It’s here! Your Black Friday ad has arrived. Preview ad
Your Black Friday ad has arrived.
Generated at Thu, 14 Nov 2019 09:09:27 GMT exp-ck: undefined; xpa: ;
Electrode, Comp-701326970, DC-prod-cdc04, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-19.1.31, SHA-771c9ce79737366b1d5f53d21cad4086bf722e21, CID-8f6165f4-65c-16e692cb32627e, Generated: Thu, 14 Nov 2019 09:09:27 GMT

The Golem's Eye

Walmart # 568729790
$16.52$16.52
Only 5 left!
Free delivery

Arrives by Tuesday, Nov 26

Pickup not available

Sold & shipped bythebookpros
As apprentice magician Nathaniel works his way up the ranks of the government, a crisis hits--an indestructible clay golem is making random attacks in London. Nathaniel and the djinni, Bartimeaus, must travel to Prague to discover the source of the golem's power.

Customer Review Snapshot

4 out of 5 stars
45 total reviews
5 stars
13
4 stars
23
3 stars
6
2 stars
3
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
The second book in Jonathan Stroud's Bartimaeus Trilogy, The Golem's Eye finds Nathaniel almost three years later as an important member of the government despite his youth. Some of his governmental duties include tracking down the Resistance, an elusive group of commoners challenging the magicians' power. Kitty, who was introduced briefly in the first book, becomes an important character in this story as the heart of the Resistance movement. She and several other young people have been born with a partial resilience to magic that enables them to resist magical attack. Other powers are also afoot in London with the advent of a mysterious clay golem. Who is controlling it? Nathaniel has to find out, and quick. Cue Bartimaeus! This story really zooms in on the cutthroat political scene of the magicians' bureaucratic government, and I can't help but be reminded of the Ministry of Magic in Rowling's Harry Potter series. But unlike Rowling, Stroud is unrelievedly pessimistic about those in power. On the way to the top you have to step on a lot of people, magician and commoner alike - and positively crush the lower orders of magical slaves like djinni. I've always been a bit skeptical of the apparent lack of ambition on the part of the Rowling's wizards. Let's be honest here: would powerful magicians really be content to sit on the sidelines in secret and play at having their own cute little magical government while the non-magical people rule the world? Uh, no. Power corrupts and what else is magic? Or at the very least, think of all the good the magicians could do by ruling the world! (At least, start out by doing.) Stroud's oligarchical society reflects a more accurate view of human nature and is therefore more believable. Another similarity between the Bartimaeus and Harry Potter books is how the boy-magician's role model (Gladstone for Nathaniel and Dumbledore for Harry) is deconstructed somewhat from a hero to a very flawed human being. Stroud takes it farther than Rowling does, revealing Gladstone as an oppressor and conqueror. Dumbledore gets off with a streaky history, it's true, but he's redeemed himself by years of service to others. It's interesting because Gladstone is set up as Nathaniel's inspiration in the first book when we don't know his real nature... and he's still that hero in the second even when we learn about his misdeeds. Nathaniel is learning to value power over everything else, and his hero keeps pace. The characters are deepened in this story, and again I was surprised to find how much I cared about their fates. Bartimaeus is hilarious, as usual, and though he is probably an unreliable narrator where his own interests are concerned, he does have some good insights on what is happening in Nathaniel. I absolutely love the character of Kitty. She's one of Stroud's best creations; she could walk off the page. With the development of her character we now have three different viewpoints on the story, Bartimaeus's first-person narration and two third-person voices following Nathaniel and Kitty in alternating chapters. Stroud keeps all the reins of his plotlines taut and takes his readers on quite a ride. I read this in a day, almost in a sitting, and when I finished it I couldn't wait to start the last book. Funny, sad, dark, and wry all at the same time - there's a reason this series made the bestseller lists. And don't forget the footnotes! Good stuff.

About This Item

We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it.
As apprentice magician Nathaniel works his way up the ranks of the government, a crisis hits--an indestructible clay golem is making random attacks in London. Nathaniel and the djinni, Bartimeaus, must travel to Prague to discover the source of the golem's power. The second adventure in the Bartimaeus trilogy finds Nathaniel working his way up the ranks of the government, when crisis hits. A seemingly invulnerable clay golem is making random attacks on London. Nathaniel and Bartimaeus must travel to Prague to discover the source of the golem's power.

Specifications

Series Title
Bartimaeus Trilogy (Pb)
Publisher
Perfection Learning
Book Format
Hardcover
Number of Pages
0
Author
Jonathan Stroud
ISBN-13
9780756965150
Publication Date
January, 2006
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
7.60 x 5.30 x 1.70 Inches
ISBN-10
0756965152

Customer Reviews

5 stars
13
4 stars
23
3 stars
6
2 stars
3
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
6 customers found this helpful
The second book in Jon...
The second book in Jonathan Stroud's Bartimaeus Trilogy, The Golem's Eye finds Nathaniel almost three years later as an important member of the government despite his youth. Some of his governmental duties include tracking down the Resistance, an elusive group of commoners challenging the magicians' power. Kitty, who was introduced briefly in the first book, becomes an important character in this story as the heart of the Resistance movement. She and several other young people have been born with a partial resilience to magic that enables them to resist magical attack. Other powers are also afoot in London with the advent of a mysterious clay golem. Who is controlling it? Nathaniel has to find out, and quick. Cue Bartimaeus! This story really zooms in on the cutthroat political scene of the magicians' bureaucratic government, and I can't help but be reminded of the Ministry of Magic in Rowling's Harry Potter series. But unlike Rowling, Stroud is unrelievedly pessimistic about those in power. On the way to the top you have to step on a lot of people, magician and commoner alike - and positively crush the lower orders of magical slaves like djinni. I've always been a bit skeptical of the apparent lack of ambition on the part of the Rowling's wizards. Let's be honest here: would powerful magicians really be content to sit on the sidelines in secret and play at having their own cute little magical government while the non-magical people rule the world? Uh, no. Power corrupts and what else is magic? Or at the very least, think of all the good the magicians could do by ruling the world! (At least, start out by doing.) Stroud's oligarchical society reflects a more accurate view of human nature and is therefore more believable. Another similarity between the Bartimaeus and Harry Potter books is how the boy-magician's role model (Gladstone for Nathaniel and Dumbledore for Harry) is deconstructed somewhat from a hero to a very flawed human being. Stroud takes it farther than Rowling does, revealing Gladstone as an oppressor and conqueror. Dumbledore gets off with a streaky history, it's true, but he's redeemed himself by years of service to others. It's interesting because Gladstone is set up as Nathaniel's inspiration in the first book when we don't know his real nature... and he's still that hero in the second even when we learn about his misdeeds. Nathaniel is learning to value power over everything else, and his hero keeps pace. The characters are deepened in this story, and again I was surprised to find how much I cared about their fates. Bartimaeus is hilarious, as usual, and though he is probably an unreliable narrator where his own interests are concerned, he does have some good insights on what is happening in Nathaniel. I absolutely love the character of Kitty. She's one of Stroud's best creations; she could walk off the page. With the development of her character we now have three different viewpoints on the story, Bartimaeus's first-person narration and two third-person voices following Nathaniel and Kitty in alternating chapters. Stroud keeps all the reins of his plotlines taut and takes his readers on quite a ride. I read this in a day, almost in a sitting, and when I finished it I couldn't wait to start the last book. Funny, sad, dark, and wry all at the same time - there's a reason this series made the bestseller lists. And don't forget the footnotes! Good stuff.
Most helpful negative review
I like this book even ...
I like this book even more than the first, though it's a bit marred by all the memory scenes of Kitty.
Most helpful positive review
6 customers found this helpful
The second book in Jon...
The second book in Jonathan Stroud's Bartimaeus Trilogy, The Golem's Eye finds Nathaniel almost three years later as an important member of the government despite his youth. Some of his governmental duties include tracking down the Resistance, an elusive group of commoners challenging the magicians' power. Kitty, who was introduced briefly in the first book, becomes an important character in this story as the heart of the Resistance movement. She and several other young people have been born with a partial resilience to magic that enables them to resist magical attack. Other powers are also afoot in London with the advent of a mysterious clay golem. Who is controlling it? Nathaniel has to find out, and quick. Cue Bartimaeus! This story really zooms in on the cutthroat political scene of the magicians' bureaucratic government, and I can't help but be reminded of the Ministry of Magic in Rowling's Harry Potter series. But unlike Rowling, Stroud is unrelievedly pessimistic about those in power. On the way to the top you have to step on a lot of people, magician and commoner alike - and positively crush the lower orders of magical slaves like djinni. I've always been a bit skeptical of the apparent lack of ambition on the part of the Rowling's wizards. Let's be honest here: would powerful magicians really be content to sit on the sidelines in secret and play at having their own cute little magical government while the non-magical people rule the world? Uh, no. Power corrupts and what else is magic? Or at the very least, think of all the good the magicians could do by ruling the world! (At least, start out by doing.) Stroud's oligarchical society reflects a more accurate view of human nature and is therefore more believable. Another similarity between the Bartimaeus and Harry Potter books is how the boy-magician's role model (Gladstone for Nathaniel and Dumbledore for Harry) is deconstructed somewhat from a hero to a very flawed human being. Stroud takes it farther than Rowling does, revealing Gladstone as an oppressor and conqueror. Dumbledore gets off with a streaky history, it's true, but he's redeemed himself by years of service to others. It's interesting because Gladstone is set up as Nathaniel's inspiration in the first book when we don't know his real nature... and he's still that hero in the second even when we learn about his misdeeds. Nathaniel is learning to value power over everything else, and his hero keeps pace. The characters are deepened in this story, and again I was surprised to find how much I cared about their fates. Bartimaeus is hilarious, as usual, and though he is probably an unreliable narrator where his own interests are concerned, he does have some good insights on what is happening in Nathaniel. I absolutely love the character of Kitty. She's one of Stroud's best creations; she could walk off the page. With the development of her character we now have three different viewpoints on the story, Bartimaeus's first-person narration and two third-person voices following Nathaniel and Kitty in alternating chapters. Stroud keeps all the reins of his plotlines taut and takes his readers on quite a ride. I read this in a day, almost in a sitting, and when I finished it I couldn't wait to start the last book. Funny, sad, dark, and wry all at the same time - there's a reason this series made the bestseller lists. And don't forget the footnotes! Good stuff.
Most helpful negative review
I like this book even ...
I like this book even more than the first, though it's a bit marred by all the memory scenes of Kitty.
1-5 of 45 reviews

Nearly three years aft...

Nearly three years after the events described in The Amulet of Samarkand, Nathaniel has gone up in the world: he's now a junior minister in the Department for Internal Affairs and apprenticed to the eminent magician and Security Minister Jessica Whitwell, and tasked with capturing the ringleaders of the Resistance. When several shops catering for a magician clientele in Piccadilly are raided - their ground floors virtually destroyed and several officers of the Night Police killed - the general suspicion immediately falls on the Resistance. But Nathaniel has doubts, and summons Bartimaeus once again to find the real perpetrator. A worthy (and improved) follow-up to The Amulet of Samarkand, The Golem's Eye oozes atmosphere, tension, style, wit and a few heart-stopping moments of sheer terror. The action takes place both in London and Prague, and the stakes are raised considerably. The reader learns more about the beginnings of the Resistance and about Kitty Jones in particular, and it was Kitty's story and her independent spirit and bravery that was the big surprise for me; unfortunately Nathaniel doesn't come away from this as a very empathetic character, and I hope the rest of the series won't shape up in such a way as to make the reader choose between Kitty and Nathaniel. Where its predecessor was one mad chase after another, this title had quite a different pace to it, which may not endear it to those who expect more action as that featured in The Amulet of Samarkand, but in my opinion the darker mood of the entire book and its predominant focus on the three major characters made this a superior, intelligent and very enjoyable read. Not everything is tied up neatly at the end, and I can't wait how the story progresses. The next volume in the sequence, Ptolemy's Gate, is already lined up.

I love so many differe...

I love so many different things about this book! Simon Jones narrations beautifully. Humor weaves through, sometimes subtle and dry, sometimes slapstick, and always supporting the story and the characters. The characters are all very real with depth and complexity. I hope to get my nephew to listen to this trilogy. Without any hint of pedantry, the story teaches about loyalty, bravery, and honor. While the world is far from perfect, the characters manage to make a difference by their choices. Sometimes it's a very small difference, and sometimes it's a more far-reaching effect than the characters realize. I'm a bit afraid to start another young adult series. This one and Ranger's Apprentice have quite spoiled me :)

Nathaniel is two years...

Nathaniel is two years older than he was in book #1. He now has a position of some influence among the magicians, and (sadly) he seems to have been indoctrinated into their competitive, cutthroat, and ethically bankrupt society. The magicians form a minority, but it monopolizes wealth and power. It exploits and oppresses the masses of non-magical commoners at home and wages cruel war on people beyond. But there is a resistance movement....Despite this reasonably accurate summary, this isn't really a dark fantasy. There's a certain Pratchett-like quality to it. It addresses some serious themes in lighthearted, entertaining ways. But most importantly, it's an enjoyable read.

Now under the apprenti...

Now under the apprenticeship of Jessica Whitwell and going by the magician name John Mandrake, Nathaniel again calls on the djinni Bartimaeus to help him track down the Resistance, that band of commoners (ie., non-magic folk) that are causing the magicians trouble in London. As in The Amulet of Samarkand, we have the first-person, snarky and footnote-strewn narration of Bartimaeus and the third-person perspective of Nathaniel; added to this now is Kitty, the mysterious commoner first encountered in an alley trying to steal the amulet from Bartimaeus. We get more of her background and how exactly she became involved in the Resistance. Nathaniel (who has become more of a magician and less of the sympathetic young boy from the first book) and Bartimaeus become involved in magician politics while Mandrake tries to rise in power and prestige and Bartimaeus just tries to stay alive. Simon Jones narrates fabulously, and the books are fun to reread as you can see how seamlessly Stroud has created the alternate history and plot of this trilogy.

The second book in Jon...

The second book in Jonathan Stroud's Bartimaeus Trilogy, The Golem's Eye finds Nathaniel almost three years later as an important member of the government despite his youth. Some of his governmental duties include tracking down the Resistance, an elusive group of commoners challenging the magicians' power. Kitty, who was introduced briefly in the first book, becomes an important character in this story as the heart of the Resistance movement. She and several other young people have been born with a partial resilience to magic that enables them to resist magical attack. Other powers are also afoot in London with the advent of a mysterious clay golem. Who is controlling it? Nathaniel has to find out, and quick. Cue Bartimaeus! This story really zooms in on the cutthroat political scene of the magicians' bureaucratic government, and I can't help but be reminded of the Ministry of Magic in Rowling's Harry Potter series. But unlike Rowling, Stroud is unrelievedly pessimistic about those in power. On the way to the top you have to step on a lot of people, magician and commoner alike - and positively crush the lower orders of magical slaves like djinni. I've always been a bit skeptical of the apparent lack of ambition on the part of the Rowling's wizards. Let's be honest here: would powerful magicians really be content to sit on the sidelines in secret and play at having their own cute little magical government while the non-magical people rule the world? Uh, no. Power corrupts and what else is magic? Or at the very least, think of all the good the magicians could do by ruling the world! (At least, start out by doing.) Stroud's oligarchical society reflects a more accurate view of human nature and is therefore more believable. Another similarity between the Bartimaeus and Harry Potter books is how the boy-magician's role model (Gladstone for Nathaniel and Dumbledore for Harry) is deconstructed somewhat from a hero to a very flawed human being. Stroud takes it farther than Rowling does, revealing Gladstone as an oppressor and conqueror. Dumbledore gets off with a streaky history, it's true, but he's redeemed himself by years of service to others. It's interesting because Gladstone is set up as Nathaniel's inspiration in the first book when we don't know his real nature... and he's still that hero in the second even when we learn about his misdeeds. Nathaniel is learning to value power over everything else, and his hero keeps pace. The characters are deepened in this story, and again I was surprised to find how much I cared about their fates. Bartimaeus is hilarious, as usual, and though he is probably an unreliable narrator where his own interests are concerned, he does have some good insights on what is happening in Nathaniel. I absolutely love the character of Kitty. She's one of Stroud's best creations; she could walk off the page. With the development of her character we now have three different viewpoints on the story, Bartimaeus's first-person narration and two third-person voices following Nathaniel and Kitty in alternating chapters. Stroud keeps all the reins of his plotlines taut and takes his readers on quite a ride. I read this in a day, almost in a sitting, and when I finished it I couldn't wait to start the last book. Funny, sad, dark, and wry all at the same time - there's a reason this series made the bestseller lists. And don't forget the footnotes! Good stuff.

Customer Q&A

Get specific details about this product from customers who own it.

Policies & Plans

Pricing policy

About our prices
We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything. So if you find a current lower price from an online retailer on an identical, in-stock product, tell us and we'll match it. See more details atOnline Price Match.
webapp branch
Electrode, Comp-389269092, DC-prod-cdc04, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-30.0.3, SHA-fe0221a6ef49da0ab2505dfeca6fe7a05293b900, CID-b45e6a10-c15-16e693248e091a, Generated: Thu, 14 Nov 2019 09:15:33 GMT