Patricia Ottaviano

Girl World

Average Rating:out of 5 stars
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Walmart # 559217920
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With practical advice for how to fearlessly stand your ground, hold your own, and dictate your own happiness, Girl World will help you move beyond the bad attitudes and transform your insecurities into strengths.

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With practical advice for how to fearlessly stand your ground, hold your own, and dictate your own happiness, Girl World will help you move beyond the bad attitudes and transform your insecurities into strengths.

Mean stares. Hurtful whispers. The cold shoulder. Being a girl is harder than it looks. In a world where gossip, drama, and rumors seem to be never ending, it's not easy to navigate the halls of middle school or high school without earning a few battle scars.

But what if you could change all that? With practical advice for how to fearlessly stand your ground, hold your own, and dictate your own happiness, Girl World will help you move beyond the bad attitudes and transform your insecurities into strengths. From friendship conflicts to the ugly side to social media, learn how to ditch the drama and kick your inner critic to the curb so you can truly start appreciating yourself.

Every day is a new day. Embrace it!

Specifications

Publisher
Sourcebooks
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
160
Author
Patricia Ottaviano
Title
Girl World
ISBN-13
9781492609124
Publication Date
08/04/2015
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
8.90 x 5.90 x 0.60 Inches
ISBN-10
1492609129

Customer Reviews

Average Rating:(3.8)out of 5 stars
5 stars
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Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars
I really enjoyed The G...
I really enjoyed The Girl from the Well and was excited to see that there was going to be a sequel to that book. I got a copy of this book to review from NetGalley. This ended up being a very well done and creepy ghost story with a lot of Japanese mythology throughout. I enjoyed it a lot. It's been two years since we left Tark and Okiku. Tark and Okiku have continued to work together hunting down child murderers and releasing the innocent souls of the children bound to them. It's been a solitary life for Tark but him and Okiku are very good at what they do. Then Tark receives word that one of his friends in Japan, Kagura, has gone missing. Kagura agreed to lead a TV crew from the US TV series, Ghost Hunters, to the mysterious Japanese forest of Aokigahara (also known as "suicide forest") in search of a mysterious village rumored to exist deep in the forest.. Unfortunately neither Kagura or the crew of Ghost Hunters has returned. Tark, Okiku, and Cassie journey to Japan to search Aokigahara for this secret village and hopefully find Kagura. The story takes a bit to get going, but once Tark gets to Japan and enters the Aokigahara forest things really get creepy and move fast. I am kind of a wuss about scary books, but although this book is creepy it never got too scary for me. It does get kind of gorey at points and there are definitely some creepy scenes, but it never gets to the point of being terrifying. I enjoy Tark and Okiku and their interesting ghost/host relationship. They have both grown a lot since the first book and learned to work well together. Okiku is a ghost strong in water element (since she died in the water) and faces a lot of changes in this book because the ghosts of the secret village are earth-based ghosts. There was some crazy Japanese mythology and history in here that I enjoyed a lot. The story was very engaging and interesting to read about. There is a lot of action, some mystery, and of course a lot of creepy. My only complaint is that some of the dialogue between the characters is a bit awkward at times. There are many times where Tark and Cassie are talking or Tark and Kagura are talking where the dialogue sounds stilted or staged...it just doesn't sound natural. I did read this as an ARC, so hopefully the final book will have dialogue that flows better. Overall I really enjoyed this creepy supernatural horror story. I love the characters, the eerie Aokigahara forest, the creepy ghost scenes, and the action. This book is a bit gory and creepy but never totally scared me. I enjoyed the mythology and history throughout. The book is left open ended, so I could see there being future books with Tark and Okiku (although I haven't heard of a third book being planned). I would recommend to those who enjoy creepy and somewhat gory ghost stories. If you are a fan of books with excellent creepy ghost stories for the middle grade and YA crowd I would also recommend the Lockwood and Co series by Jonathan Stroud; I like this series a lot and highly recommend it.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
Review courtesy of Dar...
Review courtesy of Dark Faerie Tales Quick & Dirty: A story highlighting the extent to which people can go for power. Opening Sentence: I'm no hero, believe me. The Review: This book was longer than it needed to be. As much as I love an author who knows what they're talking about, I felt there was too much world-building than was necessary for this book. In fact, I just realised that this was the second book in this series so why it needed so much backlog I don't know. It helped towards the beginning since there was a lot of Chinese and Japanese storytelling/myths involved, but towards the middle I began skimming through it, which doesn't bode well in terms of enjoying the book. The names in particular confused me as I had a hard time matching the names in the diaries to the families and houses in the village and the associated dolls/ghosts. Finding out about other cultures and their histories is always a good experience for me. So although there were definitely pieces to the sacrificial rituals that made me cringe, overall it was a brilliant concept, especially if there's some truth to it. I can't imagine what the villagers went through who were involved in such a drastic ploy for power, but when Tark found the village in the forest, I could see the beginnings of a horror movie panning out. I liked but didn't love Tark's relationship with Okiku. I've read a couple of books recently based between a human and a spirit/ghost and this wasn't necessarily the worst but there was something missing. I can't get my head around the practicality of their bond in the long term, but that's a cynic's take on romance. Personally, their relationship was more habitual than romantic. Okiku was funny, in a creepy sort of way, and I enjoyed most scenes with her when she wasn't trying to murder someone. Tark had a strong brave character, even though he insisted he wasn't a hero. His dark humour made me smile. An okay read with a very interesting foundation but would've been better if the history/background was told in an easier way to digest. It wasn't' hard to pick up even though it was part of a series. Notable Scene: Heroism isn't a trait commonly found in teenage boys. Stupidity, though? We've got that in spades. FTC Advisory: Sourcebooks Fire provided me with a copy of The Suffering. No goody bags, sponsorships, "material connections," or bribes were exchanged for my review.
Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars
I really enjoyed The G...
I really enjoyed The Girl from the Well and was excited to see that there was going to be a sequel to that book. I got a copy of this book to review from NetGalley. This ended up being a very well done and creepy ghost story with a lot of Japanese mythology throughout. I enjoyed it a lot. It's been two years since we left Tark and Okiku. Tark and Okiku have continued to work together hunting down child murderers and releasing the innocent souls of the children bound to them. It's been a solitary life for Tark but him and Okiku are very good at what they do. Then Tark receives word that one of his friends in Japan, Kagura, has gone missing. Kagura agreed to lead a TV crew from the US TV series, Ghost Hunters, to the mysterious Japanese forest of Aokigahara (also known as "suicide forest") in search of a mysterious village rumored to exist deep in the forest.. Unfortunately neither Kagura or the crew of Ghost Hunters has returned. Tark, Okiku, and Cassie journey to Japan to search Aokigahara for this secret village and hopefully find Kagura. The story takes a bit to get going, but once Tark gets to Japan and enters the Aokigahara forest things really get creepy and move fast. I am kind of a wuss about scary books, but although this book is creepy it never got too scary for me. It does get kind of gorey at points and there are definitely some creepy scenes, but it never gets to the point of being terrifying. I enjoy Tark and Okiku and their interesting ghost/host relationship. They have both grown a lot since the first book and learned to work well together. Okiku is a ghost strong in water element (since she died in the water) and faces a lot of changes in this book because the ghosts of the secret village are earth-based ghosts. There was some crazy Japanese mythology and history in here that I enjoyed a lot. The story was very engaging and interesting to read about. There is a lot of action, some mystery, and of course a lot of creepy. My only complaint is that some of the dialogue between the characters is a bit awkward at times. There are many times where Tark and Cassie are talking or Tark and Kagura are talking where the dialogue sounds stilted or staged...it just doesn't sound natural. I did read this as an ARC, so hopefully the final book will have dialogue that flows better. Overall I really enjoyed this creepy supernatural horror story. I love the characters, the eerie Aokigahara forest, the creepy ghost scenes, and the action. This book is a bit gory and creepy but never totally scared me. I enjoyed the mythology and history throughout. The book is left open ended, so I could see there being future books with Tark and Okiku (although I haven't heard of a third book being planned). I would recommend to those who enjoy creepy and somewhat gory ghost stories. If you are a fan of books with excellent creepy ghost stories for the middle grade and YA crowd I would also recommend the Lockwood and Co series by Jonathan Stroud; I like this series a lot and highly recommend it.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
Review courtesy of Dar...
Review courtesy of Dark Faerie Tales Quick & Dirty: A story highlighting the extent to which people can go for power. Opening Sentence: I'm no hero, believe me. The Review: This book was longer than it needed to be. As much as I love an author who knows what they're talking about, I felt there was too much world-building than was necessary for this book. In fact, I just realised that this was the second book in this series so why it needed so much backlog I don't know. It helped towards the beginning since there was a lot of Chinese and Japanese storytelling/myths involved, but towards the middle I began skimming through it, which doesn't bode well in terms of enjoying the book. The names in particular confused me as I had a hard time matching the names in the diaries to the families and houses in the village and the associated dolls/ghosts. Finding out about other cultures and their histories is always a good experience for me. So although there were definitely pieces to the sacrificial rituals that made me cringe, overall it was a brilliant concept, especially if there's some truth to it. I can't imagine what the villagers went through who were involved in such a drastic ploy for power, but when Tark found the village in the forest, I could see the beginnings of a horror movie panning out. I liked but didn't love Tark's relationship with Okiku. I've read a couple of books recently based between a human and a spirit/ghost and this wasn't necessarily the worst but there was something missing. I can't get my head around the practicality of their bond in the long term, but that's a cynic's take on romance. Personally, their relationship was more habitual than romantic. Okiku was funny, in a creepy sort of way, and I enjoyed most scenes with her when she wasn't trying to murder someone. Tark had a strong brave character, even though he insisted he wasn't a hero. His dark humour made me smile. An okay read with a very interesting foundation but would've been better if the history/background was told in an easier way to digest. It wasn't' hard to pick up even though it was part of a series. Notable Scene: Heroism isn't a trait commonly found in teenage boys. Stupidity, though? We've got that in spades. FTC Advisory: Sourcebooks Fire provided me with a copy of The Suffering. No goody bags, sponsorships, "material connections," or bribes were exchanged for my review.
I really enjoyed The Girl from the Well and was excited to see that there was going to be a sequel to that book. I got a copy of this book to review from NetGalley. This ended up being a very well done and creepy ghost story with a lot of Japanese mythology throughout. I enjoyed it a lot. It's been two years since we left Tark and Okiku. Tark and Okiku have continued to work together hunting down child murderers and releasing the innocent souls of the children bound to them. It's been a solitary life for Tark but him and Okiku are very good at what they do. Then Tark receives word that one of his friends in Japan, Kagura, has gone missing. Kagura agreed to lead a TV crew from the US TV series, Ghost Hunters, to the mysterious Japanese forest of Aokigahara (also known as "suicide forest") in search of a mysterious village rumored to exist deep in the forest.. Unfortunately neither Kagura or the crew of Ghost Hunters has returned. Tark, Okiku, and Cassie journey to Japan to search Aokigahara for this secret village and hopefully find Kagura. The story takes a bit to get going, but once Tark gets to Japan and enters the Aokigahara forest things really get creepy and move fast. I am kind of a wuss about scary books, but although this book is creepy it never got too scary for me. It does get kind of gorey at points and there are definitely some creepy scenes, but it never gets to the point of being terrifying. I enjoy Tark and Okiku and their interesting ghost/host relationship. They have both grown a lot since the first book and learned to work well together. Okiku is a ghost strong in water element (since she died in the water) and faces a lot of changes in this book because the ghosts of the secret village are earth-based ghosts. There was some crazy Japanese mythology and history in here that I enjoyed a lot. The story was very engaging and interesting to read about. There is a lot of action, some mystery, and of course a lot of creepy. My only complaint is that some of the dialogue between the characters is a bit awkward at times. There are many times where Tark and Cassie are talking or Tark and Kagura are talking where the dialogue sounds stilted or staged...it just doesn't sound natural. I did read this as an ARC, so hopefully the final book will have dialogue that flows better. Overall I really enjoyed this creepy supernatural horror story. I love the characters, the eerie Aokigahara forest, the creepy ghost scenes, and the action. This book is a bit gory and creepy but never totally scared me. I enjoyed the mythology and history throughout. The book is left open ended, so I could see there being future books with Tark and Okiku (although I haven't heard of a third book being planned). I would recommend to those who enjoy creepy and somewhat gory ghost stories. If you are a fan of books with excellent creepy ghost stories for the middle grade and YA crowd I would also recommend the Lockwood and Co series by Jonathan Stroud; I like this series a lot and highly recommend it.
Review courtesy of Dark Faerie Tales Quick & Dirty: A story highlighting the extent to which people can go for power. Opening Sentence: I'm no hero, believe me. The Review: This book was longer than it needed to be. As much as I love an author who knows what they're talking about, I felt there was too much world-building than was necessary for this book. In fact, I just realised that this was the second book in this series so why it needed so much backlog I don't know. It helped towards the beginning since there was a lot of Chinese and Japanese storytelling/myths involved, but towards the middle I began skimming through it, which doesn't bode well in terms of enjoying the book. The names in particular confused me as I had a hard time matching the names in the diaries to the families and houses in the village and the associated dolls/ghosts. Finding out about other cultures and their histories is always a good experience for me. So although there were definitely pieces to the sacrificial rituals that made me cringe, overall it was a brilliant concept, especially if there's some truth to it. I can't imagine what the villagers went through who were involved in such a drastic ploy for power, but when Tark found the village in the forest, I could see the beginnings of a horror movie panning out. I liked but didn't love Tark's relationship with Okiku. I've read a couple of books recently based between a human and a spirit/ghost and this wasn't necessarily the worst but there was something missing. I can't get my head around the practicality of their bond in the long term, but that's a cynic's take on romance. Personally, their relationship was more habitual than romantic. Okiku was funny, in a creepy sort of way, and I enjoyed most scenes with her when she wasn't trying to murder someone. Tark had a strong brave character, even though he insisted he wasn't a hero. His dark humour made me smile. An okay read with a very interesting foundation but would've been better if the history/background was told in an easier way to digest. It wasn't' hard to pick up even though it was part of a series. Notable Scene: Heroism isn't a trait commonly found in teenage boys. Stupidity, though? We've got that in spades. FTC Advisory: Sourcebooks Fire provided me with a copy of The Suffering. No goody bags, sponsorships, "material connections," or bribes were exchanged for my review.

Frequent mentions

1-5 of 6 reviews
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

I wish this duo was a ...

I wish this duo was a long series...so good!

Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

I really enjoyed The G...

I really enjoyed The Girl from the Well and was excited to see that there was going to be a sequel to that book. I got a copy of this book to review from NetGalley. This ended up being a very well done and creepy ghost story with a lot of Japanese mythology throughout. I enjoyed it a lot. It's been two years since we left Tark and Okiku. Tark and Okiku have continued to work together hunting down child murderers and releasing the innocent souls of the children bound to them. It's been a solitary life for Tark but him and Okiku are very good at what they do. Then Tark receives word that one of his friends in Japan, Kagura, has gone missing. Kagura agreed to lead a TV crew from the US TV series, Ghost Hunters, to the mysterious Japanese forest of Aokigahara (also known as "suicide forest") in search of a mysterious village rumored to exist deep in the forest.. Unfortunately neither Kagura or the crew of Ghost Hunters has returned. Tark, Okiku, and Cassie journey to Japan to search Aokigahara for this secret village and hopefully find Kagura. The story takes a bit to get going, but once Tark gets to Japan and enters the Aokigahara forest things really get creepy and move fast. I am kind of a wuss about scary books, but although this book is creepy it never got too scary for me. It does get kind of gorey at points and there are definitely some creepy scenes, but it never gets to the point of being terrifying. I enjoy Tark and Okiku and their interesting ghost/host relationship. They have both grown a lot since the first book and learned to work well together. Okiku is a ghost strong in water element (since she died in the water) and faces a lot of changes in this book because the ghosts of the secret village are earth-based ghosts. There was some crazy Japanese mythology and history in here that I enjoyed a lot. The story was very engaging and interesting to read about. There is a lot of action, some mystery, and of course a lot of creepy. My only complaint is that some of the dialogue between the characters is a bit awkward at times. There are many times where Tark and Cassie are talking or Tark and Kagura are talking where the dialogue sounds stilted or staged...it just doesn't sound natural. I did read this as an ARC, so hopefully the final book will have dialogue that flows better. Overall I really enjoyed this creepy supernatural horror story. I love the characters, the eerie Aokigahara forest, the creepy ghost scenes, and the action. This book is a bit gory and creepy but never totally scared me. I enjoyed the mythology and history throughout. The book is left open ended, so I could see there being future books with Tark and Okiku (although I haven't heard of a third book being planned). I would recommend to those who enjoy creepy and somewhat gory ghost stories. If you are a fan of books with excellent creepy ghost stories for the middle grade and YA crowd I would also recommend the Lockwood and Co series by Jonathan Stroud; I like this series a lot and highly recommend it.

Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

I must say there was a...

I must say there was a vast improvement for this storyline from the first book. Written in the perspective of a different character, the "counting" from the first book has dissipated. I really like the Japanese lore again and it being elaborated on. The over all creepiness improved as well and it showcased a great adventure for the storyline. I look forward to seeing what else this author writes in the future.

Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Im cringing now, and ...

I'm cringing now, and I love it! The Suffering is truly speak up for its name. The mystery, the tension, the eerie atmosphere...all of that made up a perfect The Suffering. It's dark, and creepy, and while cost your spine to froze occasionally, and it did to me, I fell for this book, hard. The characters are very interesting, and the mythology and cultural element of this book are just simple amazing! I was hooked, and I must say, you would love the feeling of being hooked that The Suffering brings to you.

Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Bravo! Seriously, this...

Bravo! Seriously, this book was excellent. I made it evident that I wasn't a huge fan of Rin Chupeco's first book, The Girl From the Well. It started out strong, but it just didn't hold up the way I wanted it to. I wanted terror. I wanted ghosts. I'm happy to say that The Suffering offered all of that, and more. You know that feeling you get when a creepy story is getting to you? The feeling where spiders crawl up your back, and unseen eyes are watching you. That, is this book. It's glorious. See, this book is entirely from Tark's point of view. That's the first thing that sold me. Seeing Okiku through his eyes, living her endless existence of revenge as a part of Tark's life, was something beautiful. It really pushed home the idea that these two are irrevocably linked. Plus, Tark was so much stronger this time around. The way this book begins, with a terrifying game of tag, shows that immediately. I can't deny, I think I love Tark as much as Okiku does now. Better still, the main setting of this particular book is in the dense forests of Aokigahara. The "suicide forest" is a 35-square-kilometer death trap in real life. In this story, it's even more horrible than that. For a boy who can see ghosts, or more accurately for a boy whom ghosts can see like a beacon of light, Aokigahara isn't the safest place to be. I'll admit, this part of the book stole my breath away. The balance between tension, and all out terror, was right on point. I warn you, it's not for the faint of heart. Rin Chupeco wholly impressed me, and I'm kind of hoping that there are more books coming in this series! I'll follow Tark and Okiku anywhere.


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