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Catharine Arnold

Pandemic 1918 : Eyewitness Accounts from the Greatest Medical Holocaust in Modern History

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<p>Before AIDS or Ebola, there was the Spanish Flu -- Catharine Arnold's gripping narrative, <i>Pandemic 1918, </i>marks the 100th anniversary of an epidemic that altered world history. </p> <p></p>In January 1918, as World War I raged on, a new and terrifying virus began to spread across the globe. In three successive waves, from 1918 to 1919, influenza killed more than 50 million people. German soldiers termed it <i>Blitzkatarrh</i>, British soldiers referred to it as <i>Flanders Grippe</i>, but world-wide, the pandemic gained the notorious title of &quot;Spanish Flu&quot;. Nowhere on earth escaped: the United States recorded 550,000 deaths (five times its total military fatalities in the war) while European deaths totaled over two million. <p></p>Amid the war, some governments suppressed news of the outbreak. Even as entire battalions were decimated, with both the Allies and the Germans suffering massive casualties, the details of many servicemen's deaths were hidden to protect public morale. Meanwhile, civilian families were being struck down in their homes. The City of Philadelphia ran out of gravediggers and coffins, and mass burial trenches had to be excavated with steam shovels. Spanish flu conjured up the specter of the Black Death of 1348 and the great plague of 1665, while the medical profession, shattered after five terrible years of conflict, lacked the resources to contain and defeat this new enemy. <p></p>Through primary and archival sources, historian Catharine Arnold gives readers the first truly global account of the terrible epidemic. <p></p>

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Before AIDS or Ebola, there was the Spanish Flu -- Catharine Arnold's gripping narrative, Pandemic 1918, marks the 100th anniversary of an epidemic that altered world history.

In January 1918, as World War I raged on, a new and terrifying virus began to spread across the globe. In three successive waves, from 1918 to 1919, influenza killed more than 50 million people. German soldiers termed it Blitzkatarrh, British soldiers referred to it as Flanders Grippe, but world-wide, the pandemic gained the notorious title of "Spanish Flu". Nowhere on earth escaped: the United States recorded 550,000 deaths (five times its total military fatalities in the war) while European deaths totaled over two million.

Amid the war, some governments suppressed news of the outbreak. Even as entire battalions were decimated, with both the Allies and the Germans suffering massive casualties, the details of many servicemen's deaths were hidden to protect public morale. Meanwhile, civilian families were being struck down in their homes. The City of Philadelphia ran out of gravediggers and coffins, and mass burial trenches had to be excavated with steam shovels. Spanish flu conjured up the specter of the Black Death of 1348 and the great plague of 1665, while the medical profession, shattered after five terrible years of conflict, lacked the resources to contain and defeat this new enemy.

Through primary and archival sources, historian Catharine Arnold gives readers the first truly global account of the terrible epidemic.

Before AIDS or Ebola, there was the Spanish Flu — Catharine Arnold's gripping narrative, Pandemic 1918, marks the 100th anniversary of an epidemic that altered world history.

In January 1918, as World War I raged on, a new and terrifying virus began to spread across the globe. In three successive waves, from 1918 to 1919, influenza killed more than 50 million people. German soldiers termed it Blitzkatarrh, British soldiers referred to it as Flanders Grippe, but world-wide, the pandemic gained the notorious title of “Spanish Flu”. Nowhere on earth escaped: the United States recorded 550,000 deaths (five times its total military fatalities in the war) while European deaths totaled over two million.

Amid the war, some governments suppressed news of the outbreak. Even as entire battalions were decimated, with both the Allies and the Germans suffering massive casualties, the details of many servicemen’s deaths were hidden to protect public morale. Meanwhile, civilian families were being struck down in their homes. The City of Philadelphia ran out of gravediggers and coffins, and mass burial trenches had to be excavated with steam shovels. Spanish flu conjured up the specter of the Black Death of 1348 and the great plague of 1665, while the medical profession, shattered after five terrible years of conflict, lacked the resources to contain and defeat this new enemy.

Through primary and archival sources, historian Catharine Arnold gives readers the first truly global account of the terrible epidemic.

Specifications

Publisher
St. Martin's Publishing Group
Book Format
Hardcover
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
368
Author
Catharine Arnold
Title
Pandemic 1918 - Hardcover
ISBN-13
9781250139436
Publication Date
August, 2018
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
9.57 x 6.43 x 1.29 Inches
ISBN-10
1250139430

Customer Reviews

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Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

pandemic, war-is-hell,...

pandemic, war-is-hell, historical-research, historical-places-events, history-and-culture, historical-figures, horror This volume presents a more extensive study of the transmission of this deadly opportunistic disease as it used the vector of war and also relates names of those who suffered it still familiar these hundred years later. This presentation also goes into greater detail regarding the rigors suffered by the victims and does examine it all from the British perspective. The publisher's blurb is quite respectable and ought to be interesting to the general public. I, on the other hand, represent different segments: became an RN in 1968, addicted to history, have read other books and theses on the subject, grandmother had the disease and it left heart damage, uncle had it and was told that Parkinson's was a late side effect. The writer reminds that there was no way to visualize a virus or prove animal or avian hosting and mutation at that time, and everyone on each continent was so terrified that even historic remedies were tried. I requested and received a free ebook review copy from St. Martin's Press via NetGalley.

Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Fifty million dead wor...

Fifty million dead world wide, over a third of the worlds population dead in just one year. One could greet a friend in the morning, and find out that person died the next day. I can't even imagine that something, outside of a war could cause such a tragedy as this. Yet, it was the Spanish flu, the Spanish lady that would spread across the globe, leaving heartache and terror in its wake. This book describes how it was spread, where it was spread, but also includes letters, journal and diary entires, from those who were present at the time. WWI and troop movements, trains, ports, all greatly helped the Spanish lady. A young Vera Brittain, a nurse in one of the British camps, was cheered seeing the healthy looking American troops arrive. Of course, she had no way of knowing they carried death with them. She would go on to write of her experiences in her, [book:Testament of Youth|374388]. Katherine Anne Porter lived through it and wrote [book:Pale Horse, Pale Rider|672222], chronicling her experience. Roosevelt and all he and Eleanor's children contracted the flu. Aided by one nurse, there being such a shortage of nurses and doctors, Eleanor nursed them through. A young man, underage and against his father wishes, joined the ambulance Corp. and caught the flu. He too would live, and become Walt Disney. It was the children, and their experiences that effected me the most. The girls jumping rope to "I had a little bird Its name was Enza I opened the window and In-flew-enza" The young boy whose friend talked him into observing one of the daily funerals now taking place in their town. Watching, he never got over seeing the gravediggers dumping the bodies out of their coffins into a mass grave. Of course their was a shortage of coffins, shortages of everything. No one knew how to treat it, how to stop it. Mass panic and terror. It was a time that one can only hope never comes again.


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