As Sibelius is to Finland, as Copland and Ives are to America, Heitor Villa-Lobos is to Brazil. While Villa- Lobos seems best known for his works inspired by Brazil's cultural melting-pot, his symphonic works seem to have got lost in the shuffle.
Perhaps this release, the world premier recording of his Symphony No. 10 "Amerindia," will go towards changing that. This is a dense, ambitious (though certainly not "difficult") work in which Villa-Lobos integrates the essence of Brazil's diversity with the modern European language of the symphony and the oratorio. For its vocal substance, this piece requires, in addition to vocal soloists, choirs singing in three languages: Latin, Portuguese and the indigenous Tupi. There are startling changes in tempi throughout, and a grandiose (in the best sense) approach-the score requires a large orchestra including piano, organ, harp and lots of percussion.
At many points, "Amerindia" recalls the majestic scope of Mahler's Symphony No. 8 "Symphony Of A Thousand." Yet there is nothing ponderous or unwieldy about this music-Villa-Lobos conveys a fervent yet joyous nationalistic passion, and he does so with the expressions of the European tradition conjoined with the rich cultural history of his homeland. All this is brought to vibrant life by the sympathetic baton of Gisele Ben-Dor, whose South American background gives her a fine rapport to the music.

As Sibelius is to Finland, as Copland and Ives are to America, Heitor Villa-Lobos is to Brazil. While Villa- Lobos seems best known for his works inspired by Brazil's cultural melting-pot, his symphonic works seem to have got lost in the shuffle.
Perhaps this release, the world premier recording of his Symphony No. 10 "Amerindia," will go towards changing that. This is a dense, ambitious (though certainly not "difficult") work in which Villa-Lobos integrates the essence of Brazil's diversity with the modern European language of the symphony and the oratorio. For its vocal substance, this piece requires, in addition to vocal soloists, choirs singing in three languages: Latin, Portuguese and the indigenous Tupi. There are startling changes in tempi throughout, and a grandiose (in the best sense) approach-the score requires a large orchestra including piano, organ, harp and lots of percussion.
At many points, "Amerindia" recalls the majestic scope of Mahler's Symphony No. 8 "Symphony Of A Thousand." Yet there is nothing ponderous or unwieldy about this music-Villa-Lobos conveys a fervent yet joyous nationalistic passion, and he does so with the expressions of the European tradition conjoined with the rich cultural history of his homeland. All this is brought to vibrant life by the sympathetic baton of Gisele Ben-Dor, whose South American background gives her a fine rapport to the music.

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As Sibelius is to Finland, as Copland and Ives are to America, Heitor Villa-Lobos is to Brazil. While Villa- Lobos seems best known for his works inspired by Brazil's cultural melting-pot, his symphonic works seem to have got lost in the shuffle.Perhaps this release, the world
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