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Electrode, Comp-719539878, DC-prod-az-southcentralus-13, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-19.1.31, SHA-771c9ce79737366b1d5f53d21cad4086bf722e21, CID-e2455446-ab7-16e92956b0a0a0, Generated: Fri, 22 Nov 2019 10:08:16 GMT

High School Prom : Marketing, Morals and the American Teen

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"This volume examines the evolution of prom, the development of the billion-dollar prom industry, and prom's place in popular culture, including its portrayal in film, television, and literature. Using prom as a lens through which to view many aspects of American culture, this work offers fresh perspective on the history of American youth"--Provided by publisher.

Customer Review Snapshot

3 out of 5 stars
6 total reviews
5 stars
1
4 stars
0
3 stars
3
2 stars
2
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
I love reading about how the social traditions in America have developed and changed and this book definitely showcases a fascinating aspect of American culture, the teen years. High School Prom not only discusses the advent and development of proms but also of the advent and development of the teenager. Many kids of today (and adults too) would find it a surprise that life had ever existed without teenagers. But way back when the teen years were times of hard work not of education and free time. And when the "teenager" did come into being it wasn't anything like what kids these days know. Proms have played an important part in the high school landscape, but the seem to be lessening in importance as the American traditions are dying out in favor of technology. I'd be fascinated to see this book re-written in 20 years as an homage to a teen event that no longer exists. If you like history, sociology, economics, or anthropology then this book is for you. Full of fact, figures and history of the American teen and the rite of passage we call PROM it is a great read.

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"This volume examines the evolution of prom, the development of the billion-dollar prom industry, and prom's place in popular culture, including its portrayal in film, television, and literature. Using prom as a lens through which to view many aspects of American culture, this work offers fresh perspective on the history of American youth"--Provided by publisher. High School Prom

Specifications

Publisher
McFarland & Company
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
ENG
Number of Pages
218
Author
Ann Anderson
ISBN-13
9780786467006
Publication Date
August, 2012
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
8.90 x 5.90 x 0.60 Inches
ISBN-10
0786467002

Customer Reviews

5 stars
1
4 stars
0
3 stars
3
2 stars
2
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
I love reading about h...
I love reading about how the social traditions in America have developed and changed and this book definitely showcases a fascinating aspect of American culture, the teen years. High School Prom not only discusses the advent and development of proms but also of the advent and development of the teenager. Many kids of today (and adults too) would find it a surprise that life had ever existed without teenagers. But way back when the teen years were times of hard work not of education and free time. And when the "teenager" did come into being it wasn't anything like what kids these days know. Proms have played an important part in the high school landscape, but the seem to be lessening in importance as the American traditions are dying out in favor of technology. I'd be fascinated to see this book re-written in 20 years as an homage to a teen event that no longer exists. If you like history, sociology, economics, or anthropology then this book is for you. Full of fact, figures and history of the American teen and the rite of passage we call PROM it is a great read.
Most helpful negative review
Ann Andersons High Sc...
Ann Anderson's High School Prom is a perfectly adequate book on its chosen subject: the changing nature, and shifting social meanings, of the titular event. It entertains, informs, and makes a plausible case for the prom as American teens' ritual initiation into adulthood. It is, however, deeply frustrating. The "history" section that opens the book and accounts for 106 of its 188 pages of text opens with a brisk review of the prom's seldom-discussed origins and pre-1945 history. Beginning with the second chapter, however, it loses focus. The emergence of young adulthood as a recognized stage of life and teenagers as a distinct social group; the rise of swing, rock, and other "youth music"; and shifts in courtship and dating rituals all shaped senior proms, but its history is not (simply) their history, writ small. Anderson, unfortunately, too often writes as if it was, presenting rehashed overview of American youth culture and labeling it a history of the senior prom. Her examples of actual prom culture from different decades feel like an afterthought, not the centerpiece they should have been. The remaining sections of the book, on the "prom industry" (46 pages) and the prom in popular culture (23 pages), are better, but far too brief. The "industry" section, which also deals not only with marketing but also with the prom as a stage on which social anxieties about race and sexual orientation are played out, is particularly ill-served by this brevity. Here too, however, Anderson's authorial choices compound the problem. She falls, too often, into sociology-by-anecdote, offering fascinating examples, but failing to put them in any kind of local or comparative context that would give them meaning. High School Prom is a perfectly adequate book. It should, however, have been good-could have been great-and it's not.
Most helpful positive review
I love reading about h...
I love reading about how the social traditions in America have developed and changed and this book definitely showcases a fascinating aspect of American culture, the teen years. High School Prom not only discusses the advent and development of proms but also of the advent and development of the teenager. Many kids of today (and adults too) would find it a surprise that life had ever existed without teenagers. But way back when the teen years were times of hard work not of education and free time. And when the "teenager" did come into being it wasn't anything like what kids these days know. Proms have played an important part in the high school landscape, but the seem to be lessening in importance as the American traditions are dying out in favor of technology. I'd be fascinated to see this book re-written in 20 years as an homage to a teen event that no longer exists. If you like history, sociology, economics, or anthropology then this book is for you. Full of fact, figures and history of the American teen and the rite of passage we call PROM it is a great read.
Most helpful negative review
Ann Andersons High Sc...
Ann Anderson's High School Prom is a perfectly adequate book on its chosen subject: the changing nature, and shifting social meanings, of the titular event. It entertains, informs, and makes a plausible case for the prom as American teens' ritual initiation into adulthood. It is, however, deeply frustrating. The "history" section that opens the book and accounts for 106 of its 188 pages of text opens with a brisk review of the prom's seldom-discussed origins and pre-1945 history. Beginning with the second chapter, however, it loses focus. The emergence of young adulthood as a recognized stage of life and teenagers as a distinct social group; the rise of swing, rock, and other "youth music"; and shifts in courtship and dating rituals all shaped senior proms, but its history is not (simply) their history, writ small. Anderson, unfortunately, too often writes as if it was, presenting rehashed overview of American youth culture and labeling it a history of the senior prom. Her examples of actual prom culture from different decades feel like an afterthought, not the centerpiece they should have been. The remaining sections of the book, on the "prom industry" (46 pages) and the prom in popular culture (23 pages), are better, but far too brief. The "industry" section, which also deals not only with marketing but also with the prom as a stage on which social anxieties about race and sexual orientation are played out, is particularly ill-served by this brevity. Here too, however, Anderson's authorial choices compound the problem. She falls, too often, into sociology-by-anecdote, offering fascinating examples, but failing to put them in any kind of local or comparative context that would give them meaning. High School Prom is a perfectly adequate book. It should, however, have been good-could have been great-and it's not.
1-5 of 6 reviews

I love reading about h...

I love reading about how the social traditions in America have developed and changed and this book definitely showcases a fascinating aspect of American culture, the teen years. High School Prom not only discusses the advent and development of proms but also of the advent and development of the teenager. Many kids of today (and adults too) would find it a surprise that life had ever existed without teenagers. But way back when the teen years were times of hard work not of education and free time. And when the "teenager" did come into being it wasn't anything like what kids these days know. Proms have played an important part in the high school landscape, but the seem to be lessening in importance as the American traditions are dying out in favor of technology. I'd be fascinated to see this book re-written in 20 years as an homage to a teen event that no longer exists. If you like history, sociology, economics, or anthropology then this book is for you. Full of fact, figures and history of the American teen and the rite of passage we call PROM it is a great read.

I was excited to recei...

I was excited to receive this book. As someone interested in sociology, women's studies, teen culture, and social history I expected it to be right up my alley. The book, for the most part, did not disappoint. It contained a lot of great information and observances on all aspects of prom and much of American youth culture. However, it was mostly just fine; it could have been a great book if it had a stronger focus and editorial direction. Overall, I got the impression that Anderson knew a lot of...stuff about prom, but didn't have much of anything to say about it. I don't think ever non-fiction book needs a strong thesis. A book can be an open exploration of a topic and still be good, but in this case I think stronger direction would have vastly improved the text. Still, if you are interested in teen culture, consumerism, or young women in America you will probably enjoy this book.

This book was pretty b...

This book was pretty boring. It seemed pretty random, all over the place and influenced more by her memories and her friends memories than by research. I also would have liked to see more pictures. I went to a girls-only school and did not have a prom, so I have no personal experience of the topic (and no, yeshivas were NOT mentioned when she mentioned American schools that don't do prom).

With a passionate inte...

With a passionate interest in women's studies, mass culture, and all things kitsch (face it, prom is kitsch), I am delighted to report on Anderson's new text High School Prom. Though it isn't lengthy she manages to cover all aspects of its history, commercialism, and pop culture status. Women readers - get ready to self-reflect and men, well, you're mentioned sometimes too. Part I - History - is the most in-depth and, unfortunately, the most tedious. Her writing style is a blend of nostalgic longing and well-researched scholarship. Sometimes it feels as if Anderson's wishful thinking for her own prom do-over is the only reason she invested so much time into this research. However, it pulls through in Parts II and III - Marketing and Prom in Popular Culture, respectively. In these chapters she moves away from memory and writes more analytically about teen magazines, limo companies, and prom-themed B-movies. Though prom is the core of the text, Anderson has to bring in many other elements of girlhood culture to round out her research. The evolution of the teenager as a social class and generational differences are routinely mentioned. The history and development of the magazine Seventeen plays a starring role in marketing and peer pressure issues. And such a strong lure that even Anderson sucumbs to it in her writing, the power of prom nostalgia and innocent romance both work to increase movie box office sales. Anderson's latest work might work better as popular reading and layman's interest than academic research. This is a bit disappointing for more serious readers, but a lengthy bibliography is sure to please these folks (myself included).

Ann Andersons High Sc...

Ann Anderson's High School Prom is a perfectly adequate book on its chosen subject: the changing nature, and shifting social meanings, of the titular event. It entertains, informs, and makes a plausible case for the prom as American teens' ritual initiation into adulthood. It is, however, deeply frustrating. The "history" section that opens the book and accounts for 106 of its 188 pages of text opens with a brisk review of the prom's seldom-discussed origins and pre-1945 history. Beginning with the second chapter, however, it loses focus. The emergence of young adulthood as a recognized stage of life and teenagers as a distinct social group; the rise of swing, rock, and other "youth music"; and shifts in courtship and dating rituals all shaped senior proms, but its history is not (simply) their history, writ small. Anderson, unfortunately, too often writes as if it was, presenting rehashed overview of American youth culture and labeling it a history of the senior prom. Her examples of actual prom culture from different decades feel like an afterthought, not the centerpiece they should have been. The remaining sections of the book, on the "prom industry" (46 pages) and the prom in popular culture (23 pages), are better, but far too brief. The "industry" section, which also deals not only with marketing but also with the prom as a stage on which social anxieties about race and sexual orientation are played out, is particularly ill-served by this brevity. Here too, however, Anderson's authorial choices compound the problem. She falls, too often, into sociology-by-anecdote, offering fascinating examples, but failing to put them in any kind of local or comparative context that would give them meaning. High School Prom is a perfectly adequate book. It should, however, have been good-could have been great-and it's not.

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Electrode, Comp-505166043, DC-prod-az-southcentralus-5, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-30.0.3-ebf-2, SHA-8c8e8dc1c07e462c80c1b82096c2da2858100078, CID-acd7f006-bb2-16e929eb671aef, Generated: Fri, 22 Nov 2019 10:18:25 GMT