Dale Carnegie

How to Win Friends & Influence People (Miniature Edition) : The Only Book You Need to Lead You to Success

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<strong>A Running Press mini abridgement of the most groundbreaking guidebook of all time.</strong> Dale Carnegie's rock-solid, time-tested advice has carried countless people up the ladder of success in their business and personal lives. Now for the first time, the groundbreaking guidebook is available in our Miniature Edition format, for a quick dose of on-the-go inspiration. Fans of the original book as well as those looking for a little life-changing advice will enjoy this mini abridged edition of the classic work.

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A Running Press mini abridgement of the most groundbreaking guidebook of all time. Dale Carnegie's rock-solid, time-tested advice has carried countless people up the ladder of success in their business and personal lives. Now for the first time, the groundbreaking guidebook is available in our Miniature Edition format, for a quick dose of on-the-go inspiration. Fans of the original book as well as those looking for a little life-changing advice will enjoy this mini abridged edition of the classic work.A Running Press mini abridgement of the most groundbreaking guidebook of all time.

Dale Carnegie's rock-solid, time-tested advice has carried countless people up the ladder of success in their business and personal lives. Now for the first time, the groundbreaking guidebook is available in our Miniature Edition format, for a quick dose of on-the-go inspiration. Fans of the original book as well as those looking for a little life-changing advice will enjoy this mini abridged edition of the classic work.

Specifications

Abridged
Y
Series Title
RP Minis
Publisher
Running Press
Book Format
Hardcover
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
136
Author
Dale Carnegie
Title
How to Win Friends & Influence People (Miniature Edition)
ISBN-13
9780762462018
Publication Date
April, 2017
ISBN-10
0762462019

Customer Reviews

Average Rating:(4.5)out of 5 stars
5 stars
36
4 stars
14
3 stars
4
2 stars
1
1 star
1
Most helpful positive review
2 customers found this helpful
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
In general, I do not r...
In general, I do not read self-help books. I find them preachy and uninspiring. This book, however, was highly recommended by a blogger whose post convinced me to give it a shot. I'm glad I did. Though the principles are probably common sense (motivate through praise rather than criticism, listen without interrupting, smile, make the other person feel important, etc.), I believe it did me some good to hear them all laid out in such a straightforward manner. Everybody else on the planet is just as self-absorbed as I am, and they care far more about what they want than what I want. Each chapter began with a principle, described it a little in general, then listed anecdote after anecdote about the principle in action. Most telling to me was the repeated assurance that these techniques only work if the feeling behind them in genuine, not manipulative. People can see through flattery. This book was first published in 1936, and we certainly have not become a more genteel society since then. I wonder what Carnegie would think of the internet and its trolls. For much of the book I could imagine people hearing the advice and thinking, "Yes! This is how other people should treat me!" But of course that's not the point. The point is that if you treat other people this way, you will benefit. Sometimes this will be through convincing people to come around to your way of thinking, but more often just by spreading good will. Had this book been written a few decades later, I'm sure karma would have been mentioned more than once. Though a couple of the techniques described might come off as passive-aggressive today, by and large it's a good resource - a good reminder for how to deal with other people, to give and receive criticism gracefully, and generally improve your attitude. I hereby recommend it to everyone on the planet. In return, I will attempt to practice its principles in my own life more often. I can't promise I'll always be successful - three decades of acerbity do not disappear overnight, after all - but I can try.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
A fairly typical self-...
A fairly typical self-help tome. Nicely written for easy consumption with an endless stream of practical examples. Suffers a little from too many rules which at times are raced through, leading at the end to a sense of difficulty in holding the advice in mind.However, the author intends it to be an ongoing learning exercise rather than enlightenment after a single read.
Most helpful positive review
2 customers found this helpful
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
In general, I do not r...
In general, I do not read self-help books. I find them preachy and uninspiring. This book, however, was highly recommended by a blogger whose post convinced me to give it a shot. I'm glad I did. Though the principles are probably common sense (motivate through praise rather than criticism, listen without interrupting, smile, make the other person feel important, etc.), I believe it did me some good to hear them all laid out in such a straightforward manner. Everybody else on the planet is just as self-absorbed as I am, and they care far more about what they want than what I want. Each chapter began with a principle, described it a little in general, then listed anecdote after anecdote about the principle in action. Most telling to me was the repeated assurance that these techniques only work if the feeling behind them in genuine, not manipulative. People can see through flattery. This book was first published in 1936, and we certainly have not become a more genteel society since then. I wonder what Carnegie would think of the internet and its trolls. For much of the book I could imagine people hearing the advice and thinking, "Yes! This is how other people should treat me!" But of course that's not the point. The point is that if you treat other people this way, you will benefit. Sometimes this will be through convincing people to come around to your way of thinking, but more often just by spreading good will. Had this book been written a few decades later, I'm sure karma would have been mentioned more than once. Though a couple of the techniques described might come off as passive-aggressive today, by and large it's a good resource - a good reminder for how to deal with other people, to give and receive criticism gracefully, and generally improve your attitude. I hereby recommend it to everyone on the planet. In return, I will attempt to practice its principles in my own life more often. I can't promise I'll always be successful - three decades of acerbity do not disappear overnight, after all - but I can try.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
A fairly typical self-...
A fairly typical self-help tome. Nicely written for easy consumption with an endless stream of practical examples. Suffers a little from too many rules which at times are raced through, leading at the end to a sense of difficulty in holding the advice in mind.However, the author intends it to be an ongoing learning exercise rather than enlightenment after a single read.
In general, I do not read self-help books. I find them preachy and uninspiring. This book, however, was highly recommended by a blogger whose post convinced me to give it a shot. I'm glad I did. Though the principles are probably common sense (motivate through praise rather than criticism, listen without interrupting, smile, make the other person feel important, etc.), I believe it did me some good to hear them all laid out in such a straightforward manner. Everybody else on the planet is just as self-absorbed as I am, and they care far more about what they want than what I want. Each chapter began with a principle, described it a little in general, then listed anecdote after anecdote about the principle in action. Most telling to me was the repeated assurance that these techniques only work if the feeling behind them in genuine, not manipulative. People can see through flattery. This book was first published in 1936, and we certainly have not become a more genteel society since then. I wonder what Carnegie would think of the internet and its trolls. For much of the book I could imagine people hearing the advice and thinking, "Yes! This is how other people should treat me!" But of course that's not the point. The point is that if you treat other people this way, you will benefit. Sometimes this will be through convincing people to come around to your way of thinking, but more often just by spreading good will. Had this book been written a few decades later, I'm sure karma would have been mentioned more than once. Though a couple of the techniques described might come off as passive-aggressive today, by and large it's a good resource - a good reminder for how to deal with other people, to give and receive criticism gracefully, and generally improve your attitude. I hereby recommend it to everyone on the planet. In return, I will attempt to practice its principles in my own life more often. I can't promise I'll always be successful - three decades of acerbity do not disappear overnight, after all - but I can try.
A fairly typical self-help tome. Nicely written for easy consumption with an endless stream of practical examples. Suffers a little from too many rules which at times are raced through, leading at the end to a sense of difficulty in holding the advice in mind.However, the author intends it to be an ongoing learning exercise rather than enlightenment after a single read.

Frequent mentions

1-5 of 56 reviews
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

In general, I do not r...

In general, I do not read self-help books. I find them preachy and uninspiring. This book, however, was highly recommended by a blogger whose post convinced me to give it a shot. I'm glad I did. Though the principles are probably common sense (motivate through praise rather than criticism, listen without interrupting, smile, make the other person feel important, etc.), I believe it did me some good to hear them all laid out in such a straightforward manner. Everybody else on the planet is just as self-absorbed as I am, and they care far more about what they want than what I want. Each chapter began with a principle, described it a little in general, then listed anecdote after anecdote about the principle in action. Most telling to me was the repeated assurance that these techniques only work if the feeling behind them in genuine, not manipulative. People can see through flattery. This book was first published in 1936, and we certainly have not become a more genteel society since then. I wonder what Carnegie would think of the internet and its trolls. For much of the book I could imagine people hearing the advice and thinking, "Yes! This is how other people should treat me!" But of course that's not the point. The point is that if you treat other people this way, you will benefit. Sometimes this will be through convincing people to come around to your way of thinking, but more often just by spreading good will. Had this book been written a few decades later, I'm sure karma would have been mentioned more than once. Though a couple of the techniques described might come off as passive-aggressive today, by and large it's a good resource - a good reminder for how to deal with other people, to give and receive criticism gracefully, and generally improve your attitude. I hereby recommend it to everyone on the planet. In return, I will attempt to practice its principles in my own life more often. I can't promise I'll always be successful - three decades of acerbity do not disappear overnight, after all - but I can try.

Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

In general, I do not r...

In general, I do not read self-help books. I find them preachy and uninspiring. This book, however, was highly recommended by a blogger whose post convinced me to give it a shot. I'm glad I did. Though the principles are probably common sense (motivate through praise rather than criticism, listen without interrupting, smile, make the other person feel important, etc.), I believe it did me some good to hear them all laid out in such a straightforward manner. Everybody else on the planet is just as self-absorbed as I am, and they care far more about what they want than what I want. Each chapter began with a principle, described it a little in general, then listed anecdote after anecdote about the principle in action. Most telling to me was the repeated assurance that these techniques only work if the feeling behind them in genuine, not manipulative. People can see through flattery. This book was first published in 1936, and we certainly have not become a more genteel society since then. I wonder what Carnegie would think of the internet and its trolls. For much of the book I could imagine people hearing the advice and thinking, "Yes! This is how other people should treat me!" But of course that's not the point. The point is that if you treat other people this way, you will benefit. Sometimes this will be through convincing people to come around to your way of thinking, but more often just by spreading good will. Had this book been written a few decades later, I'm sure karma would have been mentioned more than once. Though a couple of the techniques described might come off as passive-aggressive today, by and large it's a good resource - a good reminder for how to deal with other people, to give and receive criticism gracefully, and generally improve your attitude. I hereby recommend it to everyone on the planet. In return, I will attempt to practice its principles in my own life more often. I can't promise I'll always be successful - three decades of acerbity do not disappear overnight, after all - but I can try.

Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

This is such a classic...

This is such a classic. While most of the examples may seem dated the ideas and the lessons are not. In fact, given our current fast paced digital world, this book may be of more importance now than in any other time in history.If it's been a while since you've read it, or if you've never read it, I highly recommend giving it a read.

Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

This is one of those b...

This is one of those books where you know every section like the back of your hand but are compelled to retread once a year just to re-energize yourself for whatever you do. If your in sales or just want to get further in your career this book should be in your library with well worn pages and a cover falling off.

Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

This book is the bests...

This book is the bestseller in many country with How to stop worrying and start living.In this book,it is written relationship with the other people.I think it's useful in every situation.But English level is high with" How to stop worrying and start living" You need to read many times.


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