The English Eccentrics

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Eccentricity exists particularly in the English, states Dame Edith Sitwell, because of that peculiar and satisfactory knowledge of infallibility that is the hallmark and the birthright of the British nation. Originally published in 1933, " The English Eccentrics "has lost none of its vitality and wit. We find hermits, quacks, mariners, indefatigable travelers, and men of learning. We meet the amphibious Lord Rokeby, whose beard reached his knees and who seldom left his bath; the irascible Captain Thicknesses, who left his right hand, to be cut off after his death, to his son Lord Audley; and Curricle Coats, the Gifted Amateur, whose suit was sewn with diamonds and whose every performance ended in uproar.This is a glorious gallery of the extremes of human nature, portrayed with humor, sympathy, knowledge, and love."

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Eccentricity exists particularly in the English, states Dame Edith Sitwell, because of that peculiar and satisfactory knowledge of infallibility that is the hallmark and the birthright of the British nation. Originally published in 1933, " The English Eccentrics "has lost none of its vitality and wit. We find hermits, quacks, mariners, indefatigable travelers, and men of learning. We meet the amphibious Lord Rokeby, whose beard reached his knees and who seldom left his bath; the irascible Captain Thicknesses, who left his right hand, to be cut off after his death, to his son Lord Audley; and Curricle Coats, the Gifted Amateur, whose suit was sewn with diamonds and whose every performance ended in uproar.This is a glorious gallery of the extremes of human nature, portrayed with humor, sympathy, knowledge, and love."
Eccentricity exists particularly in the English, states Dame Edith Sitwell, because of “that peculiar and satisfactory knowledge of infallibility that is the hallmark and the birthright of the British nation.” Originally published in 1933, The English Eccentrics has lost none of its vitality and wit. We find hermits, quacks, mariners, indefatigable travelers, and men of learning. We meet the amphibious Lord Rokeby, whose beard reached his knees and who seldom left his bath; the irascible Captain Thicknesses, who left his right hand, to be cut off after his death, to his son Lord Audley; and Curricle Coats, the Gifted Amateur, whose suit was sewn with diamonds and whose every performance ended in uproar. This is a glorious gallery of the extremes of human nature, portrayed with humor, sympathy, knowledge, and love.

Specifications

Publisher
Pallas Athene
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
376
Author
Edith Sitwell
ISBN-13
9781873429730
Publication Date
October, 2005
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
8.30 x 5.40 x 0.95 Inches
ISBN-10
1873429738

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Delightful reading on ...

Delightful reading on a rainy night.

Eccentricity exists p...

"Eccentricity exists particularly in the English", June 8, 2014 This review is from: English Eccentrics a Gallery of Weird (Paperback) A variable collection of characters, from the true eccentrics to those who would hardly seem to qualify. The former include such individuals as the 'amphibious' lord Rokeby ; the 'not entirely pleasing' Celestina Collins, who shared her bed with thirty fowls; Squire Mytton, who frightened his hiccups away by setting his nightshirt on fire... I was entertained by the account of Mr Coates, a Shakespearean actor who never quite cut the mustard: 'Mr Coates appeared at The Theatre Royal, Richmond...and again no attempt was made upon his life. indeed, the only lives that were in danger were those of certain unfeeling young gentlemen, who, in the scene where the hero poisons himself, were seized with such immoderate paroxysms of laughter that a doctor who was present became alarmed at their condition, and ordered them to be carried into the open air, where they received medical attention.' Edith Sitwell's sarcastic tone adds to the narrative: 'Others of Miss Martineau's neighbours were hardly respectable, but like a comfortable Christian woman Miss Martineau said no more about them than would destroy their reputation for respectability and enhance her own.' I found her writing extremely hard to get into on the first page, but soon got used to it. The last 60 pages or so I found less interesting: a lengthy investigation into people exhuming the (reported) grave of Milton, and removing parts of the body to sell; a description of the Carlyles. Neither seemed really relevant to the theme of the book. In conclusion then, interesting in parts.

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