Dawn Metcalf

Twixt: Indelible (Paperback)

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Some things are permanent.
Indelible.
And they cannot be changed back.

Joy Malone learns this the night she sees a stranger with all-black eyes across a crowded room--right before the mystery boy tries to cut out her eye.

Instead, the wound accidentally marks her as property of Indelible Ink, and this dangerous mistake thrusts Joy into an incomprehensible world--a world of monsters at the window, glowing girls on the doorstep and a life that will never be the same.

Now, Joy must pretend to be Ink's chosen one--his helper, his love, his something for the foreseeable future...and failure to be convincing means a painful death for them both.

Swept into a world of monsters, illusion, immortal honor and revenge, Joy discovers that sometimes, there are no mistakes.

Somewhere between reality and myth lies...

Specifications

Series Title
Twixt
Publisher
Harlequin
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
378
Author
Dawn Metcalf
Title
Indelible
ISBN-13
9780373210732
Publication Date
July, 2013
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
9.00 x 6.00 x 1.50 Inches
ISBN-10
0373210736

Customer Reviews

Average Rating:(2.7)out of 5 stars
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Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars
NOTE: I received the e...
NOTE: I received the eARC from the publisher via Netgalley. ThanksI have to say that I actually enjoyed Indelible a lot. At times it moved way too slow for my preferences, but I'm going to overlook that.I did like the new twist to the idea of the Fair Folk. I mean, in all the books I've read so far, the fairies are always extremely beautiful, mesmerizing and evil. They never have good intentions and will always act selfishly.Not so here.In the world of Indelible, rarely is a fairy looking anywhere close to resembling the humans. Most look grotesque - like a merge of several creatures. Of course, there are a handful of fair maiden warriors who look stunningly gorgeous, but this seems to be rather the exception, not the norm.Our main fairy characters here are two personals, namely Indelible Ink and his 'sister' Invisible Inq. They're made entirely of ink and the sole purpose of their existence is marking up the humans with the sigils of the fey. As in, ensuring that humans will continue believing in the Fair Folk, thus ensuring the survival of said faery creatures.As you can see, this is an entirely new concept here. But somehow I'm failing to understand how a person (or whatever Ink and Inq are, really) made entirely out of ink could experience any semblance of thoughts, feelings, etc. And, what bothers me the most is that it isn't explained. Since I'm not one of those people who take any information as a given, I can't just pass over this, as if it wasn't an issue. It is, and I need answers. I must say however that besides this fallout, the story was quite nice. It had a nice flow, depth to the world building and characters. It did remind me of City of Bones in the first chapter, but then the resemblance was gone and I was left reading an entirely new idea, which I really enjoyed.So, the lead female, Joy, won me over even though it took her some time. What I particularly liked about her was that she rarely acted stupid. She asked the right questions and didn't stop until a satisfactory enough answer was provided. Of course, there was something special about her that made even that stone hard Indelible Ink notice her and mark her as his own (even if it were an accident).Undoubtedly, that single action of his was where the story began. From then on until the end it was a whirlwind of secrets, impossible visions, curses, adventure, war and of course, the sweetest romance. Ink was such an inexperienced, innocent boy, I believe our world needs more like him.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
Its books like INDELI...
It's books like INDELIBLE that have made me step away from young adult, as a genre.How many times can you tell the same story? Hit the same emotional beats? It's boring. Not just boring. Cheap. Lazy. Insulting.The heroine of INDELIBLE, Joy, is a damsel in distress. She is kidnapped FOUR TIMES over the course of this one book. FOUR. She's an ordinary girl caught up in an extraordinary world and even though her motto is "be indispensable" (which, by the way, has a sort of creepy, wormy ring to it, the way that Joy invokes it--she justifies a lot of questionable behavior by deciding it's time to "be indispensable"), mostly Joy is a pawn whose primary role is to call forth her fairy boyfriend so that he can save the day. And Joy herself...In a field of unlikable YA heroines, she might be the worst. When her best friend wants to talk about her problems, Joy "pretends to listen". When her dad reaches out, Joy heaves a sigh and suffers through it. When her brother needs her to step up, Joy whines about how hard it is. She's really short on empathy. I appreciate that this is a book where our heroine has actual female friends who treat her right, but man, I would have rather read about the friends. There are some nice aspects to INDELIBLE. The writing is smooth, polished, at times beautiful (at others over-processed). The world offers a neat twist on fairy lore, where fairies have found a way link themselves to humans without giving away their precious True Names. The fairy boyfriend, Ink, is one of the people who can forge these safety-added bonds. And the plot, which STARTS--I repeat, STARTS--at about the halfway mark, could have been interesting, if it hadn't been strangled by the vine by the romance.Because INDELIBLE is really just another book about an ordinary girl who's singled out for love by an impossibly ancient yet also cute and teenaged-looking boy. He's never felt this way before, and neither has she, and she's so special and wonderful even though her role in the book is to suffer through a lot of kidnappings and other assorted violence.The story INDELIBLE tells, the romance that overwhelms the plot, is so stale. So lifeless. So shallow. And I've had enough.
Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars
NOTE: I received the e...
NOTE: I received the eARC from the publisher via Netgalley. ThanksI have to say that I actually enjoyed Indelible a lot. At times it moved way too slow for my preferences, but I'm going to overlook that.I did like the new twist to the idea of the Fair Folk. I mean, in all the books I've read so far, the fairies are always extremely beautiful, mesmerizing and evil. They never have good intentions and will always act selfishly.Not so here.In the world of Indelible, rarely is a fairy looking anywhere close to resembling the humans. Most look grotesque - like a merge of several creatures. Of course, there are a handful of fair maiden warriors who look stunningly gorgeous, but this seems to be rather the exception, not the norm.Our main fairy characters here are two personals, namely Indelible Ink and his 'sister' Invisible Inq. They're made entirely of ink and the sole purpose of their existence is marking up the humans with the sigils of the fey. As in, ensuring that humans will continue believing in the Fair Folk, thus ensuring the survival of said faery creatures.As you can see, this is an entirely new concept here. But somehow I'm failing to understand how a person (or whatever Ink and Inq are, really) made entirely out of ink could experience any semblance of thoughts, feelings, etc. And, what bothers me the most is that it isn't explained. Since I'm not one of those people who take any information as a given, I can't just pass over this, as if it wasn't an issue. It is, and I need answers. I must say however that besides this fallout, the story was quite nice. It had a nice flow, depth to the world building and characters. It did remind me of City of Bones in the first chapter, but then the resemblance was gone and I was left reading an entirely new idea, which I really enjoyed.So, the lead female, Joy, won me over even though it took her some time. What I particularly liked about her was that she rarely acted stupid. She asked the right questions and didn't stop until a satisfactory enough answer was provided. Of course, there was something special about her that made even that stone hard Indelible Ink notice her and mark her as his own (even if it were an accident).Undoubtedly, that single action of his was where the story began. From then on until the end it was a whirlwind of secrets, impossible visions, curses, adventure, war and of course, the sweetest romance. Ink was such an inexperienced, innocent boy, I believe our world needs more like him.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
Its books like INDELI...
It's books like INDELIBLE that have made me step away from young adult, as a genre.How many times can you tell the same story? Hit the same emotional beats? It's boring. Not just boring. Cheap. Lazy. Insulting.The heroine of INDELIBLE, Joy, is a damsel in distress. She is kidnapped FOUR TIMES over the course of this one book. FOUR. She's an ordinary girl caught up in an extraordinary world and even though her motto is "be indispensable" (which, by the way, has a sort of creepy, wormy ring to it, the way that Joy invokes it--she justifies a lot of questionable behavior by deciding it's time to "be indispensable"), mostly Joy is a pawn whose primary role is to call forth her fairy boyfriend so that he can save the day. And Joy herself...In a field of unlikable YA heroines, she might be the worst. When her best friend wants to talk about her problems, Joy "pretends to listen". When her dad reaches out, Joy heaves a sigh and suffers through it. When her brother needs her to step up, Joy whines about how hard it is. She's really short on empathy. I appreciate that this is a book where our heroine has actual female friends who treat her right, but man, I would have rather read about the friends. There are some nice aspects to INDELIBLE. The writing is smooth, polished, at times beautiful (at others over-processed). The world offers a neat twist on fairy lore, where fairies have found a way link themselves to humans without giving away their precious True Names. The fairy boyfriend, Ink, is one of the people who can forge these safety-added bonds. And the plot, which STARTS--I repeat, STARTS--at about the halfway mark, could have been interesting, if it hadn't been strangled by the vine by the romance.Because INDELIBLE is really just another book about an ordinary girl who's singled out for love by an impossibly ancient yet also cute and teenaged-looking boy. He's never felt this way before, and neither has she, and she's so special and wonderful even though her role in the book is to suffer through a lot of kidnappings and other assorted violence.The story INDELIBLE tells, the romance that overwhelms the plot, is so stale. So lifeless. So shallow. And I've had enough.
NOTE: I received the eARC from the publisher via Netgalley. ThanksI have to say that I actually enjoyed Indelible a lot. At times it moved way too slow for my preferences, but I'm going to overlook that.I did like the new twist to the idea of the Fair Folk. I mean, in all the books I've read so far, the fairies are always extremely beautiful, mesmerizing and evil. They never have good intentions and will always act selfishly.Not so here.In the world of Indelible, rarely is a fairy looking anywhere close to resembling the humans. Most look grotesque - like a merge of several creatures. Of course, there are a handful of fair maiden warriors who look stunningly gorgeous, but this seems to be rather the exception, not the norm.Our main fairy characters here are two personals, namely Indelible Ink and his 'sister' Invisible Inq. They're made entirely of ink and the sole purpose of their existence is marking up the humans with the sigils of the fey. As in, ensuring that humans will continue believing in the Fair Folk, thus ensuring the survival of said faery creatures.As you can see, this is an entirely new concept here. But somehow I'm failing to understand how a person (or whatever Ink and Inq are, really) made entirely out of ink could experience any semblance of thoughts, feelings, etc. And, what bothers me the most is that it isn't explained. Since I'm not one of those people who take any information as a given, I can't just pass over this, as if it wasn't an issue. It is, and I need answers. I must say however that besides this fallout, the story was quite nice. It had a nice flow, depth to the world building and characters. It did remind me of City of Bones in the first chapter, but then the resemblance was gone and I was left reading an entirely new idea, which I really enjoyed.So, the lead female, Joy, won me over even though it took her some time. What I particularly liked about her was that she rarely acted stupid. She asked the right questions and didn't stop until a satisfactory enough answer was provided. Of course, there was something special about her that made even that stone hard Indelible Ink notice her and mark her as his own (even if it were an accident).Undoubtedly, that single action of his was where the story began. From then on until the end it was a whirlwind of secrets, impossible visions, curses, adventure, war and of course, the sweetest romance. Ink was such an inexperienced, innocent boy, I believe our world needs more like him.
It's books like INDELIBLE that have made me step away from young adult, as a genre.How many times can you tell the same story? Hit the same emotional beats? It's boring. Not just boring. Cheap. Lazy. Insulting.The heroine of INDELIBLE, Joy, is a damsel in distress. She is kidnapped FOUR TIMES over the course of this one book. FOUR. She's an ordinary girl caught up in an extraordinary world and even though her motto is "be indispensable" (which, by the way, has a sort of creepy, wormy ring to it, the way that Joy invokes it--she justifies a lot of questionable behavior by deciding it's time to "be indispensable"), mostly Joy is a pawn whose primary role is to call forth her fairy boyfriend so that he can save the day. And Joy herself...In a field of unlikable YA heroines, she might be the worst. When her best friend wants to talk about her problems, Joy "pretends to listen". When her dad reaches out, Joy heaves a sigh and suffers through it. When her brother needs her to step up, Joy whines about how hard it is. She's really short on empathy. I appreciate that this is a book where our heroine has actual female friends who treat her right, but man, I would have rather read about the friends. There are some nice aspects to INDELIBLE. The writing is smooth, polished, at times beautiful (at others over-processed). The world offers a neat twist on fairy lore, where fairies have found a way link themselves to humans without giving away their precious True Names. The fairy boyfriend, Ink, is one of the people who can forge these safety-added bonds. And the plot, which STARTS--I repeat, STARTS--at about the halfway mark, could have been interesting, if it hadn't been strangled by the vine by the romance.Because INDELIBLE is really just another book about an ordinary girl who's singled out for love by an impossibly ancient yet also cute and teenaged-looking boy. He's never felt this way before, and neither has she, and she's so special and wonderful even though her role in the book is to suffer through a lot of kidnappings and other assorted violence.The story INDELIBLE tells, the romance that overwhelms the plot, is so stale. So lifeless. So shallow. And I've had enough.

Frequent mentions

1-5 of 7 reviews
Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

NOTE: I received the e...

NOTE: I received the eARC from the publisher via Netgalley. ThanksI have to say that I actually enjoyed Indelible a lot. At times it moved way too slow for my preferences, but I'm going to overlook that.I did like the new twist to the idea of the Fair Folk. I mean, in all the books I've read so far, the fairies are always extremely beautiful, mesmerizing and evil. They never have good intentions and will always act selfishly.Not so here.In the world of Indelible, rarely is a fairy looking anywhere close to resembling the humans. Most look grotesque - like a merge of several creatures. Of course, there are a handful of fair maiden warriors who look stunningly gorgeous, but this seems to be rather the exception, not the norm.Our main fairy characters here are two personals, namely Indelible Ink and his 'sister' Invisible Inq. They're made entirely of ink and the sole purpose of their existence is marking up the humans with the sigils of the fey. As in, ensuring that humans will continue believing in the Fair Folk, thus ensuring the survival of said faery creatures.As you can see, this is an entirely new concept here. But somehow I'm failing to understand how a person (or whatever Ink and Inq are, really) made entirely out of ink could experience any semblance of thoughts, feelings, etc. And, what bothers me the most is that it isn't explained. Since I'm not one of those people who take any information as a given, I can't just pass over this, as if it wasn't an issue. It is, and I need answers. I must say however that besides this fallout, the story was quite nice. It had a nice flow, depth to the world building and characters. It did remind me of City of Bones in the first chapter, but then the resemblance was gone and I was left reading an entirely new idea, which I really enjoyed.So, the lead female, Joy, won me over even though it took her some time. What I particularly liked about her was that she rarely acted stupid. She asked the right questions and didn't stop until a satisfactory enough answer was provided. Of course, there was something special about her that made even that stone hard Indelible Ink notice her and mark her as his own (even if it were an accident).Undoubtedly, that single action of his was where the story began. From then on until the end it was a whirlwind of secrets, impossible visions, curses, adventure, war and of course, the sweetest romance. Ink was such an inexperienced, innocent boy, I believe our world needs more like him.

Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

Review courtesy of All...

Review courtesy of All Things Urban Fantasy allthingsuf.com INDELIBLE starts off with a vivid flourish, claiming old fairy anew. I was quickly enthralled with the story, both for Joy and Ink and their fragile association, and the way Metcalf fearlessly began remaking all of magic and myth and folk into something modern, without losing any of their original wildness and danger. In addition to a fantastic mythology of fairy, Metcalf has written an enjoyable romance. Trying to establish a love affair between a teenager and an immortal being can be problematic, to say the least. INDELIBLE does a wonderful job not glossing over the growing pains. Panic, intrigue, and Ink's undeniably alien nature all get as much page time as any nascent romance. But underneath that fey nature is an undeniable spark, and as Joy and Ink get to know each other better their attraction takes on a greater emotional weight. The scenes where Ink traces Joy's ear, learns her hands, are both romantic and magical. But as much as I adored Ink's fragile humanity, by the last third of the story INDELIBLE's initial momentum began to falter under politics and faction, power structures and committees that I never quite grasped. While I loved Ink and Inq, and the riveting characters that shared their world, the plot itself never made enough sense to create high stakes. There was a villain, there was a threat, there were battles... but all the build up and plotting never quite clicked. INDELIBLE is a vivid, trippy glimpse behind the veil into fairy, and fans of Holly Black and Melissa Marr will enjoy this world. Though the plot got away from me, the main characters were riveting to the end. Sexual Content: References to sex, kissing.

Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

Review courtesy of Dar...

Review courtesy of Dark Faerie Tales. Quick & Dirty: This had a very unique and different premise. I really enjoyed the book as a whole, but the pacing wasn't the best and I wasn't a huge fan of the characters. Opening Sentence: The music beat hard against Joy's ribs. The Review: Joy Malone is 16 years old and in the last year her life fell apart. Her mom left and moved to L.A. to live with a younger guy. Joy gave up on her dream to become an Olympic gymnast, and her brother left for college. She now lives with her dad and she gets pretty lonely at times. One night her best friend convinces her to go to a dance club, and Joy's life is changed forever. A mysterious boy with all black eyes tries to cut out her eyes, but he doesn't succeed. Instead he ends up leaving her with his signature mark. Ink is a creature from The Twixt. The Twixt is another dimension filled with magical creatures and there is a delicate balance that must be maintained between the two worlds. The creatures from The Twixt mark humans as their property and are therefore responsible for them. Ink and his sister Inq are in charge of marking the humans for the creatures. It turns out that Joy has something called "The Sight" where she is able to see the creatures and Ink was trying to protect her by taking her eyes, but he missed. Now that she bears Ink's mark she has to prove to all the creatures that her and Ink are lovers, because Ink isn't allowed to make mistakes. If they can't prove that Joy's mark was intentional then they could both forfeit their lives. Joy is our heroine in the story and I had mixed feelings about her. She has a really whiny voice at parts in the book and her bad attitude got on my nerves. She kept feeling bad for herself and I felt that in that aspect she never really got any better. Now with that being said, there were things that I really liked about her as well. She is sweet, caring, loyal, and independent. She is pretty good at taking care of herself, but not too stubborn to ask for help if she needs it. For me, I would have to say that she was just a middle of the road character for me. I really wanted to love her, but she was just a little too irritating for me. Ink is a very interesting character. He has the image of a human, but he is missing things like finger nails and a belly button. For me he was a very hard character to connect to, he hasn't had a lot of interaction with humans before so everything with Joy is new. The problem is that because he is not human he doesn't have certain characteristics that come naturally to humans. I realize that is what the author was going for when she created him but instead of it helping me to understand him better, it made me not like him as much. He is the love interest in the book and I really wanted to swoon over him, but I just couldn't. Now I know that this review has sounded pretty negative so far, but to be honest, I actually did like the book. The plot was fun and intriguing and it kept me interested the whole way through. The idea was very unique and different than anything else I have ever read. The romance was actually very sweet and well developed. I love the cover, it is very captivating and fits the book perfectly. The pacing was a little off for me; there were scenes that really seemed to drag and others that I would have liked more detail. I think that would have helped it flow better. So yes, there were some parts that were disappointing, but overall I still thought it was a fun read. I do look forward to the next book in the story and I hope that some of the things I didn't like about this one will be different in the next installment. I would recommend this to fans of YA Fantasy. I think it would be an enjoyable read for you. Notable Scene: Turning around, Joy squinted. The sky outside was a patchwork of blue-orange low-glow. The wind was blowing through the backyard. She could hear it whistling outside. Maybe a branch was scraping the glass? There was a long, drawn-out scrrrrrrrrrrrick! A large shadow with glowing eyes loomed in the dark. The eyes were shaped like arrowheads and fiery, electric white. Joy stumbled. The eyes slanted in amusement. There was a scratch at the glass again. Joy's back hit the wall, her whole body tingling. The kitchen phone was still on the couch, impossibly far away. So was her voice. So was her breath. She stared, quivering. A large palm pressed flat against the glass, thick fingers ending in points. There were only four of them. The hand flexed and dropped into darkness, but the eyes were still there, burning. Joy blinked her one eye over and over, gripping the edge of the sliding closet door. She couldn't be seeing what she was seeing. She wanted to hide behind the coats, but she didn't dare let the thing out of her sight. If it didn't stay where she could see it, it could be anywhere. Wake up, she told herself. Wake up, Joy! The eyes narrowed. The claw reappeared and thumped dully against the glass. Once. Twice. FTC Advisory: Harlequin Teen provided me with a copy of Indelible. No goody bags, sponsorships, "material connections," or bribes were exchanged for my review.

Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

If youve followed my ...

If you've followed my blog for awhile, you will know that this is my first review about a book with fairies. I don't normally like fairies, but I saw the cover for this one and decided I wanted to read it... (Yes I know its a bad habit lol) But overall, it wasn't a terrible read. There were some things I was annoyed at, but it wasn't bad enough for me to swear off the rest of the series. One thing I was a little unnerved about was the use of unnecessary facts. I call that "fluff." They are fillers to make the book longer. For example, "She got up, wincing around an old injury of two broken toes..." I just didn't see the relevance to the rest of the story. It was just something I could do without. Now if that were the only time, I would have been ok with that, but it was throughout the ENTIRE story. Another thing I didn't like was the choppy writing style. I'm not sure if it was because this was an e-ARC or what, but there weren't any chapter markers and it was driving me insane. I was confused whenever they jumped from subject to subject. I felt like it was just all over the place. It was a lot to process. What I did like was the way it jumped right into the action. There was honestly never a dull moment in the book. It kept me going and worried about what would happen next. I just wish the creepy parts were a bit more creepy. Overall, I'm happy I decided to pick up this book. It really opened up my world to a different genre. But there were some things I wish I could change.

Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars

Its books like INDELI...

It's books like INDELIBLE that have made me step away from young adult, as a genre.How many times can you tell the same story? Hit the same emotional beats? It's boring. Not just boring. Cheap. Lazy. Insulting.The heroine of INDELIBLE, Joy, is a damsel in distress. She is kidnapped FOUR TIMES over the course of this one book. FOUR. She's an ordinary girl caught up in an extraordinary world and even though her motto is "be indispensable" (which, by the way, has a sort of creepy, wormy ring to it, the way that Joy invokes it--she justifies a lot of questionable behavior by deciding it's time to "be indispensable"), mostly Joy is a pawn whose primary role is to call forth her fairy boyfriend so that he can save the day. And Joy herself...In a field of unlikable YA heroines, she might be the worst. When her best friend wants to talk about her problems, Joy "pretends to listen". When her dad reaches out, Joy heaves a sigh and suffers through it. When her brother needs her to step up, Joy whines about how hard it is. She's really short on empathy. I appreciate that this is a book where our heroine has actual female friends who treat her right, but man, I would have rather read about the friends. There are some nice aspects to INDELIBLE. The writing is smooth, polished, at times beautiful (at others over-processed). The world offers a neat twist on fairy lore, where fairies have found a way link themselves to humans without giving away their precious True Names. The fairy boyfriend, Ink, is one of the people who can forge these safety-added bonds. And the plot, which STARTS--I repeat, STARTS--at about the halfway mark, could have been interesting, if it hadn't been strangled by the vine by the romance.Because INDELIBLE is really just another book about an ordinary girl who's singled out for love by an impossibly ancient yet also cute and teenaged-looking boy. He's never felt this way before, and neither has she, and she's so special and wonderful even though her role in the book is to suffer through a lot of kidnappings and other assorted violence.The story INDELIBLE tells, the romance that overwhelms the plot, is so stale. So lifeless. So shallow. And I've had enough.


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