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Electrode, Comp-815878649, DC-prod-az-southcentralus-14, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-19.1.31, SHA-771c9ce79737366b1d5f53d21cad4086bf722e21, CID-3645f807-25a-16e714e5ab9f4e, Generated: Fri, 15 Nov 2019 23:03:10 GMT

The Divine Invasion

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9781455832002

Customer Review Snapshot

3.3 out of 5 stars
7 total reviews
5 stars
0
4 stars
4
3 stars
1
2 stars
2
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
Whether you enjoy him or not, I think that it'd be difficult to argue that our dear, departed Philip K. didn't write some of the most jarringly original novels that ever made it to print. From a certain perspective, "The Divine Invasion" covers a lot ground that will be familiar to PKD fans: psychic meddling, conspiracies, an obsession with multiple realities. (Really was there ever a writer who got more millage out of the idea that life could be but a dream?) Even so, "The Divine Invasion's inclusion of overtly religious and supernatural elements sets it apart from most SF: this isn't Asimov imagining a religious pseudo-future for science; the author's interest in religion-as-such seems genuine and well-informed. It's obvious that Dick spent a lot of time with some very arcane texts and little-known heresies while writing this one. Folklore, Gnostic musings, and obscure Jewish creation stories abound here, but they're more than just window dressing. The fact that they're essential to the book's plot sometimes gives one the impression that PKD's doing his darndest to invent a genre that might be termed "hard fantasy." Esoteric as a lot of this might seem, much of "The Divine Invasion," which also has its share of interstellar space travel and cryogenic suspension, comes off as shockingly immediate. A two or three decades worth of spooky little kids in horror movies didn't quite prepare me for the decidedly unnerving spectacle of two ten year olds, Manny, our Christ analogue, and his mysterious, playfully seductive friend Zina discussing the fate of the universe in a run-down special-needs school. The plot of "The Divine Invasion" is, in places frustratingly twisty, and, this being PKD, you the author's not too keen to give the question "is this really happening" a straight answer. I suspect that many committed PKD fans will have to read this one more than once to figure out exactly what's going on. Still, at the heart of the book there's a serious theological debate about the potential character flaws of the Old Testament God and the role of play in His creation. The theology in this one is almost entirely Jewish: Jesus barely gets a cameo appearance here. But as the novel nears its end, Dick makes a convincing case that evil tends to be dead serious: a distinct lack of a sense of humor is one of true evil's hallmarks. Of course, that's you could say that that's a typically Phildickian argument, but it's one worth taking away. I should track down the first book in this trilogy next, just to catch up.

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9781455832002 The Divine Invasion

Specifications

Series Title
Valis
Publisher
Brilliance Audio Lib Edn
Book Format
Other
Original Languages
English
Author
Dick, Philip K.
ISBN-13
9781455832002
Publication Date
October, 2011
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
6.50 x 6.75 x 1.00 Inches
ISBN-10
1455832006

Customer Reviews

5 stars
0
4 stars
4
3 stars
1
2 stars
2
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
2 customers found this helpful
Whether you enjoy him ...
Whether you enjoy him or not, I think that it'd be difficult to argue that our dear, departed Philip K. didn't write some of the most jarringly original novels that ever made it to print. From a certain perspective, "The Divine Invasion" covers a lot ground that will be familiar to PKD fans: psychic meddling, conspiracies, an obsession with multiple realities. (Really was there ever a writer who got more millage out of the idea that life could be but a dream?) Even so, "The Divine Invasion's inclusion of overtly religious and supernatural elements sets it apart from most SF: this isn't Asimov imagining a religious pseudo-future for science; the author's interest in religion-as-such seems genuine and well-informed. It's obvious that Dick spent a lot of time with some very arcane texts and little-known heresies while writing this one. Folklore, Gnostic musings, and obscure Jewish creation stories abound here, but they're more than just window dressing. The fact that they're essential to the book's plot sometimes gives one the impression that PKD's doing his darndest to invent a genre that might be termed "hard fantasy." Esoteric as a lot of this might seem, much of "The Divine Invasion," which also has its share of interstellar space travel and cryogenic suspension, comes off as shockingly immediate. A two or three decades worth of spooky little kids in horror movies didn't quite prepare me for the decidedly unnerving spectacle of two ten year olds, Manny, our Christ analogue, and his mysterious, playfully seductive friend Zina discussing the fate of the universe in a run-down special-needs school. The plot of "The Divine Invasion" is, in places frustratingly twisty, and, this being PKD, you the author's not too keen to give the question "is this really happening" a straight answer. I suspect that many committed PKD fans will have to read this one more than once to figure out exactly what's going on. Still, at the heart of the book there's a serious theological debate about the potential character flaws of the Old Testament God and the role of play in His creation. The theology in this one is almost entirely Jewish: Jesus barely gets a cameo appearance here. But as the novel nears its end, Dick makes a convincing case that evil tends to be dead serious: a distinct lack of a sense of humor is one of true evil's hallmarks. Of course, that's you could say that that's a typically Phildickian argument, but it's one worth taking away. I should track down the first book in this trilogy next, just to catch up.
Most helpful negative review
1 customers found this helpful
Perhaps someone will d...
Perhaps someone will disagree, but I found this to be simply too weird and disjointed to enjoy. I think this happened to Dick novels after a while, unfortunately.
Most helpful positive review
2 customers found this helpful
Whether you enjoy him ...
Whether you enjoy him or not, I think that it'd be difficult to argue that our dear, departed Philip K. didn't write some of the most jarringly original novels that ever made it to print. From a certain perspective, "The Divine Invasion" covers a lot ground that will be familiar to PKD fans: psychic meddling, conspiracies, an obsession with multiple realities. (Really was there ever a writer who got more millage out of the idea that life could be but a dream?) Even so, "The Divine Invasion's inclusion of overtly religious and supernatural elements sets it apart from most SF: this isn't Asimov imagining a religious pseudo-future for science; the author's interest in religion-as-such seems genuine and well-informed. It's obvious that Dick spent a lot of time with some very arcane texts and little-known heresies while writing this one. Folklore, Gnostic musings, and obscure Jewish creation stories abound here, but they're more than just window dressing. The fact that they're essential to the book's plot sometimes gives one the impression that PKD's doing his darndest to invent a genre that might be termed "hard fantasy." Esoteric as a lot of this might seem, much of "The Divine Invasion," which also has its share of interstellar space travel and cryogenic suspension, comes off as shockingly immediate. A two or three decades worth of spooky little kids in horror movies didn't quite prepare me for the decidedly unnerving spectacle of two ten year olds, Manny, our Christ analogue, and his mysterious, playfully seductive friend Zina discussing the fate of the universe in a run-down special-needs school. The plot of "The Divine Invasion" is, in places frustratingly twisty, and, this being PKD, you the author's not too keen to give the question "is this really happening" a straight answer. I suspect that many committed PKD fans will have to read this one more than once to figure out exactly what's going on. Still, at the heart of the book there's a serious theological debate about the potential character flaws of the Old Testament God and the role of play in His creation. The theology in this one is almost entirely Jewish: Jesus barely gets a cameo appearance here. But as the novel nears its end, Dick makes a convincing case that evil tends to be dead serious: a distinct lack of a sense of humor is one of true evil's hallmarks. Of course, that's you could say that that's a typically Phildickian argument, but it's one worth taking away. I should track down the first book in this trilogy next, just to catch up.
Most helpful negative review
1 customers found this helpful
Perhaps someone will d...
Perhaps someone will disagree, but I found this to be simply too weird and disjointed to enjoy. I think this happened to Dick novels after a while, unfortunately.
1-5 of 7 reviews

Whether you enjoy him ...

Whether you enjoy him or not, I think that it'd be difficult to argue that our dear, departed Philip K. didn't write some of the most jarringly original novels that ever made it to print. From a certain perspective, "The Divine Invasion" covers a lot ground that will be familiar to PKD fans: psychic meddling, conspiracies, an obsession with multiple realities. (Really was there ever a writer who got more millage out of the idea that life could be but a dream?) Even so, "The Divine Invasion's inclusion of overtly religious and supernatural elements sets it apart from most SF: this isn't Asimov imagining a religious pseudo-future for science; the author's interest in religion-as-such seems genuine and well-informed. It's obvious that Dick spent a lot of time with some very arcane texts and little-known heresies while writing this one. Folklore, Gnostic musings, and obscure Jewish creation stories abound here, but they're more than just window dressing. The fact that they're essential to the book's plot sometimes gives one the impression that PKD's doing his darndest to invent a genre that might be termed "hard fantasy." Esoteric as a lot of this might seem, much of "The Divine Invasion," which also has its share of interstellar space travel and cryogenic suspension, comes off as shockingly immediate. A two or three decades worth of spooky little kids in horror movies didn't quite prepare me for the decidedly unnerving spectacle of two ten year olds, Manny, our Christ analogue, and his mysterious, playfully seductive friend Zina discussing the fate of the universe in a run-down special-needs school. The plot of "The Divine Invasion" is, in places frustratingly twisty, and, this being PKD, you the author's not too keen to give the question "is this really happening" a straight answer. I suspect that many committed PKD fans will have to read this one more than once to figure out exactly what's going on. Still, at the heart of the book there's a serious theological debate about the potential character flaws of the Old Testament God and the role of play in His creation. The theology in this one is almost entirely Jewish: Jesus barely gets a cameo appearance here. But as the novel nears its end, Dick makes a convincing case that evil tends to be dead serious: a distinct lack of a sense of humor is one of true evil's hallmarks. Of course, that's you could say that that's a typically Phildickian argument, but it's one worth taking away. I should track down the first book in this trilogy next, just to catch up.

I listened to the Audi...

I listened to the Audio Version of this book. Valis One was incredibly rich, full of literary nuggets. The Divine Invasion, the sequel, is an interesting adventure.I like this book more than VALIS... but both works are needed to understand the full vision and exegesis of Philip K. Dick. His exegesis of the Church is quit funny. for example the main narrator says "I am God's legal father." I can see where Douglas Adams may have got his ideas for the great computer and the ultimate answer of Life The Universe and Everything: 42. This type of book requires one to let the book evolve, and not attempt to confine it within an A-B=C plot line. The reader starts out in a simple pulpy reality of melodramatic science fiction. The melodramatic scene begins to unravel, as one ascends. The roller coaster takes you to a realm full of chaotic characters and scenes as imagined in Disney's Haunted House. We turn in the dark, and descend on a roller coaster built incredibly tall. So the descent takes us into a totally paranoid alternatereality. By the book's end, there is nothing trustworthy left in the world.' said Australian critic Bruce Gillespie. So, if you like your plot lines straight, and easy than Philip K. Dick may upset your settled reality. If however you understand that Phillip K. Dick will throw you for a loop, one can deal with confusion and being in the dark at times.The book was a tremendous journey into the lines between reality and make believe.

I listened to the Audi...

I listened to the Audio Version of this book. Valis One was incredibly rich, full of literary nuggets. The Divine Invasion, the sequel, is an interesting adventure.I like this book more than VALIS... but both works are needed to understand the full vision and exegesis of Philip K. Dick. His exegesis of the Church is quit funny. for example the main narrator says "I am God's legal father." I can see where Douglas Adams may have got his ideas for the great computer and the ultimate answer of Life The Universe and Everything: 42. This type of book requires one to let the book evolve, and not attempt to confine it within an A-B=C plot line. The reader starts out in a simple pulpy reality of melodramatic science fiction. The melodramatic scene begins to unravel, as one ascends. The roller coaster takes you to a realm full of chaotic characters and scenes as imagined in Disney's Haunted House. We turn in the dark, and descend on a roller coaster built incredibly tall. So the descent takes us into a totally paranoid alternatereality. By the book's end, there is nothing trustworthy left in the world.' said Australian critic Bruce Gillespie. So, if you like your plot lines straight, and easy than Philip K. Dick may upset your settled reality. If however you understand that Phillip K. Dick will throw you for a loop, one can deal with confusion and being in the dark at times.The book was a tremendous journey into the lines between reality and make believe.

This isnt even close ...

This isn't even close to a recap of the plot of this book. We start out by going back in forth in time, only to find out some of the "back" is false memory. A man winds up marrying a pregnant woman to smuggle the unborn "savior" back to earth. The savior gets born. There is confrontation with a "devil". And an artificial intelligence tries to jump in and mess up the plans. There is a lot more strangeness, but trying to describe or explain it would only confuse. It is a weird trip as Dick tackles his thoughts about God in the second of three books that are loosely linked on the subject. It is not to everyone's taste. And many fans of Dick dismiss or actively hate this part of Dick's writing. Yet, in its own way, it is classic Dick - unsure of which reality is real, trying to determine how it all fits together, and exploration of broad themes through bizarre circumstances. This book stands well on its own. And it reads well as the follow-up to VALIS. It will not be an easy read (good Philip K. Dick never is), but it contains rewards worth working for.

Dick uses teachings of...

Dick uses teachings of mystical Judaism and Christianity in an attempt to explain his unsettling sense of another reality breaking through this one and proving it to be illusory. Interesting ideas but the book seems a bit more like notes for a book rather than the book itself.

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Electrode, Comp-805471381, DC-prod-az-southcentralus-17, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-30.0.3, SHA-fe0221a6ef49da0ab2505dfeca6fe7a05293b900, CID-54bfcfb6-a6b-16e71554ba7376, Generated: Fri, 15 Nov 2019 23:10:45 GMT