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The Inner Circle

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There are stories no one knows. Hidden stories. I love those stories. And since I work in the National Archives, I find those stories for a living. <p></p> Beecher White, a young archivist, spends his days working with the most important documents of the U.S. government. He has always been the keeper of other people's stories, never a part of the story himself... <p></p> Until now. <p></p> When Clementine Kaye, Beecher's first childhood crush, shows up at the National Archives asking for his help tracking down her long-lost father, Beecher tries to impress her by showing her the secret vault where the President of the United States privately reviews classified documents. After they accidentally happen upon a priceless artifact - a 200 hundred-year-old dictionary that once belonged to George Washington, hidden underneath a desk chair, Beecher and Clementine find themselves suddenly entangled in a web of deception, conspiracy, and murder. <p></p> Soon a man is dead, and Beecher is on the run as he races to learn the truth behind this mysterious national treasure. His search will lead him to discover a coded and ingenious puzzle that conceals a disturbing secret from the founding of our nation. It is a secret, Beecher soon discovers, that some believe is worth killing for. <p></p> Gripping, fast-paced, and filled with the fascinating historical detail for which he is famous, <i>The Inner Circle</i> is a thrilling novel that once again proves Brad Meltzer as a brilliant author writing at the height of his craft.

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There are stories no one knows. Hidden stories. I love those stories. And since I work in the National Archives, I find those stories for a living.

Beecher White, a young archivist, spends his days working with the most important documents of the U.S. government. He has always been the keeper of other people's stories, never a part of the story himself...

Until now.

When Clementine Kaye, Beecher's first childhood crush, shows up at the National Archives asking for his help tracking down her long-lost father, Beecher tries to impress her by showing her the secret vault where the President of the United States privately reviews classified documents. After they accidentally happen upon a priceless artifact - a 200 hundred-year-old dictionary that once belonged to George Washington, hidden underneath a desk chair, Beecher and Clementine find themselves suddenly entangled in a web of deception, conspiracy, and murder.

Soon a man is dead, and Beecher is on the run as he races to learn the truth behind this mysterious national treasure. His search will lead him to discover a coded and ingenious puzzle that conceals a disturbing secret from the founding of our nation. It is a secret, Beecher soon discovers, that some believe is worth killing for.

Gripping, fast-paced, and filled with the fascinating historical detail for which he is famous, The Inner Circle is a thrilling novel that once again proves Brad Meltzer as a brilliant author writing at the height of his craft.There are stories no one knows. Hidden stories. I love those stories. And since I work in the National Archives, I find those stories for a living.

Beecher White, a young archivist, spends his days working with the most important documents of the U.S. government. He has always been the keeper of other people's stories, never a part of the story himself...

Until now.

When Clementine Kaye, Beecher's first childhood crush, shows up at the National Archives asking for his help tracking down her long-lost father, Beecher tries to impress her by showing her the secret vault where the President of the United States privately reviews classified documents. After they accidentally happen upon a priceless artifact - a 200 hundred-year-old dictionary that once belonged to George Washington, hidden underneath a desk chair, Beecher and Clementine find themselves suddenly entangled in a web of deception, conspiracy, and murder.

Soon a man is dead, and Beecher is on the run as he races to learn the truth behind this mysterious national treasure. His search will lead him to discover a coded and ingenious puzzle that conceals a disturbing secret from the founding of our nation. It is a secret, Beecher soon discovers, that some believe is worth killing for.

Gripping, fast-paced, and filled with the fascinating historical detail for which he is famous, The Inner Circle is a thrilling novel that once again proves Brad Meltzer as a brilliant author writing at the height of his craft.

Specifications

Series Title
The Culper Ring Series
Publisher
Grand Central Publishing
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
640
Author
Brad Meltzer
ISBN-13
9781455561391
Publication Date
April, 2015
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
6.75 x 4.25 x 1.50 Inches
ISBN-10
1455561398

Customer Reviews

Average rating:3.3out of5stars
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Most helpful positive review
Average rating:5out of5stars
Beecher White loves hi...
Beecher White loves his job as a researcher at the National Archives in Washington, D. C. "As they told me when I first started as an archivist three years ago," says Beecher, "the Archives is our nation's attic. A ten-billion-document scrapbook with nearly every vital file, record, and report that the government produces. No question, that means this is a building full of secrets. Some big, some small. But every day, I get to unearth another one." In Brad Meltzer's new political thriller, "The Inner Circle," a 26 year-old secret threatens to derail a presidency wrought with lies and deceptions and pits the survival of the president against the preservation of his office. When Beecher's old flame, Clementine Kaye, asks him to help her search for the identity of her deceased father, Beecher tries to impress her by sneaking into a SCIF-Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility-used by the President of the United States, Orson Wallace, for viewing top secret documents. Clementine inadvertently knocks over the President's chair and discovers a tattered and mostly gutted old "Entick's New Spelling Dictionary" hidden in its bottom. On close inspection Beecher finds an inscription on the book's inside front cover: Existus Acta Probat. The outcome justifies the deed. Beecher instantly recognizes the motto as an aphorism used by George Washington on his bookplates and concludes that the original owner of the book was, in all probability, our first president. Because the book was concealed, Beecher also presumes that it is serving a clandestine purpose. Beecher's security guard friend, Orlando, instantly grasps the implication of the discovery and yanks the security system's videotape so that no one will discover that they were there. Beecher stashes the dictionary under his blue lab coat and pulls Clementine from the room. Soon after, Orlando is found dead under suspicious circumstances. Beecher shares the old dictionary with his mentor and fellow archivist Aristotle "Tot" Westman and they discover that the relic was used by Washington in 1775 to communicate with his Culper Ring, a small band of loyalists who spied on the British during the Revolutionary War. "The Culper Ring weren't soldiers. They were normal people-a group no one could possibly know-even Washington didn't know their names. That way they could never be infiltrated-no one, not even the commander-in-chief, knew who was in it." When Tot checks the archive's records he finds that that the old dictionary has been checked out by someone named Dustin Gyrich 14 times in 14 weeks, each time coinciding with a Presidential visit to the SCIF. Further research shows that Gyrich has been checking out books in the National Archives for over a hundred and fifty years. In "The Inner Circle" the Culper Ring didn't disband after the Colonies beat the British. This secret organization is still going strong and Beecher's discovery of the 200 year-old dictionary triggers a chain of events that brings to light the permanency of the spy ring and tests the very cannons upon which our country was founded. Beecher could not foresee that he and Clementine had stumbled upon a presidential secret so important it could place their lives in jeopardy. From the first page "The Inner Circle" is a high energy adventure that draws upon interesting and little-known historical facts, taking the possibilities of the future and the certainties of the present and intertwining them with the secrets of the past. As with all of this author's thrillers, the plot and sub-plots twist and turn as the story unfolds, making it impossible for the reader to guess the outcome. Meltzer resurrects his evil character Nico from "The Book of Fate" as Clementine's father and cleverly uses him as an omniscient narrator to decipher and reveal the old dictionary's hidden missives. As a thriller, "The Inner Circle" is an absorbing read. The author's view of history adds a fascinating dimension to the story. One of Beecher's co-workers illustrates Meltzer's take on the history-making process. ". . . history isn't just something that's written. It's a selection process. It chooses moments, and events, and yes, people-and it hands them a situation they should never be able to overcome. It happens to millions of us every single day. But the only ones we read about are the ones who face that situation, and fight that situation, and find out who they really are." "The Inner Circle" is a very well crafted story with authentic characters and a clever plot. This is a thriller that probes the dark side of political omnipotence and leaves the reader with an uneasy feeling that perhaps it is all too real.
Most helpful negative review
Average rating:2out of5stars
This was a miss with a...
This was a miss with a convoluted plot held together by a mostly useless secret society. Too many scenes stretched plausibility. I wanted to abandon it several times, but persevered in hopes that Mr. Meltzer would come through with a winner in the end. Not so. I can only hope that there's no sequel, but I see this book described as "Beecher White #1". Perhaps he'll develop into a more interesting character.
Most helpful positive review
Average rating:5out of5stars
Beecher White loves hi...
Beecher White loves his job as a researcher at the National Archives in Washington, D. C. "As they told me when I first started as an archivist three years ago," says Beecher, "the Archives is our nation's attic. A ten-billion-document scrapbook with nearly every vital file, record, and report that the government produces. No question, that means this is a building full of secrets. Some big, some small. But every day, I get to unearth another one." In Brad Meltzer's new political thriller, "The Inner Circle," a 26 year-old secret threatens to derail a presidency wrought with lies and deceptions and pits the survival of the president against the preservation of his office. When Beecher's old flame, Clementine Kaye, asks him to help her search for the identity of her deceased father, Beecher tries to impress her by sneaking into a SCIF-Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility-used by the President of the United States, Orson Wallace, for viewing top secret documents. Clementine inadvertently knocks over the President's chair and discovers a tattered and mostly gutted old "Entick's New Spelling Dictionary" hidden in its bottom. On close inspection Beecher finds an inscription on the book's inside front cover: Existus Acta Probat. The outcome justifies the deed. Beecher instantly recognizes the motto as an aphorism used by George Washington on his bookplates and concludes that the original owner of the book was, in all probability, our first president. Because the book was concealed, Beecher also presumes that it is serving a clandestine purpose. Beecher's security guard friend, Orlando, instantly grasps the implication of the discovery and yanks the security system's videotape so that no one will discover that they were there. Beecher stashes the dictionary under his blue lab coat and pulls Clementine from the room. Soon after, Orlando is found dead under suspicious circumstances. Beecher shares the old dictionary with his mentor and fellow archivist Aristotle "Tot" Westman and they discover that the relic was used by Washington in 1775 to communicate with his Culper Ring, a small band of loyalists who spied on the British during the Revolutionary War. "The Culper Ring weren't soldiers. They were normal people-a group no one could possibly know-even Washington didn't know their names. That way they could never be infiltrated-no one, not even the commander-in-chief, knew who was in it." When Tot checks the archive's records he finds that that the old dictionary has been checked out by someone named Dustin Gyrich 14 times in 14 weeks, each time coinciding with a Presidential visit to the SCIF. Further research shows that Gyrich has been checking out books in the National Archives for over a hundred and fifty years. In "The Inner Circle" the Culper Ring didn't disband after the Colonies beat the British. This secret organization is still going strong and Beecher's discovery of the 200 year-old dictionary triggers a chain of events that brings to light the permanency of the spy ring and tests the very cannons upon which our country was founded. Beecher could not foresee that he and Clementine had stumbled upon a presidential secret so important it could place their lives in jeopardy. From the first page "The Inner Circle" is a high energy adventure that draws upon interesting and little-known historical facts, taking the possibilities of the future and the certainties of the present and intertwining them with the secrets of the past. As with all of this author's thrillers, the plot and sub-plots twist and turn as the story unfolds, making it impossible for the reader to guess the outcome. Meltzer resurrects his evil character Nico from "The Book of Fate" as Clementine's father and cleverly uses him as an omniscient narrator to decipher and reveal the old dictionary's hidden missives. As a thriller, "The Inner Circle" is an absorbing read. The author's view of history adds a fascinating dimension to the story. One of Beecher's co-workers illustrates Meltzer's take on the history-making process. ". . . history isn't just something that's written. It's a selection process. It chooses moments, and events, and yes, people-and it hands them a situation they should never be able to overcome. It happens to millions of us every single day. But the only ones we read about are the ones who face that situation, and fight that situation, and find out who they really are." "The Inner Circle" is a very well crafted story with authentic characters and a clever plot. This is a thriller that probes the dark side of political omnipotence and leaves the reader with an uneasy feeling that perhaps it is all too real.
Most helpful negative review
Average rating:2out of5stars
This was a miss with a...
This was a miss with a convoluted plot held together by a mostly useless secret society. Too many scenes stretched plausibility. I wanted to abandon it several times, but persevered in hopes that Mr. Meltzer would come through with a winner in the end. Not so. I can only hope that there's no sequel, but I see this book described as "Beecher White #1". Perhaps he'll develop into a more interesting character.
Beecher White loves his job as a researcher at the National Archives in Washington, D. C. "As they told me when I first started as an archivist three years ago," says Beecher, "the Archives is our nation's attic. A ten-billion-document scrapbook with nearly every vital file, record, and report that the government produces. No question, that means this is a building full of secrets. Some big, some small. But every day, I get to unearth another one." In Brad Meltzer's new political thriller, "The Inner Circle," a 26 year-old secret threatens to derail a presidency wrought with lies and deceptions and pits the survival of the president against the preservation of his office. When Beecher's old flame, Clementine Kaye, asks him to help her search for the identity of her deceased father, Beecher tries to impress her by sneaking into a SCIF-Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility-used by the President of the United States, Orson Wallace, for viewing top secret documents. Clementine inadvertently knocks over the President's chair and discovers a tattered and mostly gutted old "Entick's New Spelling Dictionary" hidden in its bottom. On close inspection Beecher finds an inscription on the book's inside front cover: Existus Acta Probat. The outcome justifies the deed. Beecher instantly recognizes the motto as an aphorism used by George Washington on his bookplates and concludes that the original owner of the book was, in all probability, our first president. Because the book was concealed, Beecher also presumes that it is serving a clandestine purpose. Beecher's security guard friend, Orlando, instantly grasps the implication of the discovery and yanks the security system's videotape so that no one will discover that they were there. Beecher stashes the dictionary under his blue lab coat and pulls Clementine from the room. Soon after, Orlando is found dead under suspicious circumstances. Beecher shares the old dictionary with his mentor and fellow archivist Aristotle "Tot" Westman and they discover that the relic was used by Washington in 1775 to communicate with his Culper Ring, a small band of loyalists who spied on the British during the Revolutionary War. "The Culper Ring weren't soldiers. They were normal people-a group no one could possibly know-even Washington didn't know their names. That way they could never be infiltrated-no one, not even the commander-in-chief, knew who was in it." When Tot checks the archive's records he finds that that the old dictionary has been checked out by someone named Dustin Gyrich 14 times in 14 weeks, each time coinciding with a Presidential visit to the SCIF. Further research shows that Gyrich has been checking out books in the National Archives for over a hundred and fifty years. In "The Inner Circle" the Culper Ring didn't disband after the Colonies beat the British. This secret organization is still going strong and Beecher's discovery of the 200 year-old dictionary triggers a chain of events that brings to light the permanency of the spy ring and tests the very cannons upon which our country was founded. Beecher could not foresee that he and Clementine had stumbled upon a presidential secret so important it could place their lives in jeopardy. From the first page "The Inner Circle" is a high energy adventure that draws upon interesting and little-known historical facts, taking the possibilities of the future and the certainties of the present and intertwining them with the secrets of the past. As with all of this author's thrillers, the plot and sub-plots twist and turn as the story unfolds, making it impossible for the reader to guess the outcome. Meltzer resurrects his evil character Nico from "The Book of Fate" as Clementine's father and cleverly uses him as an omniscient narrator to decipher and reveal the old dictionary's hidden missives. As a thriller, "The Inner Circle" is an absorbing read. The author's view of history adds a fascinating dimension to the story. One of Beecher's co-workers illustrates Meltzer's take on the history-making process. ". . . history isn't just something that's written. It's a selection process. It chooses moments, and events, and yes, people-and it hands them a situation they should never be able to overcome. It happens to millions of us every single day. But the only ones we read about are the ones who face that situation, and fight that situation, and find out who they really are." "The Inner Circle" is a very well crafted story with authentic characters and a clever plot. This is a thriller that probes the dark side of political omnipotence and leaves the reader with an uneasy feeling that perhaps it is all too real.
This was a miss with a convoluted plot held together by a mostly useless secret society. Too many scenes stretched plausibility. I wanted to abandon it several times, but persevered in hopes that Mr. Meltzer would come through with a winner in the end. Not so. I can only hope that there's no sequel, but I see this book described as "Beecher White #1". Perhaps he'll develop into a more interesting character.

Frequent mentions

1-5 of 31 reviews
Average rating:5out of5stars

Beecher White loves hi...

Beecher White loves his job as a researcher at the National Archives in Washington, D. C. "As they told me when I first started as an archivist three years ago," says Beecher, "the Archives is our nation's attic. A ten-billion-document scrapbook with nearly every vital file, record, and report that the government produces. No question, that means this is a building full of secrets. Some big, some small. But every day, I get to unearth another one." In Brad Meltzer's new political thriller, "The Inner Circle," a 26 year-old secret threatens to derail a presidency wrought with lies and deceptions and pits the survival of the president against the preservation of his office. When Beecher's old flame, Clementine Kaye, asks him to help her search for the identity of her deceased father, Beecher tries to impress her by sneaking into a SCIF-Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility-used by the President of the United States, Orson Wallace, for viewing top secret documents. Clementine inadvertently knocks over the President's chair and discovers a tattered and mostly gutted old "Entick's New Spelling Dictionary" hidden in its bottom. On close inspection Beecher finds an inscription on the book's inside front cover: Existus Acta Probat. The outcome justifies the deed. Beecher instantly recognizes the motto as an aphorism used by George Washington on his bookplates and concludes that the original owner of the book was, in all probability, our first president. Because the book was concealed, Beecher also presumes that it is serving a clandestine purpose. Beecher's security guard friend, Orlando, instantly grasps the implication of the discovery and yanks the security system's videotape so that no one will discover that they were there. Beecher stashes the dictionary under his blue lab coat and pulls Clementine from the room. Soon after, Orlando is found dead under suspicious circumstances. Beecher shares the old dictionary with his mentor and fellow archivist Aristotle "Tot" Westman and they discover that the relic was used by Washington in 1775 to communicate with his Culper Ring, a small band of loyalists who spied on the British during the Revolutionary War. "The Culper Ring weren't soldiers. They were normal people-a group no one could possibly know-even Washington didn't know their names. That way they could never be infiltrated-no one, not even the commander-in-chief, knew who was in it." When Tot checks the archive's records he finds that that the old dictionary has been checked out by someone named Dustin Gyrich 14 times in 14 weeks, each time coinciding with a Presidential visit to the SCIF. Further research shows that Gyrich has been checking out books in the National Archives for over a hundred and fifty years. In "The Inner Circle" the Culper Ring didn't disband after the Colonies beat the British. This secret organization is still going strong and Beecher's discovery of the 200 year-old dictionary triggers a chain of events that brings to light the permanency of the spy ring and tests the very cannons upon which our country was founded. Beecher could not foresee that he and Clementine had stumbled upon a presidential secret so important it could place their lives in jeopardy. From the first page "The Inner Circle" is a high energy adventure that draws upon interesting and little-known historical facts, taking the possibilities of the future and the certainties of the present and intertwining them with the secrets of the past. As with all of this author's thrillers, the plot and sub-plots twist and turn as the story unfolds, making it impossible for the reader to guess the outcome. Meltzer resurrects his evil character Nico from "The Book of Fate" as Clementine's father and cleverly uses him as an omniscient narrator to decipher and reveal the old dictionary's hidden missives. As a thriller, "The Inner Circle" is an absorbing read. The author's view of history adds a fascinating dimension to the story. One of Beecher's co-workers illustrates Meltzer's take on the history-making process. ". . . history isn't just something that's written. It's a selection process. It chooses moments, and events, and yes, people-and it hands them a situation they should never be able to overcome. It happens to millions of us every single day. But the only ones we read about are the ones who face that situation, and fight that situation, and find out who they really are." "The Inner Circle" is a very well crafted story with authentic characters and a clever plot. This is a thriller that probes the dark side of political omnipotence and leaves the reader with an uneasy feeling that perhaps it is all too real.

Average rating:4out of5stars

An enjoyable thriller ...

An enjoyable thriller about a secret society -- or two -- that protects the presidency of the U.S. that dates back to George Washington. A few zigs and zags keep the reader guessing, but the story is a bit long and cumbersome at points... and the reasoning behind certain actions seems contrived. Overall, a good read.

Average rating:4out of5stars

Meltzers newest book ...

Meltzer's newest book is centred around the National Archives. I have to admit that this is an institution I've never given a lot of thought to. However, the archivists with which he's populated this book and the way he's made the institution come alive have now made me want to do research on the topic (although I hope there won't be as much cloak and dagger involved in the actual story). The main story revolves around an archivist named Beecher. A high school friend of his, Clementine, (who he hasn't heard from in years) contacts him and wants information on who her father is. Since he's former military and Beecher works in the Archives, she knows he can access the information. She happens to visit Beecher on the same day that the President makes one of his routine visits to the Archives. You know, Clinton liked to job, Obama played basketball, and President Orson Wallace likes to read old documents in the Archives. Clementine and Beecher run into a guard, Orlando, outside of the President's reading room just moments before he's schedule to arrive. They let her in, one thing leads to another, and they discover something they weren't meant to. Soon, Orlando is dead, and Beecher is learning about the Culper Ring. The Culper Ring was organised by George Washington to send and deliver messages during the American Revolution. But some say the Ring still exists to protect the Presidency - not the President, but the Presidency. And they may have Beecher in their sights. This book is intelligent, fast-paced, and should not be read by people who are tired or doped up on cold medicine. I zipped through the first 300 pages in two days and stopped only because the plot twists were becoming too much for my foggy brain. Beecher was immensely likeable, as was his mentor Tot (Aristotle).

Average rating:4out of5stars

An archivist in D.C. d...

An archivist in D.C. discovers an informal loose knit group involved in government. Brad Meltzer either has a great imagination or a working knowledge of the government. His attention to detail is admirable. I need to research the government's archives to see if his description is fact or fiction. Either way, it was a great setting for a good story.

Average rating:4out of5stars

I like this authors qu...

I like this authors quick, page turner novels. There is always enough mystery and suspence to keep me interested. The authors writing style I like better than some of the " dime" novels on the super marked shelf- this author never disappoints me for a quick, lively read.


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