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The Da Vinci Code (The Young Adult Adaptation)

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9781524734862 Dan Brown’s mega-bestseller is now available for a new generation of readers. This young adult adaptation is the perfect way to get ready for Origin, the latest novel featuring the character Robert Langdon. It will remind fans everywhere why the New York Times calls The Da Vinci Code “blockbuster perfection.” 

Includes over twenty color photos showing important locations, landmarks, and artwork, taking readers from Paris to London and beyond!

      
The greatest conspiracy of the past two thousand years is about to unravel.
 
Robert Langdon, professor of religious symbology at Harvard, is in Paris to give a lecture. At the reception that follows, he is scheduled to meet with a revered curator from the world-famous Louvre museum. But the curator never shows up, and later that night Langdon is awakened by authorities and told that the curator has been found dead. He is then taken to the Louvre—the scene of the crime—where he finds out that baffling clues have been left behind.
 
Thus begins a race against time, as Robert Langdon becomes a suspect and, with the help of French cryptologist Sophie Neveu, must decipher a mystifying trail of clues that the two come to realize have been left specifically for them. If Robert and Sophie cannot solve the puzzle in time, an ancient truth could be lost forever—and they themselves might end up as collateral damage.
 
Praise for the adult edition of The Da Vinci Code
 
“WOW . . . Blockbuster perfection. An exhilaratingly brainy thriller. Not since the advent of Harry Potter has an author so flagrantly delighted in leading readers on a breathless chase and coaxing them through hoops.”— The New York Times
 
“A new master of smart thrills. A pulse-quickening, brain-teasing adventure.”— People

Specifications

Series Title
Robert Langdon
Publisher
Listening Library (Audio), Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group
Book Format
Other
Original Languages
English
Author
Dan Brown
ISBN-13
9781524734862
Publication Date
September, 2016
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
5.90 x 5.10 x 1.20 Inches
ISBN-10
1524734861

Customer Reviews

5 stars
114
4 stars
143
3 stars
119
2 stars
61
1 star
63
Most helpful positive review
8 customers found this helpful
This is one of those b...
This is one of those books that I avoided reading for a long time. Sure, it was popular, and it had an intriguing concept, and a lot of people thought it was very good. A lot of writer people, however, denigrated the book, saying it had too many adjectives and adverbs, among other things. When I finally did get around to reading it, I was surprised to find myself drawn inexorably into the story. The Da Vinci Code begins with Robert Langdon being called to the Louvre museum, where there has been a bizarre murder. Langdon, an expert symbologist, winds up becoming both a suspect in the case and the only investigator who really understands it. Together with Sophie Neveu, a police cryptographer who turns out to be the victim's granddaughter, Langdon sets off on an urgent quest to solve the crime. As Langdon and Neveu race from clue to clue, the plot unfolds to huge proportions, including murderous conspiracies and secret societies, with nothing less than the Catholic church at stake. As a story, The Da Vinci Code is very well done. It captures the reader's interest from the start and holds it throughout Langdon and Neveu's headlong dash through the night. The characters are well drawn, if awkward in places. The locales are exotic, and the settings intricately detailed. The plot itself is a masterwork. The fact that this book has spawned so many other books to discredit it is testimony to the authenticity and credibility of its voice. To be honest, there are places in the book where the structure of the sentences falls into a pattern that is humorous and annoying if you recognize it. The vast intricacy of the plot and the convincing detail of the setting, however, more than compensate for any deficiency of character or sentence structure. As a writer, I found much more to covet here than to ridicule. All in all, I think The Da Vinci Code is a new classic. Many people still discount the work, but I'm not sure how a true bibliophile could justify avoiding it. The book has become a phenomenon, an icon of modern success in the book industry. And, underneath it all, it really is a good story.
Most helpful negative review
9 customers found this helpful
Id like to go on reco...
I'd like to go on record as stating that the conspiracy theory underpinning this exceptionally boring novel neither interests, nor offends me: I do not object to this book on any moral or religious grounds. Nor do I consider the term "popular fiction" an example of invective: I am not a book snob and I relish a good pot-boiler. The alleged lineage of Christ and the book's positioning on the bestseller list are entirely irrelevant to the fact that The Da Vinci Code is earth-shatteringly, mind-numbingly dull. "Boring" appears a pallid and inadequate adjective when applied to this tepid and ponderous novel. I anticipated this novel eagerly: I was looking foward to a fun, no-brainer, page turner. What I found was a insipid imitation of the work of better thriller writers: a cliche ridden, interminable piece of tash that wound its way through a leaden plot, to a sluggish climax.
Most helpful positive review
8 customers found this helpful
This is one of those b...
This is one of those books that I avoided reading for a long time. Sure, it was popular, and it had an intriguing concept, and a lot of people thought it was very good. A lot of writer people, however, denigrated the book, saying it had too many adjectives and adverbs, among other things. When I finally did get around to reading it, I was surprised to find myself drawn inexorably into the story. The Da Vinci Code begins with Robert Langdon being called to the Louvre museum, where there has been a bizarre murder. Langdon, an expert symbologist, winds up becoming both a suspect in the case and the only investigator who really understands it. Together with Sophie Neveu, a police cryptographer who turns out to be the victim's granddaughter, Langdon sets off on an urgent quest to solve the crime. As Langdon and Neveu race from clue to clue, the plot unfolds to huge proportions, including murderous conspiracies and secret societies, with nothing less than the Catholic church at stake. As a story, The Da Vinci Code is very well done. It captures the reader's interest from the start and holds it throughout Langdon and Neveu's headlong dash through the night. The characters are well drawn, if awkward in places. The locales are exotic, and the settings intricately detailed. The plot itself is a masterwork. The fact that this book has spawned so many other books to discredit it is testimony to the authenticity and credibility of its voice. To be honest, there are places in the book where the structure of the sentences falls into a pattern that is humorous and annoying if you recognize it. The vast intricacy of the plot and the convincing detail of the setting, however, more than compensate for any deficiency of character or sentence structure. As a writer, I found much more to covet here than to ridicule. All in all, I think The Da Vinci Code is a new classic. Many people still discount the work, but I'm not sure how a true bibliophile could justify avoiding it. The book has become a phenomenon, an icon of modern success in the book industry. And, underneath it all, it really is a good story.
Most helpful negative review
9 customers found this helpful
Id like to go on reco...
I'd like to go on record as stating that the conspiracy theory underpinning this exceptionally boring novel neither interests, nor offends me: I do not object to this book on any moral or religious grounds. Nor do I consider the term "popular fiction" an example of invective: I am not a book snob and I relish a good pot-boiler. The alleged lineage of Christ and the book's positioning on the bestseller list are entirely irrelevant to the fact that The Da Vinci Code is earth-shatteringly, mind-numbingly dull. "Boring" appears a pallid and inadequate adjective when applied to this tepid and ponderous novel. I anticipated this novel eagerly: I was looking foward to a fun, no-brainer, page turner. What I found was a insipid imitation of the work of better thriller writers: a cliche ridden, interminable piece of tash that wound its way through a leaden plot, to a sluggish climax.
1-5 of 500 reviews

This is one of those b...

This is one of those books that I avoided reading for a long time. Sure, it was popular, and it had an intriguing concept, and a lot of people thought it was very good. A lot of writer people, however, denigrated the book, saying it had too many adjectives and adverbs, among other things. When I finally did get around to reading it, I was surprised to find myself drawn inexorably into the story. The Da Vinci Code begins with Robert Langdon being called to the Louvre museum, where there has been a bizarre murder. Langdon, an expert symbologist, winds up becoming both a suspect in the case and the only investigator who really understands it. Together with Sophie Neveu, a police cryptographer who turns out to be the victim's granddaughter, Langdon sets off on an urgent quest to solve the crime. As Langdon and Neveu race from clue to clue, the plot unfolds to huge proportions, including murderous conspiracies and secret societies, with nothing less than the Catholic church at stake. As a story, The Da Vinci Code is very well done. It captures the reader's interest from the start and holds it throughout Langdon and Neveu's headlong dash through the night. The characters are well drawn, if awkward in places. The locales are exotic, and the settings intricately detailed. The plot itself is a masterwork. The fact that this book has spawned so many other books to discredit it is testimony to the authenticity and credibility of its voice. To be honest, there are places in the book where the structure of the sentences falls into a pattern that is humorous and annoying if you recognize it. The vast intricacy of the plot and the convincing detail of the setting, however, more than compensate for any deficiency of character or sentence structure. As a writer, I found much more to covet here than to ridicule. All in all, I think The Da Vinci Code is a new classic. Many people still discount the work, but I'm not sure how a true bibliophile could justify avoiding it. The book has become a phenomenon, an icon of modern success in the book industry. And, underneath it all, it really is a good story.

Half-way through i got...

Half-way through i got annoyed by the paper-thin characters and the endless fights and flights. I enjoyed the first half of it, though. Our two heroes - a man and a woman, both academics - try to reveal the truth about Maria Magdalen, who is supposed to have been much more important than the misogynist church wants us to believe. Their quest involves a lot of exciting puzzle-solving, and the context of a very old ideological battle gives some intellectual stimulation. However, the novel really lost me when a very unconvincing romance was injected. Still, i had a favourite character: the monk who is hunting down our heroes and who actually receives some background! Bad youth, saved by the monastery chief, therefore extremely loyal. Still, not such a good read.

This is the worst driv...

This is the worst drivel I have ever read. The author seems to know nothing about European geography or politics. His plot is ripped off from the delusions of someone else. Every time he throws in some little fact or snippet, it is wrong. Guaranteed wrong! He repeats urban legends without so much as a google search to verify their veracity, and tries to sell the grand plot as though there might be some truth in it! The author clearly sees himself in the role of the protaganist. He wants to think of himself as an academic, and his book as some kind of thesis. But the truth is that with the lack of critical thinking presented to us in this novel, Brown would not find himself so much as portering job in any respectable academic institution. Controversy sells. I read this book because someone said "with all the fuss about it there must be something in it". This book demonstrates ably the fallacy of that way of thinking. Despite all the fuss about this book, it really has no merit whatsoever. Possibly the worst book I ever read.

1/5. This paint-by-nu...

1/5. This paint-by-numbers "mystery" is an insult to the intelligence of all bipedal beings on this planet, and I'm including birds in this classification here. TDC is fine as a popcorn, rote, hackneyed, simplistic, tapioca beach book, but this is the worst book in modern memory (save perhaps Snow Falling on Cedars) to obtain such widespread reknown for being "literature." If Cold Mountain had actually been popular, it might be in a dead heat with TDC for this honor, but as it stands, TDC is the most overrated book in modern memory and a blight upon our popular culture. Hula hoops, pet rocks, and TDC. Here's your book synopsis: stock characters, 4-page chapters (each ending with a "cliffhanger"), Tickle-me-Elmo-level puzzle difficulty, some hokey mysticism, patriarchal nonsense, sexual repression, and link the whole thing to religion and you've got yourself a best seller. Personally, I think it's the 4-page chapters that did it. This is the beach book for the ADD generation. If you're going to get into the grail mythology, do yourself a favor and go for Foucalt's Pendulum before diving into this pabulum. If you're just in it for an easy read, it's a fine selection, but no different than the thousands lining supermarket shelves across the US.

Id like to go on reco...

I'd like to go on record as stating that the conspiracy theory underpinning this exceptionally boring novel neither interests, nor offends me: I do not object to this book on any moral or religious grounds. Nor do I consider the term "popular fiction" an example of invective: I am not a book snob and I relish a good pot-boiler. The alleged lineage of Christ and the book's positioning on the bestseller list are entirely irrelevant to the fact that The Da Vinci Code is earth-shatteringly, mind-numbingly dull. "Boring" appears a pallid and inadequate adjective when applied to this tepid and ponderous novel. I anticipated this novel eagerly: I was looking foward to a fun, no-brainer, page turner. What I found was a insipid imitation of the work of better thriller writers: a cliche ridden, interminable piece of tash that wound its way through a leaden plot, to a sluggish climax.

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Electrode, Comp-447757742, DC-prod-dfw8, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-30.0.0, SHA-4c05261de7b7524702d8d137579365498522abc0, CID-26bca458-43d-16df76e8443391, Generated: Wed, 23 Oct 2019 07:04:38 GMT