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Electrode, Comp-814103540, DC-prod-az-southcentralus-18, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-19.1.31, SHA-771c9ce79737366b1d5f53d21cad4086bf722e21, CID-26722884-4ef-16e91590705e7b, Generated: Fri, 22 Nov 2019 04:22:41 GMT

Sebastian - eBook

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<p><strong>The <em>New York Times</em> bestselling author of the Novels of the Others invites you enter the realm of Ephemera, a place that is ever-changing, caught between the Light and Dark forces of the heart...</strong></p> <p>Long ago, Ephemera was split into a dizzying number of magical lands—connected only by bridges that may take you where you truly belong, rather than where you had intended to go. In one such land, where night reigns and demons dwell, the half-incubus Sebastian revels in dark delights. But in dreams she calls to him: a woman who wants only to be safe and loved—a woman he hungers for while knowing he may destroy her. And an even more devastating destiny awaits him, for an ancient evil is stirring—and Sebastian’s realm may be the first to fall...</p> <p><strong>“Erotic, fervently romantic, [and] superbly entertaining.”—<em>Booklist</em></strong></p>

Customer Review Snapshot

3.8 out of 5 stars
23 total reviews
5 stars
7
4 stars
7
3 stars
8
2 stars
0
1 star
1
Most helpful positive review
Sebastian takes place in Ephemera, a world affected--literally--by human emotions. To keep things somewhat stable, there are Landscapers who shape the landscape and Bridges, who connect them. And there are wizards and demons and incubi and succubi. The eponymous Sebastian is a half-incubus. Rejected as a child by his wizard father and by other children because of his heritage, he nonetheless experienced love and acceptance during the periods when his father allowed him to stay with his aunt and cousins. Now he lives in a landscape created by ultra-powerful rogue Landscaper Belladonna called the Den of Iniquity with others of his kind and, surprisingly, a pure and innocent young woman, Lynnea, with whom he's falling in love. But the Eater of the World has escaped and is threatening all of Ephemera, and it's up to Sebastian and Belladonna to save the world. The entire story is like a fable, the moral of which is the need for balance. Sebastian's history is one of love balanced by rejection--necessary to mold his character. The Den of Iniquity is just as necessary to Ephemera as Sanctuary, its opposite. Landscapers learn early on that all emotions, not just positive ones, are required to form a stable landscape. Balance is the goal of the characters in the story, even if they don't know it--it's what they need to be whole, complete, and happy. Or put another way, it's about shades of gray. Sebastian and Belladonna are dark heroes, but despite their supernatural abilities, they're dark in a human and understandable way. This is a much lighter book than Bishop's Black Jewels trilogy, which is not to say it's a lesser book, but it's definitely different--and because expectations affect enjoyment so much, don't expect a reprise of Daemon and Jaenelle here. Kudos to Bishop for that, by the way: she wrote an excellent dark fantasy series, and now she's writing something else. I have the next book on my to-buy list. I'm looking forward to it.

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The New York Times bestselling author of the Novels of the Others invites you enter the realm of Ephemera, a place that is ever-changing, caught between the Light and Dark forces of the heart...

Long ago, Ephemera was split into a dizzying number of magical lands—connected only by bridges that may take you where you truly belong, rather than where you had intended to go. In one such land, where night reigns and demons dwell, the half-incubus Sebastian revels in dark delights. But in dreams she calls to him: a woman who wants only to be safe and loved—a woman he hungers for while knowing he may destroy her. And an even more devastating destiny awaits him, for an ancient evil is stirring—and Sebastian’s realm may be the first to fall...

“Erotic, fervently romantic, [and] superbly entertaining.”—Booklist

Sebastian - eBook

Specifications

Read This On
Android,Ereader,Desktop,IOS,Windows
Is Downloadable Content Available
Y
Digital Reader Format
Epub (Yes)
Language
en
Series Title
Ephemera
Publisher
Penguin Publishing Group
Author
Anne Bishop
ISBN-13
9781101219584
ISBN-10
1101219580

Customer Reviews

5 stars
7
4 stars
7
3 stars
8
2 stars
0
1 star
1
Most helpful positive review
1 customers found this helpful
Sebastian takes place ...
Sebastian takes place in Ephemera, a world affected--literally--by human emotions. To keep things somewhat stable, there are Landscapers who shape the landscape and Bridges, who connect them. And there are wizards and demons and incubi and succubi. The eponymous Sebastian is a half-incubus. Rejected as a child by his wizard father and by other children because of his heritage, he nonetheless experienced love and acceptance during the periods when his father allowed him to stay with his aunt and cousins. Now he lives in a landscape created by ultra-powerful rogue Landscaper Belladonna called the Den of Iniquity with others of his kind and, surprisingly, a pure and innocent young woman, Lynnea, with whom he's falling in love. But the Eater of the World has escaped and is threatening all of Ephemera, and it's up to Sebastian and Belladonna to save the world. The entire story is like a fable, the moral of which is the need for balance. Sebastian's history is one of love balanced by rejection--necessary to mold his character. The Den of Iniquity is just as necessary to Ephemera as Sanctuary, its opposite. Landscapers learn early on that all emotions, not just positive ones, are required to form a stable landscape. Balance is the goal of the characters in the story, even if they don't know it--it's what they need to be whole, complete, and happy. Or put another way, it's about shades of gray. Sebastian and Belladonna are dark heroes, but despite their supernatural abilities, they're dark in a human and understandable way. This is a much lighter book than Bishop's Black Jewels trilogy, which is not to say it's a lesser book, but it's definitely different--and because expectations affect enjoyment so much, don't expect a reprise of Daemon and Jaenelle here. Kudos to Bishop for that, by the way: she wrote an excellent dark fantasy series, and now she's writing something else. I have the next book on my to-buy list. I'm looking forward to it.
Most helpful negative review
This was really terrib...
This was really terrible. Anne Bishop is known for writing id-fulfillment in fantasy novels, complete with as many abused Mary Sues as possible. I expected lots of fluffy titilation with very little substance (no real plot or cohesive world building, I mean), but I was annoyed at how boring and dull the would-be-titilation was. Sebastion is an incubus living in a world created specifically to cater to "dark desires", and yet all he does is have bland sex with women. No kinks, no gender-play, certainly nothing homoerotic (dammit)--the most depraved thing he does is eat cheesy bread shaped like sexual organs. The Den of Iniquity is supposedly terribly shameless and lascivious, yet all that apparently happens there is lame het sex. A single murder sends all the residents into a tizzy. And no one worries about money! Everything is provided by Gloriana Belladonna, a beautiful, abused-as-a-child enchantress. (Note: In Anne Bishop stories, *everyone* is abused as a child.) There's no tension or grit to this book. Even the big terrible monster is A)not scary in the least and B)clearly going to lose, undoubtedly due to some deus ex machina. Ugh.
Most helpful positive review
1 customers found this helpful
Sebastian takes place ...
Sebastian takes place in Ephemera, a world affected--literally--by human emotions. To keep things somewhat stable, there are Landscapers who shape the landscape and Bridges, who connect them. And there are wizards and demons and incubi and succubi. The eponymous Sebastian is a half-incubus. Rejected as a child by his wizard father and by other children because of his heritage, he nonetheless experienced love and acceptance during the periods when his father allowed him to stay with his aunt and cousins. Now he lives in a landscape created by ultra-powerful rogue Landscaper Belladonna called the Den of Iniquity with others of his kind and, surprisingly, a pure and innocent young woman, Lynnea, with whom he's falling in love. But the Eater of the World has escaped and is threatening all of Ephemera, and it's up to Sebastian and Belladonna to save the world. The entire story is like a fable, the moral of which is the need for balance. Sebastian's history is one of love balanced by rejection--necessary to mold his character. The Den of Iniquity is just as necessary to Ephemera as Sanctuary, its opposite. Landscapers learn early on that all emotions, not just positive ones, are required to form a stable landscape. Balance is the goal of the characters in the story, even if they don't know it--it's what they need to be whole, complete, and happy. Or put another way, it's about shades of gray. Sebastian and Belladonna are dark heroes, but despite their supernatural abilities, they're dark in a human and understandable way. This is a much lighter book than Bishop's Black Jewels trilogy, which is not to say it's a lesser book, but it's definitely different--and because expectations affect enjoyment so much, don't expect a reprise of Daemon and Jaenelle here. Kudos to Bishop for that, by the way: she wrote an excellent dark fantasy series, and now she's writing something else. I have the next book on my to-buy list. I'm looking forward to it.
Most helpful negative review
This was really terrib...
This was really terrible. Anne Bishop is known for writing id-fulfillment in fantasy novels, complete with as many abused Mary Sues as possible. I expected lots of fluffy titilation with very little substance (no real plot or cohesive world building, I mean), but I was annoyed at how boring and dull the would-be-titilation was. Sebastion is an incubus living in a world created specifically to cater to "dark desires", and yet all he does is have bland sex with women. No kinks, no gender-play, certainly nothing homoerotic (dammit)--the most depraved thing he does is eat cheesy bread shaped like sexual organs. The Den of Iniquity is supposedly terribly shameless and lascivious, yet all that apparently happens there is lame het sex. A single murder sends all the residents into a tizzy. And no one worries about money! Everything is provided by Gloriana Belladonna, a beautiful, abused-as-a-child enchantress. (Note: In Anne Bishop stories, *everyone* is abused as a child.) There's no tension or grit to this book. Even the big terrible monster is A)not scary in the least and B)clearly going to lose, undoubtedly due to some deus ex machina. Ugh.
1-5 of 23 reviews

Sebastian takes place ...

Sebastian takes place in Ephemera, a world affected--literally--by human emotions. To keep things somewhat stable, there are Landscapers who shape the landscape and Bridges, who connect them. And there are wizards and demons and incubi and succubi. The eponymous Sebastian is a half-incubus. Rejected as a child by his wizard father and by other children because of his heritage, he nonetheless experienced love and acceptance during the periods when his father allowed him to stay with his aunt and cousins. Now he lives in a landscape created by ultra-powerful rogue Landscaper Belladonna called the Den of Iniquity with others of his kind and, surprisingly, a pure and innocent young woman, Lynnea, with whom he's falling in love. But the Eater of the World has escaped and is threatening all of Ephemera, and it's up to Sebastian and Belladonna to save the world. The entire story is like a fable, the moral of which is the need for balance. Sebastian's history is one of love balanced by rejection--necessary to mold his character. The Den of Iniquity is just as necessary to Ephemera as Sanctuary, its opposite. Landscapers learn early on that all emotions, not just positive ones, are required to form a stable landscape. Balance is the goal of the characters in the story, even if they don't know it--it's what they need to be whole, complete, and happy. Or put another way, it's about shades of gray. Sebastian and Belladonna are dark heroes, but despite their supernatural abilities, they're dark in a human and understandable way. This is a much lighter book than Bishop's Black Jewels trilogy, which is not to say it's a lesser book, but it's definitely different--and because expectations affect enjoyment so much, don't expect a reprise of Daemon and Jaenelle here. Kudos to Bishop for that, by the way: she wrote an excellent dark fantasy series, and now she's writing something else. I have the next book on my to-buy list. I'm looking forward to it.

Sebastian is an incubu...

Sebastian is an incubus who lives in the aptly named Den of Inquity, which is located in the landscapes of Ephemera. I really enjoyed this book about Sebastian and his love interest Linnea. I did find it amusing that there was little sex in a book about an Incubus.

This is the second tim...

This is the second time I've read this book, and I did so in preparation of reading Belladonna (which I will read next). The first time I read this book, I thought it was fantastic. This is the book that introduced me to Anne Bishop, and after reading it my husband and I went out and bought all of her novels. Upon reading it a second time, I'm not quite as enamored with it, though I still think it's good. Things I liked about it include: the magic system as a whole. The idea of all these different lands that have changed locations but are still somehow in the same world, yet things can be made...it's all so complex and twisted and I love it. The Den of Iniquity and its relationship to Sebastian. The familial relationships in their family are well-done and realistic. The people are well-written. The world itself is alive and rich. One of the things I didn't like, however, was the detail of the magic system. I know that partially that's because those who practice the magic don't themselves really know what they're doing, since all that knowledge was lost years ago. Also, this book is from Sebastian's point of view, rather than Belladonna's or someone else who knows better what they're doing. But I still get this vibe that not even Bishop really understands exactly how the magic system actually works. It's almost as though this is a freshman attempt at writing a fantasy/another novel with a magic system, which I know isn't true. Again, I recognize that a good part of the reason for this feeling is that no one truly understands what they're doing and why, but it still bothers me. Despite that nagging me, I still really like this book. I don't think it's her best-written (I think the Black Jewels trilogy is better), but I think it's very solid, and fans and newcomers alike will like it. There are many things I love about this novel. The world setting is

Ephemera is a world th...

Ephemera is a world that is ever changing and yet constant as well. Constant in it's will to bring about the joining of those hearts that belong together and ever-changing in its presence, it is broken into hundreds of pieces connected by bridges and hearts. Sebastian himself is half incubus although he believes he is more human than demon and after reading the book I can't help but agree to that statement, he doesn't do anything that could be classified as truly bad or too terribly erotic, it's all vanilla but still amazing. Lynnea is a catalyst, changing the world with her very presence, changing Sebastian with her wish to be loved. Glorianna Belladonna is a game changer, filled with both the Light and Darkness that threads through this ever-changing world, a Landscaper who can bend the world to her will or is bent by the world to its own agenda. This book was worth the read, definitely. The world created by the author is both beautiful and dark, I believe it drew me right on in and invited me to stay.

Anne Bishop introduces...

Anne Bishop introduces a compelling story and strong characters in this first novel of a trilogy. Having read and enjoyed Bishop's Black Jewels novels, I recognized many similar elements and characterizations in this novel. A fun read that I eagerly devoured and I can't wait to delve into the rest!

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Electrode, Comp-812496349, DC-prod-az-southcentralus-13, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-30.0.3-ebf-2, SHA-8c8e8dc1c07e462c80c1b82096c2da2858100078, CID-cec4b814-920-16e9166a8e958d, Generated: Fri, 22 Nov 2019 04:37:34 GMT