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David Grann

Killers of the Flower Moon : The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI (Hardcover)

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&quot;Grann revisits a ... series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and ... new evidence, the book [outlines the steps that reveal] a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is [an] ... indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long&quot;--Amazon.com. <b>NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST <p></p>Disturbing and riveting...It will sear your soul. <b>--</b>Dave Eggers, <i>New York Times Book Review</i> <p></p>SHELF AWARENESS'S BEST BOOK OF 2017 <p></p>Named a best book of the year by <i>Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, GQ, Time, Newsday, Entertainment Weekly, Time Magazine, </i>NPR's Maureen Corrigan<i>, </i>NPR's On Point, <i> Vogue</i>, Smithsonian, Cosmopolitan, <i>Seattle Times, Bloomberg, Lit Hub's </i>Ultimate Best Books<i>, Library Journal, Paste, Kirkus, </i> Slate.com<i> </i>and</b> <i><b> Book Browse</b><br /></i> <b><i><br /></i>From <i>New Yorker</i> staff writer David Grann, #1 <i>New York Times</i> best-selling author of <i>The Lost City of Z, </i> a twisting, haunting true-life murder mystery about one of the most monstrous crimes in American history</b> <p></p>In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. <br /> Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances. <br /> In this last remnant of the Wild West--where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the &quot;Phantom Terror,&quot; roamed--many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization's first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection. Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. <br /> In <i>Killers of the Flower Moon, </i>David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and startling new evidence, the book is a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, as each step in the investigation reveals a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is a searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long. <i>Killers of the Flower Moon</i> is utterly compelling, but also emotionally devastating.

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"Grann revisits a ... series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and ... new evidence, the book [outlines the steps that reveal] a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is [an] ... indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long"--Amazon.com. NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST

Disturbing and riveting...It will sear your soul. --Dave Eggers, New York Times Book Review

SHELF AWARENESS'S BEST BOOK OF 2017

Named a best book of the year by Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, GQ, Time, Newsday, Entertainment Weekly, Time Magazine, NPR's Maureen Corrigan, NPR's On Point, Vogue, Smithsonian, Cosmopolitan, Seattle Times, Bloomberg, Lit Hub's Ultimate Best Books, Library Journal, Paste, Kirkus, Slate.com and
Book Browse

From New Yorker staff writer David Grann, #1 New York Times best-selling author of The Lost City of Z, a twisting, haunting true-life murder mystery about one of the most monstrous crimes in American history

In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.
Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances.
In this last remnant of the Wild West--where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the "Phantom Terror," roamed--many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization's first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection. Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history.
In Killers of the Flower Moon, David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and startling new evidence, the book is a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, as each step in the investigation reveals a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is a searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long. Killers of the Flower Moon is utterly compelling, but also emotionally devastating.NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER   -  NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST 

"Disturbing and riveting...It will sear your soul." Dave Eggers, New York Times Book Review

SHELF AWARENESS'S BEST BOOK OF 2017

Named a best book of the year by Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, GQ, Time, Newsday, Entertainment Weekly, Time Magazine, NPR's Maureen CorriganNPR's "On Point," Vogue, Smithsonian, Cosmopolitan, Seattle Times, Bloomberg, Lit Hub's "Ultimate Best Books," Library Journal, Paste, Kirkus, Slate.com and
Book Browse

From New Yorker staff writer David Grann, #1 New York Times best-selling author of The Lost City of Z, a twisting, haunting true-life murder mystery about one of the most monstrous crimes in American history

       
In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.
      Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances.
      In this last remnant of the Wild West—where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the “Phantom Terror,” roamed—many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection.  Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. 
      In Killers of the Flower Moon, David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and startling new evidence, the book is a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, as each step in the investigation reveals a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is a searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long. Killers of the Flower Moon is utterly compelling, but also emotionally devastating.

Specifications

Language
English
Publisher
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Book Format
Hardcover
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
352
Author
David Grann
Title
Killers of the Flower Moon
ISBN-13
9780385534246
Publication Date
April, 2017
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
9.30 x 6.30 x 1.30 Inches
ISBN-10
0385534248

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Average Rating:(4.3)out of 5 stars
100%Recommended(2 of 2)
5 stars
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4 stars
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3 stars
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2 stars
1
1 star
2
Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
Great read
A very good read. At first thought the book started out slow but as I continue to read it I was fascinated by the story and amazed that this happened. Would recommend this book to anyone especially if they enjoy history.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
I wasnt previously aw...
I wasn't previously aware of the Osage Indian murders of the 1920s, so this new summary of the case by the author of "The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon" did sound intriguing. It didn't seem to have any great revelations though. You could obtain the same basic understanding of the case from just looking through the Wikipedia entry on it. I've since discovered that there have been previous non-fiction books on the subject such as 1994's "Bloodland: A Family Story of Oil, Greed and Murder on the Osage Reservation" and 1998's "The Osage Indian Murders: The True Story Of A Multiple Murder Plot To Acquire The Estates Of Wealthy Osage Tribe Members" and several fiction novels that have incorporated elements into their plots. Novels from 1934's "Sundown" to 2008's "The Osage Rose" are based in the locale and time period and/or use fictionalized plots based on it. Writer Grann was presumably searching for some sort of eureka moment as a great number of the murders were never even identified as such at the time and very few were ever charged and convicted for their crimes. It doesn't seem a great revelation that local law enforcement and initial FBI officers bungled the investigation, or that J. Edgar Hoover seems to have declared victory when only a few of the actual murderers were caught and that he basically ignored the FBI agents in the future when there was no further reflected glory for himself as FBI Director to be had. Sidenote: I listened to the audiobook version which is oddly split between 3 narrators, the central voice being Will Patton during the investigation and trial phase. I probably have listened to too many Stephen King novels narrated by Patton, because his voice seemed too creepy for the role i.e. he was sounding too much like the Brady Hartsfield voice in the Bill Hodges Trilogy.
Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
Great read
A very good read. At first thought the book started out slow but as I continue to read it I was fascinated by the story and amazed that this happened. Would recommend this book to anyone especially if they enjoy history.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
I wasnt previously aw...
I wasn't previously aware of the Osage Indian murders of the 1920s, so this new summary of the case by the author of "The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon" did sound intriguing. It didn't seem to have any great revelations though. You could obtain the same basic understanding of the case from just looking through the Wikipedia entry on it. I've since discovered that there have been previous non-fiction books on the subject such as 1994's "Bloodland: A Family Story of Oil, Greed and Murder on the Osage Reservation" and 1998's "The Osage Indian Murders: The True Story Of A Multiple Murder Plot To Acquire The Estates Of Wealthy Osage Tribe Members" and several fiction novels that have incorporated elements into their plots. Novels from 1934's "Sundown" to 2008's "The Osage Rose" are based in the locale and time period and/or use fictionalized plots based on it. Writer Grann was presumably searching for some sort of eureka moment as a great number of the murders were never even identified as such at the time and very few were ever charged and convicted for their crimes. It doesn't seem a great revelation that local law enforcement and initial FBI officers bungled the investigation, or that J. Edgar Hoover seems to have declared victory when only a few of the actual murderers were caught and that he basically ignored the FBI agents in the future when there was no further reflected glory for himself as FBI Director to be had. Sidenote: I listened to the audiobook version which is oddly split between 3 narrators, the central voice being Will Patton during the investigation and trial phase. I probably have listened to too many Stephen King novels narrated by Patton, because his voice seemed too creepy for the role i.e. he was sounding too much like the Brady Hartsfield voice in the Bill Hodges Trilogy.
A very good read. At first thought the book started out slow but as I continue to read it I was fascinated by the story and amazed that this happened. Would recommend this book to anyone especially if they enjoy history.
I wasn't previously aware of the Osage Indian murders of the 1920s, so this new summary of the case by the author of "The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon" did sound intriguing. It didn't seem to have any great revelations though. You could obtain the same basic understanding of the case from just looking through the Wikipedia entry on it. I've since discovered that there have been previous non-fiction books on the subject such as 1994's "Bloodland: A Family Story of Oil, Greed and Murder on the Osage Reservation" and 1998's "The Osage Indian Murders: The True Story Of A Multiple Murder Plot To Acquire The Estates Of Wealthy Osage Tribe Members" and several fiction novels that have incorporated elements into their plots. Novels from 1934's "Sundown" to 2008's "The Osage Rose" are based in the locale and time period and/or use fictionalized plots based on it. Writer Grann was presumably searching for some sort of eureka moment as a great number of the murders were never even identified as such at the time and very few were ever charged and convicted for their crimes. It doesn't seem a great revelation that local law enforcement and initial FBI officers bungled the investigation, or that J. Edgar Hoover seems to have declared victory when only a few of the actual murderers were caught and that he basically ignored the FBI agents in the future when there was no further reflected glory for himself as FBI Director to be had. Sidenote: I listened to the audiobook version which is oddly split between 3 narrators, the central voice being Will Patton during the investigation and trial phase. I probably have listened to too many Stephen King novels narrated by Patton, because his voice seemed too creepy for the role i.e. he was sounding too much like the Brady Hartsfield voice in the Bill Hodges Trilogy.

Frequent mentions

1-5 of 66 reviews
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

Great read

Verified purchase

A very good read. At first thought the book started out slow but as I continue to read it I was fascinated by the story and amazed that this happened. Would recommend this book to anyone especially if they enjoy history.

Helpful?
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

Excellent read.. realistic history

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Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

David Grann is a pheno...

David Grann is a phenomenal researcher and writer. He goes way beyond the 'Just the Facts' and digs into his story and covers it thoroughly. While the story is not pleasant, it is on target and he does not get lost in going off on other directions like some other writers. He lays bare a moment in the history of the United States that was not nice. Kudos to Mr. Grann.

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Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

This was a very good b...

This was a very good book. I had not heard of anything that had happened in this book. I even asked my roommate who grew up in Oklahoma if he had heard of any of this and he had not. I would think that some mention of this would be included in the Oklahoma history books, but I am wrong. This was undoubtedly one of the most shaming book of American history I have ever read. And all of this was done for money. Sickening. I found this book to be very interesting and there were not many pages that I glossed over. Usually in a book like this, there are a few pages that I will do that, not in this one. You can certainly tell that there was a lot of research that was done while writing this book. And the writing also told a story. It wasn't just a bunch of information just thrown in there. I also could not believe the follow-up after the FBI left when there was proof that it just wasn't all Hale's doing. He was bad enough, but all the others? Sad. I also liked reading about the FBI part of it as well. Especially the parts where Hoover is concerned. I will hold off on calling him the names I am thinking. An interesting, very informative, sad, unbelievable, and just downright head shaking read. If your into history or just trivia, this is a book you need to read. Thanks Doubleday Books for approving my request and to Net Galley for providing me with a free e-galley in exchange for an honest review.

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Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

Interesting book on an...

Interesting book on an event that is never taught in school. I especially liked when the investigation is taken over by the FBI. I was appalled by the murders. The Osage were intelligent when negotiating with the government and got the mineral rights to their lands. White man greed once again destroys lives and the Osage community because of oil. I also liked the last part as the reporter is going over the story and discovers that the four years of terror started long before those years and lasted longer with many more men and women who should have been arrested and prosecuted. Mr. Grann put a human face to the people whose lives were affected and the actions of those who were to protect the Osage cannot be justified. Shameful! A good read.

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