The Great Lakes Lighthouse Brides Collection : 7 Historical Romances Are a Beacon of Hope to Weary Hearts

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<div> Travel to the Great Lakes, America’s inland seas, and experience seven historical romances that rescue lonely lightkeepers between 1883 and 1911. <br /> &nbsp; </div>

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Travel to the Great Lakes, America’s inland seas, and experience seven historical romances that rescue lonely lightkeepers between 1883 and 1911.
 
Lighthouses have long been the symbol of salvation, warning sailors away from dangerous rocks and shallow waters.
Along the Great Lakes, America’s inland seas, lighthouses played a vital role in the growth of the nation. They shepherded settlers traveling by water to places that had no roads. These beacons of light required constant tending even in remote and often dangerous places. Brave men and women battled the elements and loneliness to keep the lights shining. Their sacrifice kept goods and immigrants moving. Seven romances set between 1883 and 1911 bring hope to these lonely keepers and love to weary hearts.

Anna’s Tower by Pegg Thomas
1883—Thunder Bay Island Lighthouse
Anna Wilson's plan to be the next lighthouse keeper is endangered when Maksim Ivanov is shipwrecked on Thunder Bay Island. Handsome and capable, he could steal her dream. Or provide a new one.
 
Beneath a Michigan Moon by Candice Sue Patterson
1885—New Presque Isle Lighthouse
Ava Ryan’s father has passed, leaving her alone, and ill, to tend the light with nowhere else to go. Logging foreman Benjamin Colfax needs the height of the lighthouse to determine the best cutting route, but he senses something amiss in Ava and her determination to remain reclusive. Can he get her to open up, or will she keep herself locked away?
 
Safe Haven by Rebecca Jepson
1892—Old Mission Point Lighthouse
Rose Miller was found on the lighthouse doorstep as an infant, and now she must hide her quest to find the child who left her there from Captain Nathan Perry, the man she loves to hate.
 
Love’s Beacon by Carrie Fancett Pagels
1898—Round Island Lighthouse
Valerie Fillman's best hope for a future lies on the tiny island that holds her worst memories. Can Paul Sholtus, the new lightkeeper, and his daughter help bring healing? And love?
 
The Last Memory by Kathleen Rouser
1899—Mackinac Point Lighthouse 
Natalie Brooks loses her past to amnesia, and Cal Waterson, the lighthouse keeper who rescues her, didn’t bargain on risking his heart—when her past might change everything.
 
The Disappearing Ship by Lena Nelson Dooley
1902—Whitefish Point Lighthouse
Romance and mystery collide at Whitefish Point Lighthouse when unemployed doctor Norma Kimbell and Drake Logan, owner of a steamship line, search for evidence of a supposed shipwreck.
 
The Wrong Survivor by Marilyn Turk
1911—Au Sable Lighthouse
Lydia Palmer's dream for happiness as a lighthouse keeper's wife shatters when her fiancé Nathan Drake drowned in a shipwreck, but his brother Jesse survived. 

Specifications

Features
Trade Paper
Publisher
Barbour Publishing, Inc.
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
448
Author
Candice Sue Patterson, Pegg Thomas, Lena Nelson Dooley, Kathleen Rouser, Marilyn Turk, Carrie Fancett Pagels, Rebecca Jepson
ISBN-13
9781683227694
Publication Date
November, 2018
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
9.00 x 6.00 x 1.16 Inches
ISBN-10
1683227697

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Most Helpful Review
History
I have always been fascinated with lighthouses. A beacon of light high in a tower that warned sailors of danger and helped them safely guide their ships. I knew that there were people who maintained them but I had never really stopped to think about the type of person who took on this responsibility. Seven authors have joined to each write a novella about the lighthouses that were stationed along the Great Lakes between the years of 1883 to 1911. The Great Lighthouse Brides Collection offers readers the chance to imagine the lives of the men and women who served as lighthouse keepers. People who faced loneliness, hardship and danger as they kept the lighthouses going so that the journeys would be safe for the settlers who were forced to travel by ship. In each of these novellas female characters play an important part. There is an independent young woman who wants to earn a job as a lighthouse keeper, the young woman who needs to protect her secret to remain at the lighthouse, and another young woman seeking to find who left her as a baby on the lighthouse steps. One woman is helped by a male lighthouse keeper when she finds herself forced to return to the place that caused her so much misery and still another is rescued by a lighthouse keeper after losing her past memories to amnesia. Add the mystery of a shipwreck and a young woman grieving for her fiancee who died in a shipwreck and you have seven stories that will keep you engrossed. Historical fiction, yes, but there is also lots of romance and some of the stories simply take your breath away! I am very impressed with the ability of seven different authors to create stories that worked so well together. The Great Lakes Lighthouse Brides Collection is a great choice for anyone who only has short amounts of time to read and I recommend it to anyone who enjoys historical fiction and Christian romance. I received a complimentary copy of this book but a positive review was not required.
1-5 of 7 reviews

History

I have always been fascinated with lighthouses. A beacon of light high in a tower that warned sailors of danger and helped them safely guide their ships. I knew that there were people who maintained them but I had never really stopped to think about the type of person who took on this responsibility. Seven authors have joined to each write a novella about the lighthouses that were stationed along the Great Lakes between the years of 1883 to 1911. The Great Lighthouse Brides Collection offers readers the chance to imagine the lives of the men and women who served as lighthouse keepers. People who faced loneliness, hardship and danger as they kept the lighthouses going so that the journeys would be safe for the settlers who were forced to travel by ship. In each of these novellas female characters play an important part. There is an independent young woman who wants to earn a job as a lighthouse keeper, the young woman who needs to protect her secret to remain at the lighthouse, and another young woman seeking to find who left her as a baby on the lighthouse steps. One woman is helped by a male lighthouse keeper when she finds herself forced to return to the place that caused her so much misery and still another is rescued by a lighthouse keeper after losing her past memories to amnesia. Add the mystery of a shipwreck and a young woman grieving for her fiancee who died in a shipwreck and you have seven stories that will keep you engrossed. Historical fiction, yes, but there is also lots of romance and some of the stories simply take your breath away! I am very impressed with the ability of seven different authors to create stories that worked so well together. The Great Lakes Lighthouse Brides Collection is a great choice for anyone who only has short amounts of time to read and I recommend it to anyone who enjoys historical fiction and Christian romance. I received a complimentary copy of this book but a positive review was not required.

Lighthouses have alway...

Lighthouses have always fascinated me. I love everything about them, from their lifesaving purpose to their solitude, which has a special appeal for an introvert's heart. Symbolic of the Christian's duty, they shine through the darkness and guide others toward the light, illuminating the way around obstacles. As such, "The Great Lakes Lighthouse Brides Collection" is very apropos in combining seven historical romances spanning the years 1883 to 1911 and set on various lighthouse stations throughout the area. Each features an inspiring missive of hope that speaks to the inner, secret longings of the heart and to the larger message of salvation. Although some are as seemingly bereft as the islands that they inhabit, the heroines are the mainstay of this anthology. As romantic as the idea of living in a lighthouse sounds, the reality proves it to be a difficult life, especially for women. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, upkeep involved much more than simply lighting the lamp; maintaining the lighthouse and its environs required constant physical labor as well as tending to any shipwrecks that might occur. The women in these tales are duly stalwart in spirit, yet they are all the more endearing for their vulnerabilities. In one way or another, each young lady struggles with her identity. Some want to prove their merit as light keepers, while others seek to find their individual station in life, trials that continue today. Throughout the seven tales related in this book, the Lord becomes the bastion to which the characters cling, and He is still the One we should seek. Fans of Hazel Gaynor's "The Lighthouse Keeper's Daughter" will cherish this collection, as will any historical romance readers. In the featured story, Kathleen Rouser's "The Last Memory", an increasing sense of suspense pervades the tale as Natalie ("Mallory") experiences amnesia and finds herself at the Mackinac Point Lighthouse with keeper Cal Waterson, trying to discover her past and not realizing how much it will affect them both. Two of my other favorite stories were Candice Sue Patterson's "Beneath a Michigan Moon" and "The Disappearing Ship" by Lena Nelson Dooley. "Beneath a Michigan Moon" struck a chord with me because of Ava's illness and her battle with physical limitations and isolation, along with her release of self-sufficiency. "The Disappearing Ship" recalled one of my favorite fictional characters, Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, as Norma contended with her gender standing in the way of practicing medicine and also with a missing treasure. Each tale offers an uplifting narrative that speaks to our heart's desire to love and to be loved, to find our true identity in Christ. I received a complimentary copy of this book through CelebrateLit and was not required to post a favorable review. All opinions are my own.

The Great Lakes Light...

"The Great Lakes Lighthouse Brides Collection" provides seven short story perspectives on life in the Great Lakes lighthouses. The stories feature women in prominent roles as lighthouse keepers. I enjoyed the short story format, and the character descriptions really brought the characters to life. This book appealed to me not only as interesting stories about courageous women, but also because they were set in the Great Lakes area. Having grown up in this area and lived there much of my life, I found the setting intriguing and realistic. I also have visited several lighthouses, and could easily imagine the rugged nature of the lives portrayed in these stories. I received this book from the publisher and from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The opinions expressed here are entirely my own.

Lighthouses have alway...

Lighthouses have always fascinated me. I love everything about them, from their lifesaving purpose to their solitude, which has a special appeal for an introvert's heart. Symbolic of the Christian's duty, they shine through the darkness and guide others toward the light, illuminating the way around obstacles. As such, "The Great Lakes Lighthouse Brides Collection" is very apropos in combining seven historical romances spanning the years 1883 to 1911 and set on various lighthouse stations throughout the area. Each features an inspiring missive of hope that speaks to the inner, secret longings of the heart and to the larger message of salvation. Although some are as seemingly bereft as the islands that they inhabit, the heroines are the mainstay of this anthology. As romantic as the idea of living in a lighthouse sounds, the reality proves it to be a difficult life, especially for women. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, upkeep involved much more than simply lighting the lamp; maintaining the lighthouse and its environs required constant physical labor as well as tending to any shipwrecks that might occur. The women in these tales are duly stalwart in spirit, yet they are all the more endearing for their vulnerabilities. In one way or another, each young lady struggles with her identity. Some want to prove their merit as light keepers, while others seek to find their individual station in life, trials that continue today. Throughout the seven tales related in this book, the Lord becomes the bastion to which the characters cling, and He is still the One we should seek. Fans of Hazel Gaynor's "The Lighthouse Keeper's Daughter" will cherish this collection, as will any historical romance readers. In the featured story, Kathleen Rouser's "The Last Memory", an increasing sense of suspense pervades the tale as Natalie ("Mallory") experiences amnesia and finds herself at the Mackinac Point Lighthouse with keeper Cal Waterson, trying to discover her past and not realizing how much it will affect them both. Two of my other favorite stories were Candice Sue Patterson's "Beneath a Michigan Moon" and "The Disappearing Ship" by Lena Nelson Dooley. "Beneath a Michigan Moon" struck a chord with me because of Ava's illness and her battle with physical limitations and isolation, along with her release of self-sufficiency. "The Disappearing Ship" recalled one of my favorite fictional characters, Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, as Norma contended with her gender standing in the way of practicing medicine and also with a missing treasure. Each tale offers an uplifting narrative that speaks to our heart's desire to love and to be loved, to find our true identity in Christ. I received a complimentary copy of this book through CelebrateLit and was not required to post a favorable review. All opinions are my own.

I was excited to read ...

I was excited to read this book because I love lighthouses. I actually collect them and they have always fascinated me. They bring light to darkness and give hope for those lost. The book contains several stories and I loved how we get a taste of each author's style of writing. The stories are short and for some of them I wish they were longer because I felt the story ended too soon. Overall I was pleased with the book and thought the stories flowed easily from one to the next. There are a few stories that had similar plots which I was disappointed in. Anna's Tower by Pegg Thomas The first story is set in 1883 where a shipwreck has just happened. I liked the excitement the author built up as rescuers came to help. There is one man from the ship who may find himself in trouble if it is discovered who he is and how he came to be on the ship. Anna is a wonderful character and has dreams of running the lighthouse by herself one day. I would love to visit a lighthouse and see the beauty and power it displays. I really liked Makism and his gentle way he had around others. He was eager to work and the attraction between him and Anna was a breath of fresh air. The author does a great job of wanting readers to follow these two and see what happens between them. I loved the theme in the story about overcoming fear and trusting others. Beneath a Michigan Moon by Candice Sue Patterson This story finds us in 1885 at New Presque Isle Lighthouse, Lake Heron. I immediately liked the light hearted banter between Ava and Benjamin. He is insisting to see Ava's father, but there is a slight problem with that. How long can Ava hide her secret before others find out? Ava is a feisty young woman determined to do things on her own. The lighthouse is so important and she resents that snoopy Benjamin keeps coming around. There were times I found their encounters to be comical while Ava tries to discourage Benjamin from coming back to bother her so much. What does he want and why is he so interested in the lighthouse? The story is good and has wonderful details of the lighthouse. What will happen between Ava and Benjamin? It's a great story and I loved the characters. I wanted to spend more time with them and enjoy their connection that grew slowly. The unexpected twist in the story was well written and brings a barrier between Ava and Benjamin. This is a story is about forgiveness and new beginnings. Safe Haven by Rebecca Jepson We now get to visit Old Mission, Michigan in 1892. Rose is a very interesting character and I was intrigued about her past. It was hard for her to believe that someone left her at the lighthouse when she was an infant. Why would someone abandon such a special gift as a child? I have noticed a theme as I read each story so far. In this time period of the late 1800s it was not proper for a young woman to be alone with a man if they are not married. It was a refreshing thing to have women treated with respect and how their reputations were of the upmost concern. I am a bit disappointed that this story and the last one are kinda similar in story line. Both women are on their own after losing their father or grandfather. It does make the main character stronger but I was hoping for a little more variety. I did like the mystery surrounding Rose and loved the details of a past that has haunted Rose for years. Love's Beacon by Carrie Fancett Pagels Our travels take us to Mackinac Island starting in 1897. Val has traveled a distance to get medicine for her ill parents. When she gets ready to return home, she is told that she cannot travel there tonight. You could feel how distraught she was worrying about her parents. She is taken to the parish to spend the night. I could sense that Val would be receiving bad news soon. There is a mystery in this story about who Val's parents are. Again the story is very similar to the previous one. It is frustrating to read a story where you feel like it is almost the same plot as one you just read. Val gets work taking care of a child while the father works. I have to say I was intrigued to see how how the author would unravel Val's past. Will Val finally find out who her real parents are? There is a bit of romance in the story but I didn't find that it added anything to enhance the story. I have read other books that this author has read and always found them to be very good. This short story seemed rushed and not as detailed as she usually writes. The Last Memory by Kathleen Rouser This story opens up in 1899 where we find a young woman struggling to stay afloat before the waters take her away. The young woman is rescued but doesn't know who she is. I would not like to have amnesia. It would be frightening to not know who you are or where you came from. To be surrounded by strangers made the woman a bit on edge. The news that she is the only survivor of the Mallory shocks her. I adored the little girl in the story. She wants a mama so bad, she believes the sea has brought her one. Her father did tell her once that she would only have a mama if the Great Lakes coughed her up . I think her father has some explaining to do after the mysterious woman shows up from the sea. Cal is a good man and is willing to help Mallory as she calls herself. He wants to know who she really is as well ans its obvious that his daughter is starting to get attached to her. This story seemed to have a bit more mention of God and I found it be a welcome addition. The story did keep my interest and I did enjoy the ending. The Disappearing Ship by Lena Nelson Dooley Our journey finds us next in Upper Michigan in 1902. Norma is a female doctor who has found out that not many if anyone really welcomes a woman doctor. She feels like a failure and decides to go home to her aunt and uncle. This story was fun to read as a mysterious ship has disappeared . Did someone sabotage it or was the ship stolen because of what cargo it was carrying. Norma and Drake hit it off right away and she decides to help him find out what happened to the ship. The story is good and I loved how Drake trusted Norma by taking her with him as he looks for the whereabouts of his cargo. It's s a nice and tidy ending. The Wrong Survivor by Marilyn Turk We end our trip in 1911 at Au Sable Lighthouse. Jesse and Nathan go off to sea but only one brother returns. i could feel how guilty Jesse felt being the brother who survived. It reminds me of survivors guilt. You feel horrible that everyone you were with didn't make it and you wonder why you were spared. I liked how the author showed the bitterness Lydia had toward Jesse. it is a good story about forgiveness and I enjoyed reading how the characters found a way to overcome their guilt and try to become friends again. I received a copy of this book from Celebrate Lit and Barbour Publishing. The review is my own opinion.

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