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Sycamore Row

Walmart # 559097418
$12.23$12.23
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<b><i>John Grisham takes you back to where it all began . . .</i></b> <p></p> John Grisham's <i>A Time to Kill</i> is one of the most popular novels of our time. Now we return to that famous courthouse in Clanton as Jake Brigance once again finds himself embroiled in a fiercely controversial trial-a trial that will expose old racial tensions and force Ford County to confront its tortured history. <p></p> Seth Hubbard is a wealthy man dying of lung cancer. He trusts no one. Before he hangs himself from a sycamore tree, Hubbard leaves a new, handwritten, will. It is an act that drags his adult children, his black maid, and Jake into a conflict as riveting and dramatic as the murder trial that made Brigance one of Ford County's most notorious citizens, just three years earlier. <p></p> The second will raises far more questions than it answers. Why would Hubbard leave nearly all of his fortune to his maid? Had chemotherapy and painkillers affected his ability to think clearly? And what does it all have to do with a piece of land once known as Sycamore Row? <p></p> In <i>Sycamore Row</i>, John Grisham returns to the setting and the compelling characters that first established him as America's favorite storyteller. Here, in his most assured and thrilling novel yet, is a powerful testament to the fact that Grisham remains the master of the legal thriller, nearly twenty-five years after the publication of <i>A Time to Kill</i>.

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John Grisham takes you back to where it all began . . .

John Grisham's A Time to Kill is one of the most popular novels of our time. Now we return to that famous courthouse in Clanton as Jake Brigance once again finds himself embroiled in a fiercely controversial trial-a trial that will expose old racial tensions and force Ford County to confront its tortured history.

Seth Hubbard is a wealthy man dying of lung cancer. He trusts no one. Before he hangs himself from a sycamore tree, Hubbard leaves a new, handwritten, will. It is an act that drags his adult children, his black maid, and Jake into a conflict as riveting and dramatic as the murder trial that made Brigance one of Ford County's most notorious citizens, just three years earlier.

The second will raises far more questions than it answers. Why would Hubbard leave nearly all of his fortune to his maid? Had chemotherapy and painkillers affected his ability to think clearly? And what does it all have to do with a piece of land once known as Sycamore Row?

In Sycamore Row, John Grisham returns to the setting and the compelling characters that first established him as America's favorite storyteller. Here, in his most assured and thrilling novel yet, is a powerful testament to the fact that Grisham remains the master of the legal thriller, nearly twenty-five years after the publication of A Time to Kill. John Grisham takes you back to where it all began . . .

John Grisham's A Time to Kill is one of the most popular novels of our time. Now we return to that famous courthouse in Clanton as Jake Brigance once again finds himself embroiled in a fiercely controversial trial-a trial that will expose old racial tensions and force Ford County to confront its tortured history.

Seth Hubbard is a wealthy man dying of lung cancer. He trusts no one. Before he hangs himself from a sycamore tree, Hubbard leaves a new, handwritten, will. It is an act that drags his adult children, his black maid, and Jake into a conflict as riveting and dramatic as the murder trial that made Brigance one of Ford County's most notorious citizens, just three years earlier.

The second will raises far more questions than it answers. Why would Hubbard leave nearly all of his fortune to his maid? Had chemotherapy and painkillers affected his ability to think clearly? And what does it all have to do with a piece of land once known as Sycamore Row?

In Sycamore Row, John Grisham returns to the setting and the compelling characters that first established him as America's favorite storyteller. Here, in his most assured and thrilling novel yet, is a powerful testament to the fact that Grisham remains the master of the legal thriller, nearly twenty-five years after the publication of A Time to Kill.

Specifications

Abridged
Y
Series Title
Jake Brigance
Publisher
Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group
Book Format
Other
Original Languages
English
Author
John Grisham
ISBN-13
9780553545258
Publication Date
August, 2014
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
5.86 x 5.11 x 1.13 Inches
ISBN-10
0553545256

Customer Reviews

5 stars
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4 stars
20
3 stars
6
2 stars
1
1 star
0

Top mentions

Most helpful positive review
1 customers found this helpful
5158. Sycamore Row, by...
5158. Sycamore Row, by John Grisham (read 4 May 2014) (Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction in 2014) This is the 22nd book of John Grisham's I've read. Of those I have given 5 only one star. I am often dismayed by things about his books. This book did have disturbing things in it. I was bothered by the blatant behavior of the judge in talking to the lawyer ex parte. I know this is often done in the real world but it is especially annoying when presented as if the judge was doing the right thing in helping the lawyer unethically. As I was once told by a lawyer, in his district not talking to the judge behind the back of opposing counsel would be legal malpractice. But it should be deplored since it is unethical and indefensible. There are other things in this book which are very unlikely, and some of the book, even to a lawyer, was boring. But the last part of the book is highly engaging and I confess I was eager to keep reading to see what would happen as Jake Brigance (the hero of Grisham's great book, A Time to Kill,) is defending a holographic will written by a guy who committed suicide the day after he wrote his will. A lot of the legal happenings are realistic and accurate, though I was surprised by the way strikes were exercised in picking the jury--but maybe that is how a jury is picked in Mississippi--I don't know. Pretty clearly the verdict in the case would not have stood up on appeal, as the judge well knew. But the book is clearly one of the better books Grisham has written and I enjoyed reading it very much.
Most helpful negative review
1 customers found this helpful
I could get away with ...
I could get away with reading the first and last chapters, everything else a cacophony of attorney bickering, race stereotyping and jury melodrama; many references to Time to Kill, risks a repetitive and tired formula.
Most helpful positive review
1 customers found this helpful
5158. Sycamore Row, by...
5158. Sycamore Row, by John Grisham (read 4 May 2014) (Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction in 2014) This is the 22nd book of John Grisham's I've read. Of those I have given 5 only one star. I am often dismayed by things about his books. This book did have disturbing things in it. I was bothered by the blatant behavior of the judge in talking to the lawyer ex parte. I know this is often done in the real world but it is especially annoying when presented as if the judge was doing the right thing in helping the lawyer unethically. As I was once told by a lawyer, in his district not talking to the judge behind the back of opposing counsel would be legal malpractice. But it should be deplored since it is unethical and indefensible. There are other things in this book which are very unlikely, and some of the book, even to a lawyer, was boring. But the last part of the book is highly engaging and I confess I was eager to keep reading to see what would happen as Jake Brigance (the hero of Grisham's great book, A Time to Kill,) is defending a holographic will written by a guy who committed suicide the day after he wrote his will. A lot of the legal happenings are realistic and accurate, though I was surprised by the way strikes were exercised in picking the jury--but maybe that is how a jury is picked in Mississippi--I don't know. Pretty clearly the verdict in the case would not have stood up on appeal, as the judge well knew. But the book is clearly one of the better books Grisham has written and I enjoyed reading it very much.
Most helpful negative review
1 customers found this helpful
I could get away with ...
I could get away with reading the first and last chapters, everything else a cacophony of attorney bickering, race stereotyping and jury melodrama; many references to Time to Kill, risks a repetitive and tired formula.
1-5 of 34 reviews

5158. Sycamore Row, by...

5158. Sycamore Row, by John Grisham (read 4 May 2014) (Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction in 2014) This is the 22nd book of John Grisham's I've read. Of those I have given 5 only one star. I am often dismayed by things about his books. This book did have disturbing things in it. I was bothered by the blatant behavior of the judge in talking to the lawyer ex parte. I know this is often done in the real world but it is especially annoying when presented as if the judge was doing the right thing in helping the lawyer unethically. As I was once told by a lawyer, in his district not talking to the judge behind the back of opposing counsel would be legal malpractice. But it should be deplored since it is unethical and indefensible. There are other things in this book which are very unlikely, and some of the book, even to a lawyer, was boring. But the last part of the book is highly engaging and I confess I was eager to keep reading to see what would happen as Jake Brigance (the hero of Grisham's great book, A Time to Kill,) is defending a holographic will written by a guy who committed suicide the day after he wrote his will. A lot of the legal happenings are realistic and accurate, though I was surprised by the way strikes were exercised in picking the jury--but maybe that is how a jury is picked in Mississippi--I don't know. Pretty clearly the verdict in the case would not have stood up on appeal, as the judge well knew. But the book is clearly one of the better books Grisham has written and I enjoyed reading it very much.

It had been a long tim...

It had been a long time since I read a Grisham book that I really enjoyed and after reading Sycamore Row, I remembered what I liked about his books - deep and heavy storylines told in an easy, straightforward manner with likeable characters with just enough detail to keep things interesting but, not enough that you get bogged down in it. Sycamore Row brings back this style seen in Mr. Grisham's earlier books.

This book picks up thr...

This book picks up three years after the events of 'A Time To Kill' and Jake Brigance is still struggling as a small town lawyer. He recieves a hand-written will in the post of a man who killed himself the day before. The will cuts out the family and leaves most of the vast fortune to the black maid.I really enjoyed this book and in some ways more than the first book as it deals with the legal ramifications of Seth Hubbard's estate. Why did he leave a huge sum to someone not related and dis-inherit his family, could his missing brother be of help.Small town America doesn't come out well here and I hope that things have changed for the better since the time peiod this was set. The racist attitudes of many were of concern, such as the belief that just because the maid was black meant she shouldn't get the money!The legal system is strange for a British reader but no less compelling for that.I would enjoy more books with Jake Brigance and his family to see how he develops as a lawyer.

I really enjoyed this ...

I really enjoyed this book. It was a little long and had elements and characters ( like Booker Sistrunk) that I felt were totally irrelevant, but all in all it was a good read. I enjoyed all the courtroom maneuvering. Funny, I could still see Matthew M. as Jake and Donald Sutherland as Julian.

John Grishams Sycamor...

John Grisham's Sycamore Row is an engaging thriller with a small town Southern lawyer (actually quite of few of them)fighting to have a handwritten will accepted as the last will and testament of reclusive Seth Hubbard. Jake Brigance is the young attorney with his second jury trail where race is an issue. Set in Mississippi in the late 1980's, Hubbard's black housekeeper, Lettie Lang, becomes the sole beneficiary after his suicide. The handwritten will cuts out the children and grand children of Hubbard. the big question is why Hubbard would do such a thing. This novel has stories within stories, along with hidden truths and lost truths which ultimately come to light. The detail is exquisite, the characters alive and the story a page turner, making Sycamore Row one you'll want to read.

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Electrode, Comp-283025157, DC-prod-dfw7, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-33.2.1, SHA-a03a4c0c4c33ea37a9a99b6bc3a2c138ada7472a, CID-02f03106-ab5-17126ff2fc95bd, Generated: Sun, 29 Mar 2020 15:53:10 GMT