 stars
127
4 stars
85
3 stars
21
2 stars
4
1 star
4
Most helpful positive review
I really liked this.The Writing and WorldbuildingI absolutely loved the writing style! It was very similar to J.M. Barrie, with fun asides and little comments throughout. Though definitely targeted at children, it is readable and enjoyable by all.I loved the themes, the pacing, the world, and the characters. It was phenomenal.The CharactersPeter, Susan, and Lucy: They were all so fun and I enjoyed following them and experiencing Narnia through them.Edmund: Freaking Edmund. He was such a good character. His arc was awesome and quite deep, actually. Definitely my favorite character.the White Witch: I was surprised at just how scary she actually was. Really, she was legitimately frightening!Aslan: I was worried that he would be preachy, but honestly he was sincerely powerful and strong and just pretty darn great.ConclusionI am so happy that I read this. It was really great. Such a funny, emotional, and powerful story. Freaking fantastic!

About This Item

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A stunning new edition of this timeless classic. This is the best loved of all the Chronicles of Narnia - the first one ever written, and the one everybody remembers reading as a child. Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

Specifications

Abridged
Y
Series Title
Best-Loved Classics
Publisher
HarperCollins Publishers
Book Format
Hardcover
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
48
Author
C S Lewis
ISBN-13
9780007442485
Publication Date
October, 2011
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
11.65 x 9.49 x 0.47 Inches
ISBN-10
0007442483

Customer Reviews

5 stars
127
4 stars
85
3 stars
21
2 stars
4
1 star
4
Most helpful positive review
1 customers found this helpful
I really liked this.Th...
I really liked this.The Writing and WorldbuildingI absolutely loved the writing style! It was very similar to J.M. Barrie, with fun asides and little comments throughout. Though definitely targeted at children, it is readable and enjoyable by all.I loved the themes, the pacing, the world, and the characters. It was phenomenal.The CharactersPeter, Susan, and Lucy: They were all so fun and I enjoyed following them and experiencing Narnia through them.Edmund: Freaking Edmund. He was such a good character. His arc was awesome and quite deep, actually. Definitely my favorite character.the White Witch: I was surprised at just how scary she actually was. Really, she was legitimately frightening!Aslan: I was worried that he would be preachy, but honestly he was sincerely powerful and strong and just pretty darn great.ConclusionI am so happy that I read this. It was really great. Such a funny, emotional, and powerful story. Freaking fantastic!
Most helpful negative review
2 customers found this helpful
Okay. My first time re...
Okay. My first time reading this as an adult. I picked it up because I read a short story by Neil Gaiman "The Problem of Susan" that referenced The Last Battle which of course is the last book in this series. As a kid I could never finish Prince Caspian so I never read any further. Well I've finished Prince Caspian but first I want to express my views on how very distressing I find this book.First, what we already knew. The extremely heavy Christian undertones. Get 'em while they're young. Yes, yes I DO know C.S. Lewis was also a Christian apologist, but is it fair to sneak it into the kid's food without them knowing? I, for one, obviously do not think so. I mean the death (and resurrection) of Aslan at the stone table? All we're missing is a cross and three days. It definitely warms kids up to the religion if you can point to a much beloved fairy tale character and bring parallels, don't you think? Or am I raving like Richard Dawkins? ANYWAY. What I find MORE disturbing, partially because it seems to fit in so well with the Christian undertones are the OVERTONES of misogyny. The most powerful evil character is both a woman and a fool. There is no redemption for her. Even looking at the sisters, Lucy and Susan, they are far weaker than the brothers and irritating to boot. I know this was published in the 1950's... but seriously?
Most helpful positive review
1 customers found this helpful
I really liked this.Th...
I really liked this.The Writing and WorldbuildingI absolutely loved the writing style! It was very similar to J.M. Barrie, with fun asides and little comments throughout. Though definitely targeted at children, it is readable and enjoyable by all.I loved the themes, the pacing, the world, and the characters. It was phenomenal.The CharactersPeter, Susan, and Lucy: They were all so fun and I enjoyed following them and experiencing Narnia through them.Edmund: Freaking Edmund. He was such a good character. His arc was awesome and quite deep, actually. Definitely my favorite character.the White Witch: I was surprised at just how scary she actually was. Really, she was legitimately frightening!Aslan: I was worried that he would be preachy, but honestly he was sincerely powerful and strong and just pretty darn great.ConclusionI am so happy that I read this. It was really great. Such a funny, emotional, and powerful story. Freaking fantastic!
Most helpful negative review
2 customers found this helpful
Okay. My first time re...
Okay. My first time reading this as an adult. I picked it up because I read a short story by Neil Gaiman "The Problem of Susan" that referenced The Last Battle which of course is the last book in this series. As a kid I could never finish Prince Caspian so I never read any further. Well I've finished Prince Caspian but first I want to express my views on how very distressing I find this book.First, what we already knew. The extremely heavy Christian undertones. Get 'em while they're young. Yes, yes I DO know C.S. Lewis was also a Christian apologist, but is it fair to sneak it into the kid's food without them knowing? I, for one, obviously do not think so. I mean the death (and resurrection) of Aslan at the stone table? All we're missing is a cross and three days. It definitely warms kids up to the religion if you can point to a much beloved fairy tale character and bring parallels, don't you think? Or am I raving like Richard Dawkins? ANYWAY. What I find MORE disturbing, partially because it seems to fit in so well with the Christian undertones are the OVERTONES of misogyny. The most powerful evil character is both a woman and a fool. There is no redemption for her. Even looking at the sisters, Lucy and Susan, they are far weaker than the brothers and irritating to boot. I know this was published in the 1950's... but seriously?
1-5 of 241 reviews

What is there left to ...

What is there left to say about The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe? It is a book so long- and well-loved by the public that there is no point attempting any kind of plot summary or general introduction to Lewis' world. Moreover, because it is a personal favorite I cannot bring myself to criticize it, and because it has been part of my life for longer than I can remember, I cannot approach it with any sense of novelty. I cannot even recall whether I was read this or saw the BBC miniseries first, but in any case it was the book that stuck with me, and became the first piece of literature I truly loved. (And yes, I'm quite aware that I'm describing Lewis' creation in near-romantic terms!) Other childhood favorites have been dethroned, other obsessions have faded away, but I have always remained a loyal Narnian. In light of the recent films' attempts to turn both this and Prince Caspian into Tolkienesque epics, as well as the completely misguided labeling of the books as "allegory" by fans and critics alike, I find myself returning to Lewis' own description of Narnia as a "fairy-story." As with the folktales of the Brothers Grimm or Hans Christian Anderson, I mainly think of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe in terms of images: a parcel-laden faun and a young girl walking underneath an umbrella in a winter landscape, an imperious white-skinned queen in her reindeer-drawn sledge, a noble Lion lying shorn and dead on a cold stone table. It has a simplicity, clarity, and charm rare in twentieth-century literature. But unlike many children's stories with imagery that lingers, nostalgically, in one's mind, I find that Lewis' work is just as impressive now as it was ten years ago, and that I notice new things about it every time I pick it up. The writing is excellent; as I read it aloud to my younger sister over the past few weeks, I found the words tripped off my tongue, despite the lengthy nature of certain sentences. Because he is here concerned with introducing a new world and a large cast of characters, there is not quite as much character development as in some of the other entries in the series, but the characters are always real and (where applicable) human, fairly leaping off the page in their vitality. In today's books one rarely discovers such unapologetically good or evil characters as Aslan or the Witch, and yet there has never been a moment when I did not believe in them. I highly recommend this as well as all of Lewis' Narnia books. Indeed, I would class them in that very small but important category of books everybody should read. If you have not yet, well, shame on you! Get working.

I really liked this.Th...

I really liked this.The Writing and WorldbuildingI absolutely loved the writing style! It was very similar to J.M. Barrie, with fun asides and little comments throughout. Though definitely targeted at children, it is readable and enjoyable by all.I loved the themes, the pacing, the world, and the characters. It was phenomenal.The CharactersPeter, Susan, and Lucy: They were all so fun and I enjoyed following them and experiencing Narnia through them.Edmund: Freaking Edmund. He was such a good character. His arc was awesome and quite deep, actually. Definitely my favorite character.the White Witch: I was surprised at just how scary she actually was. Really, she was legitimately frightening!Aslan: I was worried that he would be preachy, but honestly he was sincerely powerful and strong and just pretty darn great.ConclusionI am so happy that I read this. It was really great. Such a funny, emotional, and powerful story. Freaking fantastic!

What a joy to listen t...

What a joy to listen to Michael York's perfectly paced narration of the beginning of the Narnia-chronicles (ok, it might be nr. 2 in chronology, but I always start with this one - and it was the first one published...). York excels in setting the right mood and feelings as the story progresses. I've never listened to anything by him before, so it was a pleasant surprise. I wished he had done all of them - but I can only find this one by York. What can I say about the book itself? Just that it is a highly imaginative story - a classic enchanting fantasy adventure that is entertaining all the way through. On top of that - or should we way underneath? - it has of course the Christian allegories that Lewis put into the story which is specially conspicuous in this book where Aslan dies and is resurrected. My favorite moments are aways when the children interact and talk with Aslan. The mixture of awe and fear and trust and delight in his presence is just perfectly balanced.

This is a book I had n...

This is a book I had not read in too long. It wasn't until a classmate mentioned it that I was interested in reading it again. I always knew that C.S. Lewis was a religious author just by seeing his books at the Christian bookstore from time to time but I think over time I just forgot that. I feel like this is a book that has the ability to change as the reader changes. As a child I never knew the Lion was exemplifying God and now as an adult going back and reading this, it sheds a new light on an old story. A true classic about the importance of doing what is right, and how by doing so the good in that will always overpower wrong. It is an easy book to read and I think it holds a very deep and meaningful message. I am really happy I was reintroduced to this book.

The one that started i...

The one that started it all. Sure, it's Lewis so it has heavy Christian overtones...but as a kid, they flew right over my head and as an adult, although I know they're there...it doesn't make a difference one way or the other. It's a good fantastical tale and a story that challenges kids but also is manageable for younger ones. My 8-year-old enjoyed it, my 6-year-old enjoyed it more. They're looking forward to the next Narnia installment and I still have them all after 30+ years.

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