The Boy From the Burren: The First Book of the Painter (The Books of the Painter) (Volume 1)

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The Boy From the Burren: The First Book of the Painter (The Books of the Painter) (Volume 1)

Specifications

ISBN-13
9781611385069
ISBN-10
1611385067

Customer Reviews

5 stars
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5
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3
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1
1 star
1

Top mentions

Most helpful positive review
3 customers found this helpful
Really very good, desp...
Really very good, despite not quite being my usual fare. Fairly standard sort of pig-boy start, but the with the unusual inclusion of artistic ability, being a companion for a vocal storyteller. The setting is the west coast of County Claire in Ireland, in some pseudo Iron Age times. Metal work of any kind exists but is rare and precious. Most villagers live hard subsistence lives, hand to mouth in small tribes and clans. Religion and superstition rule widespread. Our hero Aengus lives with his drunken father, in a small village. The father works off his debts and villagers aren't too concerned. However when they visit a small local town, he is only saved from a savage beating by the intervention of Bruchan, who buys Aengus off him as an indentured servant for the wild tribes who follow the Wolf god. Bruchan is a storyteller too, and Aengus' native artistic talent starts to reveal his unexpected heritage. However it's a fierce time, and the factions within the Wolf clan lead to violence Aengus needs more than just paint to help his new family survive. I really enjoyed this. The setting of the dramatic broken lands and islands of the Burren was great. Some of the more mystic inclusions seem a bit odd. I don't knwo why the pirates have to be dwarves, nothing they do seems to add to their non-human status. The characters work well and the action fast paced but controlled. I'm always a little dubious about a pigboy start and some of the scenes with the interventionist gods were a little bit odd but generally the engaging writing made up for it. THere's a few distracting instances of foreshadowing, some of which seem to predict events that turn-up in later books (or not at all?) but generally well written. First of a trilogy it ends well enough on it's own, but distinctly leaves you wanting to read more to find out what happens.
Most helpful negative review
I couldnt finish this...
I couldn't finish this book. I have quite a few problems with it, so I will only talk about my three major issues here. 1) I did not like how it was written. I have a problem with fantasy and adventure books that are in first person. I feel that it takes a lot of the drama and excitement away from the events, especially when the character is telling the story after it has happened. Obviously they live or they wouldn't be telling this story. Unless they are telling it from the great beyond, in which case the book should be thrown across the room and then singed. (I do not condone burning books, but I will accept singeing them. Maybe a little spot on the corner.) I digress. The POV was my main concern on the writing, but not the only one. I wasn't a fan of the characters voice. There were many times when if felt inconsistent and his attempts at humor were forced. I also was not a fan of how the character would reflect on events in a way that would tear me out of the story and remind that this already happened. Like this section: "but now, as a healer myself, I will say honestly that if I had such a patient as Geri in the same circumstances, I could have done nothing for him." I don't want to hear the reflection, I want to see the growth that lead to him realizing this. I don't want to be told that his feelings changed. I want to see his feelings change. This sort of thing happens multiple times in the half that I read. 2) I got halfway through it and nothing exciting (at least to me) happened. Seriously, nothing happened. There were a few spots where there was a fight of some kind, but the character was never involved in the fight, so we don't actually get to see the fight occur. There was a part with a snake that was probably the most exciting thing that happened in the first half of the book and that was mostly him spending, apparently hours, moving very slowly toward a bucket so as not to startle the snake. (I won't tell what happens next since I try to make this a spoiler free blog but it's not much.) There is also a scene with pirate dwarves that goes nowhere. Yes, a scene with pirate dwarves was somehow boring. I know. I didn't think it was possible either. 3) The premise seemed a little boring and also a little unclear. So, I got halfway through the book and couldn't figure out why it was that being a painter was such a big deal or why Aengus was apparently a part of some prophecy. This wasn't explained in the whole first half of the book. From what I can tell, the painter is just the guy that stands behind the bard and creates a scene the depicts something from the story the bard is telling. Never was it explained why Aengus is more important than any other painter (other than a prophecy) or what this skill has to do with anything other than making cool pictures. Were his paintings somehow magical? Why is Aengus important? What exactly is the prophecy? There were so many questions that didn't seem like they were going to be answered anytime soon, and I wasn't willing to put in the time to figure it out. I feel like this had some potential in it, but there were areas that really should have been fixed and worked on that weren't. Sadly, I am not going to but this on any recommendation lists.
Most helpful positive review
3 customers found this helpful
Really very good, desp...
Really very good, despite not quite being my usual fare. Fairly standard sort of pig-boy start, but the with the unusual inclusion of artistic ability, being a companion for a vocal storyteller. The setting is the west coast of County Claire in Ireland, in some pseudo Iron Age times. Metal work of any kind exists but is rare and precious. Most villagers live hard subsistence lives, hand to mouth in small tribes and clans. Religion and superstition rule widespread. Our hero Aengus lives with his drunken father, in a small village. The father works off his debts and villagers aren't too concerned. However when they visit a small local town, he is only saved from a savage beating by the intervention of Bruchan, who buys Aengus off him as an indentured servant for the wild tribes who follow the Wolf god. Bruchan is a storyteller too, and Aengus' native artistic talent starts to reveal his unexpected heritage. However it's a fierce time, and the factions within the Wolf clan lead to violence Aengus needs more than just paint to help his new family survive. I really enjoyed this. The setting of the dramatic broken lands and islands of the Burren was great. Some of the more mystic inclusions seem a bit odd. I don't knwo why the pirates have to be dwarves, nothing they do seems to add to their non-human status. The characters work well and the action fast paced but controlled. I'm always a little dubious about a pigboy start and some of the scenes with the interventionist gods were a little bit odd but generally the engaging writing made up for it. THere's a few distracting instances of foreshadowing, some of which seem to predict events that turn-up in later books (or not at all?) but generally well written. First of a trilogy it ends well enough on it's own, but distinctly leaves you wanting to read more to find out what happens.
Most helpful negative review
I couldnt finish this...
I couldn't finish this book. I have quite a few problems with it, so I will only talk about my three major issues here. 1) I did not like how it was written. I have a problem with fantasy and adventure books that are in first person. I feel that it takes a lot of the drama and excitement away from the events, especially when the character is telling the story after it has happened. Obviously they live or they wouldn't be telling this story. Unless they are telling it from the great beyond, in which case the book should be thrown across the room and then singed. (I do not condone burning books, but I will accept singeing them. Maybe a little spot on the corner.) I digress. The POV was my main concern on the writing, but not the only one. I wasn't a fan of the characters voice. There were many times when if felt inconsistent and his attempts at humor were forced. I also was not a fan of how the character would reflect on events in a way that would tear me out of the story and remind that this already happened. Like this section: "but now, as a healer myself, I will say honestly that if I had such a patient as Geri in the same circumstances, I could have done nothing for him." I don't want to hear the reflection, I want to see the growth that lead to him realizing this. I don't want to be told that his feelings changed. I want to see his feelings change. This sort of thing happens multiple times in the half that I read. 2) I got halfway through it and nothing exciting (at least to me) happened. Seriously, nothing happened. There were a few spots where there was a fight of some kind, but the character was never involved in the fight, so we don't actually get to see the fight occur. There was a part with a snake that was probably the most exciting thing that happened in the first half of the book and that was mostly him spending, apparently hours, moving very slowly toward a bucket so as not to startle the snake. (I won't tell what happens next since I try to make this a spoiler free blog but it's not much.) There is also a scene with pirate dwarves that goes nowhere. Yes, a scene with pirate dwarves was somehow boring. I know. I didn't think it was possible either. 3) The premise seemed a little boring and also a little unclear. So, I got halfway through the book and couldn't figure out why it was that being a painter was such a big deal or why Aengus was apparently a part of some prophecy. This wasn't explained in the whole first half of the book. From what I can tell, the painter is just the guy that stands behind the bard and creates a scene the depicts something from the story the bard is telling. Never was it explained why Aengus is more important than any other painter (other than a prophecy) or what this skill has to do with anything other than making cool pictures. Were his paintings somehow magical? Why is Aengus important? What exactly is the prophecy? There were so many questions that didn't seem like they were going to be answered anytime soon, and I wasn't willing to put in the time to figure it out. I feel like this had some potential in it, but there were areas that really should have been fixed and worked on that weren't. Sadly, I am not going to but this on any recommendation lists.
1-5 of 13 reviews

Really very good, desp...

Really very good, despite not quite being my usual fare. Fairly standard sort of pig-boy start, but the with the unusual inclusion of artistic ability, being a companion for a vocal storyteller. The setting is the west coast of County Claire in Ireland, in some pseudo Iron Age times. Metal work of any kind exists but is rare and precious. Most villagers live hard subsistence lives, hand to mouth in small tribes and clans. Religion and superstition rule widespread. Our hero Aengus lives with his drunken father, in a small village. The father works off his debts and villagers aren't too concerned. However when they visit a small local town, he is only saved from a savage beating by the intervention of Bruchan, who buys Aengus off him as an indentured servant for the wild tribes who follow the Wolf god. Bruchan is a storyteller too, and Aengus' native artistic talent starts to reveal his unexpected heritage. However it's a fierce time, and the factions within the Wolf clan lead to violence Aengus needs more than just paint to help his new family survive. I really enjoyed this. The setting of the dramatic broken lands and islands of the Burren was great. Some of the more mystic inclusions seem a bit odd. I don't knwo why the pirates have to be dwarves, nothing they do seems to add to their non-human status. The characters work well and the action fast paced but controlled. I'm always a little dubious about a pigboy start and some of the scenes with the interventionist gods were a little bit odd but generally the engaging writing made up for it. THere's a few distracting instances of foreshadowing, some of which seem to predict events that turn-up in later books (or not at all?) but generally well written. First of a trilogy it ends well enough on it's own, but distinctly leaves you wanting to read more to find out what happens.

This story starts with...

This story starts with Aengus being bought by a storyteller from his drunkard of a father after the storyteller notices his talents for painting with sand. He is brought to a secluded society that live on an island, introduced to the villain, learns new skills including painting and learns he may be part of a prophecy of the return of the gods & goddesses. I enjoyed reading this story. It is a classic fantasy tale that moves a bit slowly at times. I am hoping to find the next book in the series.

The Boy From the Burre...

The Boy From the Burren: The First Book of the Painter (The Book of the Painter #1) by Sheila Gilluly To be completely honest I would have loved more back story or description or something in this book. I really liked the idea and play out of the whole story but I feel I got lost a bit in the middle. The beginning and ending had me not wanting to put the book down at all and parts throughout but some areas were a little fuzzy for me. Also I am kind of wondering about the painting and how it was done (I am going to look this up, very interesting to me). I had a hard time picturing a story teller with a painter when I'm not sure how the painting is done on the ground and still have an audience be able to see the painting unless they are elevated and the painter below them. Still I loved the book! And look forward to reading more about The Painter.

I really enjoyed this ...

I really enjoyed this book. I am, however, disappointed to find out it is first in a series and difficult to find the remaining books. The story read well and the characters were interesting. I want to know more about what happens next. While it follows the format of build up, climax and anticlimax, the story is not ended, IMHO, and without the remaining books available (even if as some reviews state not that good), I feel it is incomplete.

I really enjoyed this ...

I really enjoyed this book! The storyline and characters kept me engaged and it was one of those books where I felt pulled into the story, and I couldn't stop reading! I can't wait to see what happens in the remaining stories! **i received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review**

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