Generated at Wed, 11 Dec 2019 16:42:25 GMT exp-ck: undefined; xpa: ;
Electrode, Comp-845277384, DC-prod-dfw03, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-19.1.31, SHA-771c9ce79737366b1d5f53d21cad4086bf722e21, CID-2261665a-8ff-16ef5d71b1820e, Generated: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 16:42:25 GMT

The Jungle Books (Whole Story)

$28.03$28.03
Out of stock
Delivery not available
Pickup not available

Sold & shipped byDiscover Books
In central India, Mowgli leads an exciting life among the jungle animals.

Customer Review Snapshot

4.1 out of 5 stars
18 total reviews
5 stars
9
4 stars
3
3 stars
4
2 stars
2
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
I didn't expect to love this book as much as I did. Well, as much as I loved a good half of it. This isn't a novel, but a collection of 15 stories. Eight of them do involve Mowgli, a young Indian boy orphaned by the evil tiger Shere Khan, raised by wolves and who can count as friends and protectors Bagheera the black panther, Baloo the bear and Kaa the rock python. I've actually never seen the famous Disney film made from those stories, but that might have helped make the reading experience all the more fresh and delightful. What particularly struck me was the close observation of nature and animals evident right from the first sentence. If I were rating the Mowgli stories alone, I'd rank this book a five. But there are seven other stories, and these I felt more mixed about. I did love "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" about a brave mongoose versus cobras every bit as much as the Mowgli stories. I really liked two stories of the arctic, "The White Seal" about an Alaskan seal trying to find a sanctuary from men seeking to kill seals for fur and "Quiquern" about Canadian Inuits and their dogs searching for food. I liked "The Miracle of Purun Bhagat" and thought "Toomai of the Elephants" Okay. But I didn't like "The Undertakers" at all and hated "Her Majesty's Servants." One of the reasons I didn't expect to like Kipling much at all is his reputation as an imperialist and racist. He's notoriously the author of the poem "The White Man's Burden." (And just because you're the first doesn't mean you're the second. Arthur Conan Doyle struck me as uncritical of imperialism but it was clear from his stories he was no racist--even believed in racial intermarriage. Kipling's views are quite different judging from the introduction to the edition I read.) Despite Kipling's politics though I found reading this book there were good reasons why Indian authors such as Arundhati Roy, V.S. Naipaul and Salman Rushdie find Kipling impressive and even influential. Kipling can be a wonderful storyteller. Rushdie has said Kipling's writing has "the power simultaneously to infuriate and to entrance." Mostly I was entranced. But a few times, and especially in "Her Majesty's Servants," I thought the dark side of Kipling, and his unapologetic imperialism and certainty everyone had their place and should obediently stay in it, was at its worst.

About This Item

We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it.
In central India, Mowgli leads an exciting life among the jungle animals. Children will delight in this unabridged version of Rudyard Kiplings classics, Jungle Books One and Two! Not only does this attractive volume feature the beloved tales of Mowgli, the man cub raised by wolves, and Rikki Tikki Tavi, but also the lesser-known but wonderful stories of Toomai, the boy who gets to see elephants dance; Quiquern, who saves his Eskimo people from starvation; and Kotick, the white seal.

Specifications

Series Title
Whole Story
Publisher
Viking Children's Books
Book Format
Paperback
Number of Pages
216
Author
Rudyard Kipling
ISBN-13
9780670867974
Publication Date
May, 1996
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
9.29 x 7.00 x 0.51 Inches
ISBN-10
0670867977

Customer Reviews

5 stars
9
4 stars
3
3 stars
4
2 stars
2
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
1 customers found this helpful
I didnt expect to lov...
I didn't expect to love this book as much as I did. Well, as much as I loved a good half of it. This isn't a novel, but a collection of 15 stories. Eight of them do involve Mowgli, a young Indian boy orphaned by the evil tiger Shere Khan, raised by wolves and who can count as friends and protectors Bagheera the black panther, Baloo the bear and Kaa the rock python. I've actually never seen the famous Disney film made from those stories, but that might have helped make the reading experience all the more fresh and delightful. What particularly struck me was the close observation of nature and animals evident right from the first sentence. If I were rating the Mowgli stories alone, I'd rank this book a five. But there are seven other stories, and these I felt more mixed about. I did love "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" about a brave mongoose versus cobras every bit as much as the Mowgli stories. I really liked two stories of the arctic, "The White Seal" about an Alaskan seal trying to find a sanctuary from men seeking to kill seals for fur and "Quiquern" about Canadian Inuits and their dogs searching for food. I liked "The Miracle of Purun Bhagat" and thought "Toomai of the Elephants" Okay. But I didn't like "The Undertakers" at all and hated "Her Majesty's Servants." One of the reasons I didn't expect to like Kipling much at all is his reputation as an imperialist and racist. He's notoriously the author of the poem "The White Man's Burden." (And just because you're the first doesn't mean you're the second. Arthur Conan Doyle struck me as uncritical of imperialism but it was clear from his stories he was no racist--even believed in racial intermarriage. Kipling's views are quite different judging from the introduction to the edition I read.) Despite Kipling's politics though I found reading this book there were good reasons why Indian authors such as Arundhati Roy, V.S. Naipaul and Salman Rushdie find Kipling impressive and even influential. Kipling can be a wonderful storyteller. Rushdie has said Kipling's writing has "the power simultaneously to infuriate and to entrance." Mostly I was entranced. But a few times, and especially in "Her Majesty's Servants," I thought the dark side of Kipling, and his unapologetic imperialism and certainty everyone had their place and should obediently stay in it, was at its worst.
Most helpful negative review
I was super excited to...
I was super excited to read this book before seeing the new movie. I didn't realize this, but the Jungle Books are a bunch of short stories, some of which, are about Mowgli and the characters we know from Disney's The Jungle Book. The stories about Mowgli and the Jungle are OK. A little dry and boring at times. The other stories, however, are EXTREMELY boring and VERY dry. There were only a couple stories I liked that didn't have Mowgli in them; the mongoose story, the seal story and the elephant story. Other than that, the other stories were kind of painful to get through... I wonder if I am the only one that felt that way..... :-/
Most helpful positive review
1 customers found this helpful
I didnt expect to lov...
I didn't expect to love this book as much as I did. Well, as much as I loved a good half of it. This isn't a novel, but a collection of 15 stories. Eight of them do involve Mowgli, a young Indian boy orphaned by the evil tiger Shere Khan, raised by wolves and who can count as friends and protectors Bagheera the black panther, Baloo the bear and Kaa the rock python. I've actually never seen the famous Disney film made from those stories, but that might have helped make the reading experience all the more fresh and delightful. What particularly struck me was the close observation of nature and animals evident right from the first sentence. If I were rating the Mowgli stories alone, I'd rank this book a five. But there are seven other stories, and these I felt more mixed about. I did love "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" about a brave mongoose versus cobras every bit as much as the Mowgli stories. I really liked two stories of the arctic, "The White Seal" about an Alaskan seal trying to find a sanctuary from men seeking to kill seals for fur and "Quiquern" about Canadian Inuits and their dogs searching for food. I liked "The Miracle of Purun Bhagat" and thought "Toomai of the Elephants" Okay. But I didn't like "The Undertakers" at all and hated "Her Majesty's Servants." One of the reasons I didn't expect to like Kipling much at all is his reputation as an imperialist and racist. He's notoriously the author of the poem "The White Man's Burden." (And just because you're the first doesn't mean you're the second. Arthur Conan Doyle struck me as uncritical of imperialism but it was clear from his stories he was no racist--even believed in racial intermarriage. Kipling's views are quite different judging from the introduction to the edition I read.) Despite Kipling's politics though I found reading this book there were good reasons why Indian authors such as Arundhati Roy, V.S. Naipaul and Salman Rushdie find Kipling impressive and even influential. Kipling can be a wonderful storyteller. Rushdie has said Kipling's writing has "the power simultaneously to infuriate and to entrance." Mostly I was entranced. But a few times, and especially in "Her Majesty's Servants," I thought the dark side of Kipling, and his unapologetic imperialism and certainty everyone had their place and should obediently stay in it, was at its worst.
Most helpful negative review
I was super excited to...
I was super excited to read this book before seeing the new movie. I didn't realize this, but the Jungle Books are a bunch of short stories, some of which, are about Mowgli and the characters we know from Disney's The Jungle Book. The stories about Mowgli and the Jungle are OK. A little dry and boring at times. The other stories, however, are EXTREMELY boring and VERY dry. There were only a couple stories I liked that didn't have Mowgli in them; the mongoose story, the seal story and the elephant story. Other than that, the other stories were kind of painful to get through... I wonder if I am the only one that felt that way..... :-/
1-5 of 18 reviews

eBookOnce again, Im s...

eBookOnce again, I'm struck by the savagery that resonates throughout Kipling's writing. It would be so easy to think of The Jungle Book in a more Disney-fied light: talking animals, singing, the rhythmic cadences of a fairy tale or lullaby. But overarching all that is the ever-present reminder that the world of the jungle is a world of nature, red in tooth and claw. Mowgli is raised by wolves and instructed by Baloo for the explicit purpose of survival in a harsh world that actively seeks his death. Kotick is born and raised amidst bloodshed from two distinct sources: other seals and man. "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" subverts the traditional story of a pet protecting his master by making the masters little more than incidental characters; Rikki-Tikki wants to protect them, but his actions are driven by instinct rather than any familial bond with the humans. Even in the less-obviously blood-drenched stories, violence is a powerful force. Toomai's journey to witness the dance of the elephants puts him at great risk of death.The story I found most interesting, however, was the one which closes the book, "Her Majesty's Servants." The characters of this particular story are the camp animals for an army, but paradoxically, these might be the most innocent characters in the whole book. All their conversation is about war and its methods, but without any real recognition of what it means. These animals have been tamed by man, stripped of their natural instincts, and so, with the exception of the elephant, they don't realize what war means, content merely to follow orders and limit their perspective to the specifics of their duties.And maybe that's the true lesson of The Jungle Book. Yes, it's violent, endlessly circling and returning to the themes of death and danger, but in the world of the animals, death and danger exists because they are necessary parts of life. Animals must eat, so animals must hunt and kill. But for people, violence is stripped of that which makes it necessary. Wars don't happen for food and survival; they happen for sport and profit.Or maybe I'm just a filthy hippie.

If youve only experie...

If you've only experienced Disney's version of the Mowgli stories, the books will show you a whole new world. The jungle is a dark and often violent place. Kipling's adventure tales are also commentaries on what he saw in the world of his time, and adults will find them as enthralling as their children. Many editions of these tales are heavily abridged...always to their detriment, in my opinion. My parents gave me this edition when I was 11 and it's remained my favorite. Whichever version you read, make sure it's a complete one as the stories of Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, Toomai and the others are just as good a read as the more famous Mowgli adventures.

The edition that I rea...

The edition that I read contains both the first and the second Jungle Books. I had never read this as a child, and was only familiar with the Disney version. Therefore, this book was full of surprises! Some of my favorite stories, like Rikki Tikki Tavi and many others didn't even make it into the film at all. There were even stories about the Arctic! As far as the Mowgli stories, which were wonderful, Kaa was far wiser and was not an antagonist. I'm so glad that I finally read this. I enjoyed it.

I didnt expect to lov...

I didn't expect to love this book as much as I did. Well, as much as I loved a good half of it. This isn't a novel, but a collection of 15 stories. Eight of them do involve Mowgli, a young Indian boy orphaned by the evil tiger Shere Khan, raised by wolves and who can count as friends and protectors Bagheera the black panther, Baloo the bear and Kaa the rock python. I've actually never seen the famous Disney film made from those stories, but that might have helped make the reading experience all the more fresh and delightful. What particularly struck me was the close observation of nature and animals evident right from the first sentence. If I were rating the Mowgli stories alone, I'd rank this book a five. But there are seven other stories, and these I felt more mixed about. I did love "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" about a brave mongoose versus cobras every bit as much as the Mowgli stories. I really liked two stories of the arctic, "The White Seal" about an Alaskan seal trying to find a sanctuary from men seeking to kill seals for fur and "Quiquern" about Canadian Inuits and their dogs searching for food. I liked "The Miracle of Purun Bhagat" and thought "Toomai of the Elephants" Okay. But I didn't like "The Undertakers" at all and hated "Her Majesty's Servants." One of the reasons I didn't expect to like Kipling much at all is his reputation as an imperialist and racist. He's notoriously the author of the poem "The White Man's Burden." (And just because you're the first doesn't mean you're the second. Arthur Conan Doyle struck me as uncritical of imperialism but it was clear from his stories he was no racist--even believed in racial intermarriage. Kipling's views are quite different judging from the introduction to the edition I read.) Despite Kipling's politics though I found reading this book there were good reasons why Indian authors such as Arundhati Roy, V.S. Naipaul and Salman Rushdie find Kipling impressive and even influential. Kipling can be a wonderful storyteller. Rushdie has said Kipling's writing has "the power simultaneously to infuriate and to entrance." Mostly I was entranced. But a few times, and especially in "Her Majesty's Servants," I thought the dark side of Kipling, and his unapologetic imperialism and certainty everyone had their place and should obediently stay in it, was at its worst.

The Jungle Books are a...

The Jungle Books are a bit different than I was expecting. The biggest thing I didn't know was that they are anthologies, not a novel. 2nd not all the stories are about Mowgli and crew. Most of the stories took place somewhere in India but there was one it each book that was very different. The first book had a story about seals and the second about Eskimos. It was a little weird. One of the biggest surprises was that several of the stories were much more gory than I had expected from the 'hype', not bad but a few of them I would be have to consider before reading to a 7 year old. Overall I enjoyed this book, it's worthwhile reading.

Customer Q&A

Get specific details about this product from customers who own it.

Policies & Plans

Pricing policy

About our prices
We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything. So if you find a current lower price from an online retailer on an identical, in-stock product, tell us and we'll match it. See more details atOnline Price Match.
webapp branch
Electrode, Comp-283873754, DC-prod-dfw6, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-30.0.3-ebf-2, SHA-8c8e8dc1c07e462c80c1b82096c2da2858100078, CID-d61e009b-56a-16ef5e218e6d9b, Generated: Wed, 11 Dec 2019 16:54:25 GMT