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Mansfield Park : 200th Anniversary Edition

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Paperback, Queensbridge Publishing, 2014, ISBN13 9780981318370, ISBN10 0981318371

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Mansfield Park: 200th Anniversary Edition This third novel by Jane Austen; Mansfield Park; has brought about a drastic change not previously seen in other works by the author. Mansfield Park highlights more serious issues such as religion, slavery, and politics. In the most eloquent tone, Jane ma

Specifications

Publisher
Queensbridge Publishing, On Demand Publishing, LLC-Create Space
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
ENG
Number of Pages
422
Author
Jane Austen
ISBN-13
9780981318370
Publication Date
May, 2014
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
9.00 x 6.00 x 0.94 Inches
ISBN-10
0981318371

Customer Reviews

5 stars
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65
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25
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12
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3
Most helpful positive review
50 customers found this helpful
Mansfield Park is usua...
Mansfield Park is usually tied with Emma for least-loved of Austen's books, and though the heroines of each are very, very different, the two books' lower favor with Austenites is usually due to Fanny and Emma, respectively. While Emma is an interfering, independent young woman, Fanny is her exact opposite, and loves nothing better than to hide while others receive all the attention. Many modern readers find Fanny too passive, and call her "weak." But this misses the essential point of the story - strength is not in being feisty and independent, but holding firm to your convictions under pressure. This review will contain spoilers, so proceed with caution. Mansfield Park is the story of Fanny Price, the dependent niece of Sir Thomas Bertram who is taken into the Bertram family at a young age as a favor to her parents, who are not well-to-do. From the first, Fanny is taught her inferior place in the family by her officious Aunt Norris, who dotes on Fanny's cousins, Maria and Julia. At Mansfield Park, her cousin Edmund is the only one who sees Fanny's distress and tries to make things easier for her. He quickly becomes her only confidante and comfort in the Bertram home, and this continues into Fanny's adulthood. When the charming brother and sister Henry and Mary Crawford come into the neighborhood, things begin to change - and not, in Fanny's opinion, for the better. Austen's characterizations are excellent, as always. I think she achieved something special in Lady Bertram, even though my lady is quite a background sort of person. Indeed, it may be because of her minor-character status that the execution of the character is so striking to me. The word for Lady Bertram is "indolent," and rarely has anyone exemplified it better. She is not ill-meaning, and has a good heart, but she cannot be bothered to do anything for anyone. She is comfortable, pleasant, and in many ways only half-alive. And yet I like her very well, for some unaccountable reason. Austen achieves similar things with the character of Henry Crawford. Usually I'm able to disdain the bad guys in Austen's world as cads and weaklings, but Crawford is written so well that I think I feel some of his charm even through the pages of a book. The way Austen probes his motivations and feelings is really fascinating. His main vice is not deliberate deception or evil, but rather overweening vanity and selfishness. And he is capable of good things. The other characters are also well-drawn. Sir Thomas in all his dignity and yet truly good beliefs underneath the formality. Tom, with his thoughtless profligacy and unfixed principles. Maria with her haughty pride of beauty and money, and helpless love for someone who slights her. Edmund, with his kindness and, sometimes, blindness. Julia, with her jealousy of Maria and her selfishness. Aunt Norris, with her selfish officiousness and ruthless economy. Mr. Rushworth, with his money and his ridiculous two and forty speeches. Mary Crawford, with her unsound principles and disdain for anything unfashionable. We get a clear picture even of Dr. and Mrs. Grant, who have almost no dialogue whatsoever in the story. Many readers disparage Fanny, the principal character of the story, as weak and passive. Certainly she does not have the spunk and polite sauciness of an Elizabeth Bennett or Emma Woodhouse. Constantly belittled during her formative years and made to feel her inferiority by Aunt Norris, Fanny is terrified of being singled out for any kind of special notice. She was passive and retiring by nature, and her upbringing had the effect of exaggerating these qualities. Many modern readers can't stand this in a female character; modern conventions have taught us that heroines must be sassy and spunky. But I tend to fall into the small but determined camp that appreciates Fanny for who she is. Fanny is always ready to give way for the convenience of others - but this does not stop her from observing their behavior, and venturing private judgments on it. And she is not often wrong in her assessments of the people around her. Despite her pliable nature, Fanny stops short when asked to do something against her principles. She refuses to take part in the not-quite-respectable play that her cousins put on, even though her Aunt Norris makes her feel very guilty over refusing. This foreshadows a later refusal, when Fanny dares to defy the expectations of the Bertrams on the much more serious matter of a marriage proposal. These refusals cause Fanny a great deal of wretchedness, but she stands her ground. And this is why I love her. Not because she has a witty tongue or a keen eye for the foibles of others in the mode of the usual feisty heroine, but because she holds true to her beliefs even when under pressure from every quarter to compromise them. To me, this makes her much worthier of the adjective "strong" than many another heroine who talks back to the men and dares great things. Fanny is a strong woman because she, being weak, still stands firm on her convictions. Mansfield Park is the longest and probably most complex of Austen's novels, and though there is a fair bit of pointed humor in the observations about Lady Bertram and Aunt Norris, it has a bitter edge to it. I also think the great tragedy/transgression of this story is the darkest of all Austen's stories, even worse than Lizzy's actions in Pride & Prejudice. Because of the definite lack of lighthearted wit and the seriousness of the evils committed, this is not a bubbling romance of misunderstandings and genteel follies. The denouément gives quite a lot to think about, especially regarding Fanny's probable actions had things happened differently than they did. I do NOT recommend the 1999 movie starring Frances O'Connor. It changed Fanny's personality to something more acceptable to modern tastes, involved Sir Thomas in graphic, horrific barbarism in the slave plantations of Antigua, showed the illicit affair between Crawford and Maria, had Fanny actually accept Crawford at one point (!), and generally missed the whole point of the original story. Nor can I give the recent Masterpiece Theatre version starring Billie Piper much praise; Piper, though a good actress, is completely wrong for Fanny, and the whole production lacked panache. I'm not familiar with other film adaptations of the story, but in general I've heard they are all rather lacking. Pity. In some ways this is an "ugly duckling" story, before such things became popular in the realm of chick-lit. But Fanny does not transform herself in the course of the story; she remains in many ways what she always has been. Perhaps it's more that the people around her transform slowly until they are finally able to see the beauty of her character. With fantastic characters, deft writing, probing insight, and occasional wryness, Austen's Mansfield Park is a thought-provoking story with an unusual heroine who compels respect instead of mere amusement. Highly recommended.
Most helpful negative review
1 customers found this helpful
I cant say I was real...
I can't say I was really crazy about this book, as it turns out, I can't say I liked one single character in the entire story! But, I persevered and slogged through the whole thing! Fanny: She was such a ninny, and only showed she had a spine by refusing to marry Henry Crawford. I only give her credit for seeing through the Crawfords, but what a wimp! She couldn't say anything about them. I did feel sorry for her though, when Sir Thomas was at first so upset with her and called her ungrateful after refusing Henry Crawford. She couldn't tell him why because it would expose his daughter, Maria, for what she really was. Edmund Bertram: He is not even worthy of Fanny. Another spineless soul who couldn't see through Mary Crawford or her brother, or sisters until it was all too obviously put in front of him. And he didn't realize Fanny was the one for him until Mary was out of the picture. Sir Thomas: Again, he wasn't too bad, but just had no street sense! He couldn't see how good Fanny was, or how awful Mrs. Norris was, or how spoiled his daughters were until it was all too late! Henry Crawford: Well, we're not supposed to really like him, but he was vain and uncaring, and not even really good looking (unlike in the movie.) Mary Crawford: Again we're not supposed to like her, and I hated her for taking Fanny's horse in the beginning and leading Edmund on, and just saying all sorts of mean things about the clergy. Not to mention how disappointing she was at the end and the way she treated Edmund after the Henry/Maria scandal. But, since Edmund was such a wimp, he deserved what he got from her. As for the other other minor characters, like Mrs. Norris, Lady Bertram, Mrs. Price, Mr. Price - uggh to all of them. I think the only person I actually liked and could find no fault with was her brother, William.
Most helpful positive review
50 customers found this helpful
Mansfield Park is usua...
Mansfield Park is usually tied with Emma for least-loved of Austen's books, and though the heroines of each are very, very different, the two books' lower favor with Austenites is usually due to Fanny and Emma, respectively. While Emma is an interfering, independent young woman, Fanny is her exact opposite, and loves nothing better than to hide while others receive all the attention. Many modern readers find Fanny too passive, and call her "weak." But this misses the essential point of the story - strength is not in being feisty and independent, but holding firm to your convictions under pressure. This review will contain spoilers, so proceed with caution. Mansfield Park is the story of Fanny Price, the dependent niece of Sir Thomas Bertram who is taken into the Bertram family at a young age as a favor to her parents, who are not well-to-do. From the first, Fanny is taught her inferior place in the family by her officious Aunt Norris, who dotes on Fanny's cousins, Maria and Julia. At Mansfield Park, her cousin Edmund is the only one who sees Fanny's distress and tries to make things easier for her. He quickly becomes her only confidante and comfort in the Bertram home, and this continues into Fanny's adulthood. When the charming brother and sister Henry and Mary Crawford come into the neighborhood, things begin to change - and not, in Fanny's opinion, for the better. Austen's characterizations are excellent, as always. I think she achieved something special in Lady Bertram, even though my lady is quite a background sort of person. Indeed, it may be because of her minor-character status that the execution of the character is so striking to me. The word for Lady Bertram is "indolent," and rarely has anyone exemplified it better. She is not ill-meaning, and has a good heart, but she cannot be bothered to do anything for anyone. She is comfortable, pleasant, and in many ways only half-alive. And yet I like her very well, for some unaccountable reason. Austen achieves similar things with the character of Henry Crawford. Usually I'm able to disdain the bad guys in Austen's world as cads and weaklings, but Crawford is written so well that I think I feel some of his charm even through the pages of a book. The way Austen probes his motivations and feelings is really fascinating. His main vice is not deliberate deception or evil, but rather overweening vanity and selfishness. And he is capable of good things. The other characters are also well-drawn. Sir Thomas in all his dignity and yet truly good beliefs underneath the formality. Tom, with his thoughtless profligacy and unfixed principles. Maria with her haughty pride of beauty and money, and helpless love for someone who slights her. Edmund, with his kindness and, sometimes, blindness. Julia, with her jealousy of Maria and her selfishness. Aunt Norris, with her selfish officiousness and ruthless economy. Mr. Rushworth, with his money and his ridiculous two and forty speeches. Mary Crawford, with her unsound principles and disdain for anything unfashionable. We get a clear picture even of Dr. and Mrs. Grant, who have almost no dialogue whatsoever in the story. Many readers disparage Fanny, the principal character of the story, as weak and passive. Certainly she does not have the spunk and polite sauciness of an Elizabeth Bennett or Emma Woodhouse. Constantly belittled during her formative years and made to feel her inferiority by Aunt Norris, Fanny is terrified of being singled out for any kind of special notice. She was passive and retiring by nature, and her upbringing had the effect of exaggerating these qualities. Many modern readers can't stand this in a female character; modern conventions have taught us that heroines must be sassy and spunky. But I tend to fall into the small but determined camp that appreciates Fanny for who she is. Fanny is always ready to give way for the convenience of others - but this does not stop her from observing their behavior, and venturing private judgments on it. And she is not often wrong in her assessments of the people around her. Despite her pliable nature, Fanny stops short when asked to do something against her principles. She refuses to take part in the not-quite-respectable play that her cousins put on, even though her Aunt Norris makes her feel very guilty over refusing. This foreshadows a later refusal, when Fanny dares to defy the expectations of the Bertrams on the much more serious matter of a marriage proposal. These refusals cause Fanny a great deal of wretchedness, but she stands her ground. And this is why I love her. Not because she has a witty tongue or a keen eye for the foibles of others in the mode of the usual feisty heroine, but because she holds true to her beliefs even when under pressure from every quarter to compromise them. To me, this makes her much worthier of the adjective "strong" than many another heroine who talks back to the men and dares great things. Fanny is a strong woman because she, being weak, still stands firm on her convictions. Mansfield Park is the longest and probably most complex of Austen's novels, and though there is a fair bit of pointed humor in the observations about Lady Bertram and Aunt Norris, it has a bitter edge to it. I also think the great tragedy/transgression of this story is the darkest of all Austen's stories, even worse than Lizzy's actions in Pride & Prejudice. Because of the definite lack of lighthearted wit and the seriousness of the evils committed, this is not a bubbling romance of misunderstandings and genteel follies. The denouément gives quite a lot to think about, especially regarding Fanny's probable actions had things happened differently than they did. I do NOT recommend the 1999 movie starring Frances O'Connor. It changed Fanny's personality to something more acceptable to modern tastes, involved Sir Thomas in graphic, horrific barbarism in the slave plantations of Antigua, showed the illicit affair between Crawford and Maria, had Fanny actually accept Crawford at one point (!), and generally missed the whole point of the original story. Nor can I give the recent Masterpiece Theatre version starring Billie Piper much praise; Piper, though a good actress, is completely wrong for Fanny, and the whole production lacked panache. I'm not familiar with other film adaptations of the story, but in general I've heard they are all rather lacking. Pity. In some ways this is an "ugly duckling" story, before such things became popular in the realm of chick-lit. But Fanny does not transform herself in the course of the story; she remains in many ways what she always has been. Perhaps it's more that the people around her transform slowly until they are finally able to see the beauty of her character. With fantastic characters, deft writing, probing insight, and occasional wryness, Austen's Mansfield Park is a thought-provoking story with an unusual heroine who compels respect instead of mere amusement. Highly recommended.
Most helpful negative review
1 customers found this helpful
I cant say I was real...
I can't say I was really crazy about this book, as it turns out, I can't say I liked one single character in the entire story! But, I persevered and slogged through the whole thing! Fanny: She was such a ninny, and only showed she had a spine by refusing to marry Henry Crawford. I only give her credit for seeing through the Crawfords, but what a wimp! She couldn't say anything about them. I did feel sorry for her though, when Sir Thomas was at first so upset with her and called her ungrateful after refusing Henry Crawford. She couldn't tell him why because it would expose his daughter, Maria, for what she really was. Edmund Bertram: He is not even worthy of Fanny. Another spineless soul who couldn't see through Mary Crawford or her brother, or sisters until it was all too obviously put in front of him. And he didn't realize Fanny was the one for him until Mary was out of the picture. Sir Thomas: Again, he wasn't too bad, but just had no street sense! He couldn't see how good Fanny was, or how awful Mrs. Norris was, or how spoiled his daughters were until it was all too late! Henry Crawford: Well, we're not supposed to really like him, but he was vain and uncaring, and not even really good looking (unlike in the movie.) Mary Crawford: Again we're not supposed to like her, and I hated her for taking Fanny's horse in the beginning and leading Edmund on, and just saying all sorts of mean things about the clergy. Not to mention how disappointing she was at the end and the way she treated Edmund after the Henry/Maria scandal. But, since Edmund was such a wimp, he deserved what he got from her. As for the other other minor characters, like Mrs. Norris, Lady Bertram, Mrs. Price, Mr. Price - uggh to all of them. I think the only person I actually liked and could find no fault with was her brother, William.
1-5 of 149 reviews

Mansfield Park is usua...

Mansfield Park is usually tied with Emma for least-loved of Austen's books, and though the heroines of each are very, very different, the two books' lower favor with Austenites is usually due to Fanny and Emma, respectively. While Emma is an interfering, independent young woman, Fanny is her exact opposite, and loves nothing better than to hide while others receive all the attention. Many modern readers find Fanny too passive, and call her "weak." But this misses the essential point of the story - strength is not in being feisty and independent, but holding firm to your convictions under pressure. This review will contain spoilers, so proceed with caution. Mansfield Park is the story of Fanny Price, the dependent niece of Sir Thomas Bertram who is taken into the Bertram family at a young age as a favor to her parents, who are not well-to-do. From the first, Fanny is taught her inferior place in the family by her officious Aunt Norris, who dotes on Fanny's cousins, Maria and Julia. At Mansfield Park, her cousin Edmund is the only one who sees Fanny's distress and tries to make things easier for her. He quickly becomes her only confidante and comfort in the Bertram home, and this continues into Fanny's adulthood. When the charming brother and sister Henry and Mary Crawford come into the neighborhood, things begin to change - and not, in Fanny's opinion, for the better. Austen's characterizations are excellent, as always. I think she achieved something special in Lady Bertram, even though my lady is quite a background sort of person. Indeed, it may be because of her minor-character status that the execution of the character is so striking to me. The word for Lady Bertram is "indolent," and rarely has anyone exemplified it better. She is not ill-meaning, and has a good heart, but she cannot be bothered to do anything for anyone. She is comfortable, pleasant, and in many ways only half-alive. And yet I like her very well, for some unaccountable reason. Austen achieves similar things with the character of Henry Crawford. Usually I'm able to disdain the bad guys in Austen's world as cads and weaklings, but Crawford is written so well that I think I feel some of his charm even through the pages of a book. The way Austen probes his motivations and feelings is really fascinating. His main vice is not deliberate deception or evil, but rather overweening vanity and selfishness. And he is capable of good things. The other characters are also well-drawn. Sir Thomas in all his dignity and yet truly good beliefs underneath the formality. Tom, with his thoughtless profligacy and unfixed principles. Maria with her haughty pride of beauty and money, and helpless love for someone who slights her. Edmund, with his kindness and, sometimes, blindness. Julia, with her jealousy of Maria and her selfishness. Aunt Norris, with her selfish officiousness and ruthless economy. Mr. Rushworth, with his money and his ridiculous two and forty speeches. Mary Crawford, with her unsound principles and disdain for anything unfashionable. We get a clear picture even of Dr. and Mrs. Grant, who have almost no dialogue whatsoever in the story. Many readers disparage Fanny, the principal character of the story, as weak and passive. Certainly she does not have the spunk and polite sauciness of an Elizabeth Bennett or Emma Woodhouse. Constantly belittled during her formative years and made to feel her inferiority by Aunt Norris, Fanny is terrified of being singled out for any kind of special notice. She was passive and retiring by nature, and her upbringing had the effect of exaggerating these qualities. Many modern readers can't stand this in a female character; modern conventions have taught us that heroines must be sassy and spunky. But I tend to fall into the small but determined camp that appreciates Fanny for who she is. Fanny is always ready to give way for the convenience of others - but this does not stop her from observing their behavior, and venturing private judgments on it. And she is not often wrong in her assessments of the people around her. Despite her pliable nature, Fanny stops short when asked to do something against her principles. She refuses to take part in the not-quite-respectable play that her cousins put on, even though her Aunt Norris makes her feel very guilty over refusing. This foreshadows a later refusal, when Fanny dares to defy the expectations of the Bertrams on the much more serious matter of a marriage proposal. These refusals cause Fanny a great deal of wretchedness, but she stands her ground. And this is why I love her. Not because she has a witty tongue or a keen eye for the foibles of others in the mode of the usual feisty heroine, but because she holds true to her beliefs even when under pressure from every quarter to compromise them. To me, this makes her much worthier of the adjective "strong" than many another heroine who talks back to the men and dares great things. Fanny is a strong woman because she, being weak, still stands firm on her convictions. Mansfield Park is the longest and probably most complex of Austen's novels, and though there is a fair bit of pointed humor in the observations about Lady Bertram and Aunt Norris, it has a bitter edge to it. I also think the great tragedy/transgression of this story is the darkest of all Austen's stories, even worse than Lizzy's actions in Pride & Prejudice. Because of the definite lack of lighthearted wit and the seriousness of the evils committed, this is not a bubbling romance of misunderstandings and genteel follies. The denouément gives quite a lot to think about, especially regarding Fanny's probable actions had things happened differently than they did. I do NOT recommend the 1999 movie starring Frances O'Connor. It changed Fanny's personality to something more acceptable to modern tastes, involved Sir Thomas in graphic, horrific barbarism in the slave plantations of Antigua, showed the illicit affair between Crawford and Maria, had Fanny actually accept Crawford at one point (!), and generally missed the whole point of the original story. Nor can I give the recent Masterpiece Theatre version starring Billie Piper much praise; Piper, though a good actress, is completely wrong for Fanny, and the whole production lacked panache. I'm not familiar with other film adaptations of the story, but in general I've heard they are all rather lacking. Pity. In some ways this is an "ugly duckling" story, before such things became popular in the realm of chick-lit. But Fanny does not transform herself in the course of the story; she remains in many ways what she always has been. Perhaps it's more that the people around her transform slowly until they are finally able to see the beauty of her character. With fantastic characters, deft writing, probing insight, and occasional wryness, Austen's Mansfield Park is a thought-provoking story with an unusual heroine who compels respect instead of mere amusement. Highly recommended.

Why is it when Im on ...

Why is it when I'm on the train going east, everybody is going west? Why, when I am on the elevator going up, everybody else is on the elevator going down? Why is it that when so many readers seem to dislike Fanny Price and Mansfield Park, I absolutly love her as well as Mansfield Park? Having read all of Austen's major works I sensed from the start that Mansfield Park would become my favorite. Austen's characters are richly drawn and each deciferable in their own way. Fanny is Cinderella to her well to do Aunts, Norris and Lady Bertram. I don't believe I have met a character that I dislike more than Aunt Norris. She requests that Fanny move to Mansfield from her crowded home in Portsmouth only to pawn her off on her sister's family headed by Lady and Lord Bertram. She is essentially a servant to them and is repeatedly reminded of her place within the family. Fanny is greatful to be at Mansfield and knows her place. Oh, how the family is shocked to find that a financially independendent gentleman is smitten with Fanny. Fanny's love however is with another similarly shocking young man who has his sights set on another. How will this love triangle be reduced to a duo? Will Aunt Norris ever get the comeuppance she justly deserves? Jane Austen, you tease, makes the reader dwell, hope, dream of a suitable outcome until the final chapter. This book has suspense, shocking revelations and is much more mature in material than any other Austen I have read. I found Fanny to be an endearing creature who trusts her instincts despite what others may believe to be the best for her. You go, Fanny. Would I recommend it: I truly recommend this novel, it is an absolute classic in my opinion.

I approached Mansfield...

I approached Mansfield Park with a bit of trepidation, as most Austen fans I know consider this the worst of the lot. I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed the book. I think the key is to go in with an open mind and to not compare it too closely to Pride and Prejudice or any other work. The writing is excellent and Austen's humor is very present, especially in the descriptions, dialogue and actions of the secondary characters. Mansfield Park is different from the other Austens I've read (P&P, Sense and Sensibility and Emma) in that it is more serious in its concerns and more of a commentary on morality. But far from boring or preachy, Austen strikes a nice balance between those concerns and the humor and social observation included in her other works. While I did wish Fanny Price had more spunk in some situations, the circumstances of her childhood and her being brought to Mansfield are such that her rather timid and retreating nature were understandable. Since Mansfield Park is not, to my mind, intended as a romantic work, the lack of chemistry between Fanny and Edmund also makes sense. Austen is less concerned with them as lovers than as moral figures whose interior compasses bring them inexorably together. This is definitely not my favorite of the Austen novels I've read, but it is still entertaining and perhaps more thought-provoking.

Mansfield Park is by n...

Mansfield Park is by no means the best Jane Austen work I've encountered, but I still view it as a valuable piece of literature. Austen once again excels at the task of conveying her message through her characters. In this work, the reader is introduced to Fanny Price - a young woman of high character and low finances - who is raised in the household of her cousins, the Bertrams - who are wealthy but lack Fanny's high morals. The contrast of Fanny and her female cousins paints Austen's oft used theme of character versus class and sensibility versus stature. Meanwhile Fanny's cousin Edmund (the object of her affections) teaches the lesson of the blindness of "love" as he relentlessly pursues a woman who is, in Fanny's eyes at least, entirely wrong for him. I found Mansfield Park to be a good story but a bit difficult to read in terms of the pacing of the book. Many chapters went by with little story development only to have the denouement contain many rushed plot points that I craved further details about. Nevertheless, Austen's recipe ingredients of honorable young women, unrequited love, faithless cads in the disguise of noble suitors, and true love in the end still built an enjoyable book that I am happy to have read.

Mansfield Park by Jane...

Mansfield Park by Jane Austen was originally published in 1814 and tells the story of Fanny Price who is sent by her struggling family to reside with their rich relatives at Mansfield Park when she is ten years old. Fanny is the absolute picture of the poor relative, she is meek and mild and at first I found she lacked the spark of other Jane Austen heroines that I have come to love. However, over the course of the book, Fanny proved to be kind, patient and thoughtful. She had a strong sense of justice and morality and this, along with her backbone of steel eventually endeared her to me. I admit that I struggled with the first third of the book as it seemed to be moving very slowly. I disliked the romantic lead of Edmund, finding him both stiff and priggish. I spent some time rooting for Fanny's love to be bestowed on Charles, but he eventually showed his true colors and I was glad that Fanny had resisted him. As the story intensified, Mansfield Park grew on me and by the end of the book, I was sorry to have to leave these characters behind. As in most of Jane Austen's books, this is an excellent social commentary as she examines, in particular, the social influences and the traditions and rules of courting and marriage. While Fanny grew in her ambiguous role of lowly member of the household to become the most esteemed member of the family, so too did Mansfield Park grow in my opinion. Although the romance of these two cousins is difficult to accept in today's world, there is still much to admire with the author's exquisite prose and close observations of upper English society in the 1800's.

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Electrode, Comp-389266853, DC-prod-cdc02, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-30.0.0, SHA-5b22732e63249d37428982287bc451eb2e1aab93, CID-ba720251-a7f-16dcf7ad4b841f, Generated: Tue, 15 Oct 2019 12:53:16 GMT