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Princess, More Tears to Cry - eBook

Princess, More Tears to Cry - eBook

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When Jean Sasson's book Princess: Life Behind the Veil in Saudi Arabia was published, it became an immediate international bestseller. It sold to 43 countries and spent 13 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list. Now, in this long-awaited, compelling new book, Sasson and Princess Sultana return to tell the world what it means to be a Saudi woman today. <br /> <br />Through advances in education and with access to work, Saudi women are breaking through barriers; they are becoming doctors, social workers, business owners. Major steps forward have been made. But this is not the whole story. Sadly, despite changes in the law, women are still subjected to terrible suppression, abuse and crimes of psychological and physical violence. For many, the struggle for basic human rights continues. <br /> <br />PRINCESS, MORE TEARS TO CRY reveals the intimate struggles of Saudi women inside one of the richest, most conservative kingdoms in the world. These are stories of triumph and heartbreak amongst the highest- and lowest-born. Princess Sultana speaks frankly about her strong-willed daughters, her beloved husband and the contentious Al-Saud family whose daily battles about what it means to be a woman in Saudi Arabia mirror those of the society at large. PRINCESS, MORE TEARS TO CRY is an unforgettable journey into the hearts and minds of Saudi women, and will be forever etched into the memory of readers. <br /> <br />PRAISE FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER PRINCESS: <br /> <br /> &quot;Absolutely riveting and profoundly sad...&quot; --People magazine <br /> <br />&quot;A chilling story...a vivid account of an air-conditioned nightmare...&quot; --Entertainment Weekly <br /> <br />&quot;Must-reading for anyone interested in human rights.&quot; --USA Today <br /> <br />&quot;Shocking...candid...sad, sobering, and compassionate...&quot; --San Francisco Chronicle

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When Jean Sasson's book Princess: Life Behind the Veil in Saudi Arabia was published, it became an immediate international bestseller. It sold to 43 countries and spent 13 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list. Now, in this long-awaited, compelling new book, Sasson and Princess Sultana return to tell the world what it means to be a Saudi woman today.

Through advances in education and with access to work, Saudi women are breaking through barriers; they are becoming doctors, social workers, business owners. Major steps forward have been made. But this is not the whole story. Sadly, despite changes in the law, women are still subjected to terrible suppression, abuse and crimes of psychological and physical violence. For many, the struggle for basic human rights continues.

PRINCESS, MORE TEARS TO CRY reveals the intimate struggles of Saudi women inside one of the richest, most conservative kingdoms in the world. These are stories of triumph and heartbreak amongst the highest- and lowest-born. Princess Sultana speaks frankly about her strong-willed daughters, her beloved husband and the contentious Al-Saud family whose daily battles about what it means to be a woman in Saudi Arabia mirror those of the society at large. PRINCESS, MORE TEARS TO CRY is an unforgettable journey into the hearts and minds of Saudi women, and will be forever etched into the memory of readers.

PRAISE FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER PRINCESS:

"Absolutely riveting and profoundly sad..." --People magazine

"A chilling story...a vivid account of an air-conditioned nightmare..." --Entertainment Weekly

"Must-reading for anyone interested in human rights." --USA Today

"Shocking...candid...sad, sobering, and compassionate..." --San Francisco Chronicle Princess, More Tears to Cry - eBook

Specifications

Read This On
Android,Ereader,Desktop,IOS,Windows
Is Downloadable Content Available
Y
Digital Reader Format
Epub (Yes)
Language
en
Publisher
Kobo
Author
Jean Sasson
ISBN-13
9781939481269
ISBN-10
1939481260
Customer Reviews
4.4
18 reviews
5 stars
12
4 stars
3
3 stars
2
2 stars
1
1 star
0
Top Positive Review
2 customers found this helpful
Princess by Jean Sasson i
Princess by Jean Sasson is the purported true story of a Saudi princess and what her life entails. I say purported as the princess' identity is never revealed and there have been questions as to whether she actually exists. I am one of the suspicious as I found parts of this book did not ring true. I believe all the events described probably did happen, but not necessarily to one woman. What I don't question is the authenticity of the general life details that are described. This is a country that holds well over half their population as valueless, and the Saudi women's lack of rights is a disgrace. As a North American woman it is hard to believe, much less read about the degree of control that men hold, the brutality that is commonplace and accepted, the laws that treat women as a possession, and the outdated systems that are kept in place for the sole purpose of keeping women in their place. I do realize that this book takes place before the 1990's and some changes have occured since that time, but in recent years the Arab countries have swung back to a very traditional viewpoint. An eye opening read and a frustrating look at a archaic system that should be changed but sadly probably won't. In this country of immense wealth, the men have the power and appear to have not intention of allowing their women to step out of their shadow existence. When government, religion and tradition are set so solidly in one direction, it would be incredibly difficult or even impossible to change.
Top Negative Review
I honestly am baffled as
I honestly am baffled as to why this book has such rave reviews. Sultana is supposed to be a bastion of feminine change in Saudi Arabia (and lest you forget, she will remind you every two or three pages), but she does little to actually, you know, change anything aside from mouth off to her brother every once in a while. The book is also full of contradictions that show that Sultana is still, at the time of writing/dictating the book, deeply immersed in the "mindset" of her country. In location 900 (I'm on a Kindle) she says, "...there are many classes of people in my land, from those various levels of the wealthy Royal Family down to that of lowly salaried workers. But no one, including foreign workers, is without the basic necessities of life. Our government ensures the well-being of all Saudis. Each male citizen is assured of a home, health care....Our female citizens are provided for by the men of their families..." Loc 1019 states that the "poorest Bedouins" have to live in tents and imply they have trouble feeding their families. Sultana is also guilty of stereotyping against other races, as shown by this unprompted comment: "unsmiling German contractors" [loc 1704]
Top Positive Review
2 customers found this helpful
Princess by Jean Sasson i
Princess by Jean Sasson is the purported true story of a Saudi princess and what her life entails. I say purported as the princess' identity is never revealed and there have been questions as to whether she actually exists. I am one of the suspicious as I found parts of this book did not ring true. I believe all the events described probably did happen, but not necessarily to one woman. What I don't question is the authenticity of the general life details that are described. This is a country that holds well over half their population as valueless, and the Saudi women's lack of rights is a disgrace. As a North American woman it is hard to believe, much less read about the degree of control that men hold, the brutality that is commonplace and accepted, the laws that treat women as a possession, and the outdated systems that are kept in place for the sole purpose of keeping women in their place. I do realize that this book takes place before the 1990's and some changes have occured since that time, but in recent years the Arab countries have swung back to a very traditional viewpoint. An eye opening read and a frustrating look at a archaic system that should be changed but sadly probably won't. In this country of immense wealth, the men have the power and appear to have not intention of allowing their women to step out of their shadow existence. When government, religion and tradition are set so solidly in one direction, it would be incredibly difficult or even impossible to change.
Top Negative Review
I honestly am baffled as
I honestly am baffled as to why this book has such rave reviews. Sultana is supposed to be a bastion of feminine change in Saudi Arabia (and lest you forget, she will remind you every two or three pages), but she does little to actually, you know, change anything aside from mouth off to her brother every once in a while. The book is also full of contradictions that show that Sultana is still, at the time of writing/dictating the book, deeply immersed in the "mindset" of her country. In location 900 (I'm on a Kindle) she says, "...there are many classes of people in my land, from those various levels of the wealthy Royal Family down to that of lowly salaried workers. But no one, including foreign workers, is without the basic necessities of life. Our government ensures the well-being of all Saudis. Each male citizen is assured of a home, health care....Our female citizens are provided for by the men of their families..." Loc 1019 states that the "poorest Bedouins" have to live in tents and imply they have trouble feeding their families. Sultana is also guilty of stereotyping against other races, as shown by this unprompted comment: "unsmiling German contractors" [loc 1704]
1-5 of 18 reviews

This was an excellent boo

This was an excellent book. The writing is powerful and moving without being overly emotional. The writer states things simply without dwelling on either the bad or the good of the Arab world. She is factual and presents the perspective of Princess Sultana clearly and without personal bias. My copy included a reading guide and several appendices with helpful information on countries, Islamic law, and necessary facts. This is truly a great book for anyone who seeks to learn more about the Muslim world or the life of women in other countries.

This was an excellent boo

This was an excellent book. The writing is powerful and moving without being overly emotional. The writer states things simply without dwelling on either the bad or the good of the Arab world. She is factual and presents the perspective of Princess Sultana clearly and without personal bias. My copy included a reading guide and several appendices with helpful information on countries, Islamic law, and necessary facts. This is truly a great book for anyone who seeks to learn more about the Muslim world or the life of women in other countries.

My Rating: A+ My Revie

My Rating: A+ My Review: You would think after years and years of hearing about how Arab women are treated, after being a child in the early 90's when we put troops in Saudi Arabia, that it would be hard to shock me. But even after hearing from my parents and teachers what is done there, I have to admit that there where times when reading this book that I would have to set it down and digest what I'd just read. It was hard to wrap my mind around the passive violence, the archaic and brutal laws for not only women but foreigners to the land as well, and the vast wealth that the royal family in this country controls. I smiled often at the little victories that these women would obtain and cried when I read of the horrors they would have to go through and were expected to put up with. I was also amazed by Sultana's brutal honesty about not only the wicked men in her country but also the 'lazy' women who would talk about fighting for their rights, but never quite stand up and do what it took. This is an amazing and eye opening read. I recommend it to any woman!

My Rating: A+ My Review:

My Rating: A+ My Review: You would think after years and years of hearing about how Arab women are treated, after being a child in the early 90's when we put troops in Saudi Arabia, that it would be hard to shock me. But even after hearing from my parents and teachers what is done there, I have to admit that there where times when reading this book that I would have to set it down and digest what I'd just read. It was hard to wrap my mind around the passive violence, the archaic and brutal laws for not only women but foreigners to the land as well, and the vast wealth that the royal family in this country controls. I smiled often at the little victories that these women would obtain and cried when I read of the horrors they would have to go through and were expected to put up with. I was also amazed by Sultana's brutal honesty about not only the wicked men in her country but also the 'lazy' women who would talk about fighting for their rights, but never quite stand up and do what it took. This is an amazing and eye opening read. I recommend it to any woman!

This book was great! In a

This book was great! In a way disturbing, because it describes how different the Arab world is to the west. Yet, I have to say that there were uplifting, sad as well as happy moments throughout the whole book.
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Electrode, App-product, Comp-476640753, DC-prod-cdc01, ENV-prod-alpha, PROF-PROD, VER-29.0.16-rc-4, SHA-e3fc4b712ae1bb3abbc3da414314a20f8a9810e6, CID-
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Electrode, Comp-476640753, DC-prod-cdc01, ENV-prod-alpha, PROF-PROD, VER-29.0.16-rc-4, SHA-e3fc4b712ae1bb3abbc3da414314a20f8a9810e6, CID-9c97c336-190-16af2cd0a9ce53, Generated: Sun, 26 May 2019 06:21:25 GMT