Generated at Sun, 19 May 2019 11:39:39 GMT
Electrode, Comp-406228047, DC-prod-cdc01, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-19.1.1, SHA-dcc2d1bc13aca0beb170d003517affe741b47a8c, CID-3c92c3bb-3dd-16acfe3e151a6e, Generated: Sun, 19 May 2019 11:39:39 GMT

First They Killed My Father : A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers

Walmart # 569073722

First They Killed My Father : A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers

Walmart # 569073722
$24.19$24.19
Only 5 left!
Free delivery
Or get it by Thu, May 23 with faster delivery
Pickup not available
Pickup not available
Sold & shipped byBooks Direct
A harrowing memoir of a Cambodian family shattered by Pol Pot's regime, First They Killed My Father is a powerful, unforgettable story of courage and love in the face of unspeakable brutality.

About This Item

We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it.
A harrowing memoir of a Cambodian family shattered by Pol Pot's regime, First They Killed My Father is a powerful, unforgettable story of courage and love in the face of unspeakable brutality. One of seven children of a high-ranking government official, Loung Ung lived a privileged life in the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh until the age of five. Then, in April 1975, Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge army stormed into the city, forcing Ung's family to flee and, eventually, to disperse. Loung was trained as a child soldier in a work camp for orphans, her siblings were sent to labor camps, and those who survived the horrors would not be reunited until the Khmer Rouge was destroyed. Harrowing yet hopeful, Loung's powerful story is an unforgettable account of a family shaken and shattered, yet miraculously sustained by courage and love in the face of unspeakable brutality.

Specifications

Age Range
5 - 7 Years
Publisher
Tantor Media, Inc., Tantor Audio
Book Format
Other
Author
Loung Ung; Tavia Gilbert
ISBN-13
9781452653273
Publication Date
June, 2011
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
7.58 x 5.39 x 0.56 Inches (US)
ISBN-10
1452653275
Customer Reviews
4
27 reviews
5 stars
9
4 stars
12
3 stars
3
2 stars
3
1 star
0
Top Positive Review
1 customers found this helpful
I feel bad I didn't love
I feel bad I didn't love this book--maybe I've been jaded by too many tales of misery and atrocity. Or maybe it's just reading this so soon after Egger's What is the What about Sudan or for that matter after Vaddey's The Shadow of the Banyan, also about this period, this book has a lot to live up to. I admit I'm someone who finds it hard to just go with the flow of the practice of memoirs written with the immediacy of a novel. I just don't find it credible--especially in this case where it's written from the point of view of a very young child narrator. Ung was only five years old when the Khmer Rouge forcibly evacuated her city of Phnom Pehn, less than eight when she was trained to be a soldier. The book is also written in the very literary fiction present tense, with events she didn't experience but could only imagine told through the gauze of italics. I wished at times she had told the story straight--it doesn't need to be tarted up. Or that like Vaddey or Eggers, she had written this as a novel, and not claimed this as memoir. Interestingly, Ung addresses some of these issues in her afterward about writing the book. She says she takes offense at those who feel someone so young would not remember--wouldn't even feel the trauma. She wanted to give voice to a child going through such experiences. She also defended the use of present tense. She said she originally tried to write this in the past tense, but felt that "by writing in the past tense" she was protecting herself. That she needed that immediacy. But I actually think present tense--unless handled very, very skillfully--attracts attention to itself, and so can be more distancing than the past tense. That said, this did give a day to day sense of life under the Khmer Rouge I didn't get either from the film The Killing Fields nor Veddey's novel In the Shadow of the Banyan. Part of that is because being partly Chinese, Ung experienced racism and had to hide her background, even her skin color, to avoid "ethnic cleansing"--giving her a different perspective than I've heard in other stories of this period. She spoke of the favor given to "Base People"--those native Khmer from the countryside who had been there for generations, as opposed to the "new people" driven there from the cities. And she certainly gave a vivid, harrowing account of hunger--from the physical effects to what it drives you to. Despite my criticism, this is definitely a remarkable story of survival.
Top Negative Review
I would have been much ha
I would have been much happier if this book had not passed itself off as entirely non-fiction, I think labeling it as novel based partly on her experiences would have been much more truthful. Describing herself as "middle class" seems misleading, considering the fact she says her family owns three cars, and they are eating their fill at restaurants right before the fall of Phnom Penh. Based on the dates she gives it would have been impossible for her family to have visited Angkor Wat when she said she did. In general, parts of the book felt contrived, like she was doing a checklist of everything that happened during the Cambodian genocide. All it needed was a scene of a man being murdered just for wearing glasses and you would have had it all. I'm not saying she wasn't there and that some of it didn't happen, but I am saying that there was a good amount of fiction mixed to her telling. With that said, after all the historical reading I've done on that time period, it was interesting to get a first hand account of the genocide and revolution there.
Top Positive Review
1 customers found this helpful
I feel bad I didn't love
I feel bad I didn't love this book--maybe I've been jaded by too many tales of misery and atrocity. Or maybe it's just reading this so soon after Egger's What is the What about Sudan or for that matter after Vaddey's The Shadow of the Banyan, also about this period, this book has a lot to live up to. I admit I'm someone who finds it hard to just go with the flow of the practice of memoirs written with the immediacy of a novel. I just don't find it credible--especially in this case where it's written from the point of view of a very young child narrator. Ung was only five years old when the Khmer Rouge forcibly evacuated her city of Phnom Pehn, less than eight when she was trained to be a soldier. The book is also written in the very literary fiction present tense, with events she didn't experience but could only imagine told through the gauze of italics. I wished at times she had told the story straight--it doesn't need to be tarted up. Or that like Vaddey or Eggers, she had written this as a novel, and not claimed this as memoir. Interestingly, Ung addresses some of these issues in her afterward about writing the book. She says she takes offense at those who feel someone so young would not remember--wouldn't even feel the trauma. She wanted to give voice to a child going through such experiences. She also defended the use of present tense. She said she originally tried to write this in the past tense, but felt that "by writing in the past tense" she was protecting herself. That she needed that immediacy. But I actually think present tense--unless handled very, very skillfully--attracts attention to itself, and so can be more distancing than the past tense. That said, this did give a day to day sense of life under the Khmer Rouge I didn't get either from the film The Killing Fields nor Veddey's novel In the Shadow of the Banyan. Part of that is because being partly Chinese, Ung experienced racism and had to hide her background, even her skin color, to avoid "ethnic cleansing"--giving her a different perspective than I've heard in other stories of this period. She spoke of the favor given to "Base People"--those native Khmer from the countryside who had been there for generations, as opposed to the "new people" driven there from the cities. And she certainly gave a vivid, harrowing account of hunger--from the physical effects to what it drives you to. Despite my criticism, this is definitely a remarkable story of survival.
Top Negative Review
I would have been much ha
I would have been much happier if this book had not passed itself off as entirely non-fiction, I think labeling it as novel based partly on her experiences would have been much more truthful. Describing herself as "middle class" seems misleading, considering the fact she says her family owns three cars, and they are eating their fill at restaurants right before the fall of Phnom Penh. Based on the dates she gives it would have been impossible for her family to have visited Angkor Wat when she said she did. In general, parts of the book felt contrived, like she was doing a checklist of everything that happened during the Cambodian genocide. All it needed was a scene of a man being murdered just for wearing glasses and you would have had it all. I'm not saying she wasn't there and that some of it didn't happen, but I am saying that there was a good amount of fiction mixed to her telling. With that said, after all the historical reading I've done on that time period, it was interesting to get a first hand account of the genocide and revolution there.
1-5 of 27 reviews

This book really gave me

This book really gave me insight into what happened in Cambodia. It is well written although it was sad at times. It had a quick and understandable plot. The book gave me some background knowledge on the genocide, and I loved reading it!

First They Killed My Fath

First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers by Loung Ung Even with a title like that, I had no idea what I was getting myself into. I'm not normally one for human strife stories, but I was compelled. The first time I saw the title, while searching for books for the Read Harder Challenge, I just had to read it. This is not your typical human strife story. There was something special and horrifying about reading of the Cambodian genocide through the eyes of a child, especially a child this young. The writing in the beginning took me a minute to get into. I have to wonder if it was simply the way that Ung recalls life from before the Khmer Rouge because it gets more detailed and emotional as her story progresses. There were a few other parts that felt distant like the beginning, like she was covering it just to not have gaps in the timeline of her story. The vivid memories are captivating and haunting.Ung explains the horrors of this genocide and the aftermath as she experienced them as a five year old, so the foresight and worry for the future that adults maintain, the planning and attempts to keep control are absent. She lives one day at a time, trying to understand the world as it is then presented, hoping for the best, mentally preparing for the worst that she can, but inevitably going through worse than she could think of. The uncertainty and ignorance of her initial displacement made the beginning that much more heartbreaking.My son happens to be five years old right now too and I thought about how I could explain to him something like that happening, how I could deal with knowing everything that was going on and dealing with his naivete, with whining as we walked for days because he didn't get it. I don't think I could do it, but they probably didn't think so before they had to do it either.I was impressed with her mother. For as much as Ung doesn't appreciate her mother's strength in the beginning, I found her incredible. I was grateful that she maintained the tone through these parts and didn't look back with a changed mind. She let the reader experience her frustration with her mother as it took place, as she did with everything else. Her father was even more impressive. In fact, her entire family had more strength and perseverance than I had anticipated. I suppose it is a testament to the human ability to endure and to hope in the face of great horrors. This book tore my heart out. It is a hard lesson in just how much suffering there is in the world and just how ignorant we can be of it, how adept we are at ignoring it. That it was real, not only for this family but for many others, made it so much worse. I'm not sure if it was fortunate for my reading experience that I knew relatively little about the Cambodian genocide before reading this book. I had only ever heard of Pol Pot and the landmine problem. I had heard the name Pol Pot in my childhood and his name was associated with Hitler and other horrible people, but I never really had specifics. The landmine problem I learned from Angelina Jolie's: Notes from My Travels where she recounts her visit to Cambodia. So I went into this book ignorant of the scope of the strife involved. I fully intend on reading the other two books of the series, Lucky Child: A Daughter of Cambodia Reunites with the Sister She Left Behind and Lulu in the Sky: A Daughter of Cambodia Finds Love, Healing, and Double Happiness. It also inspired me to finally read The Diary of a Young Girl, which I had been actively avoiding. I learned too much about that one and never wanted to dive into the tragedy of it. I realize from reading this that it's not about that, not really.Of course, there's more to Loung Ung's life than her past and her books. She is still an activist, please visit her activism page here. Though there is no specific release date, Angelina Jolie-Pitt has been working on Netflix movie of the book as well. You can find details here. She is also a contributor to the campaign, Girl Rising. Ung writes the story of Sokha, which is then narrated by Alicia Keys for the documentary by the same name, For details on the documentary, which was released in 2013, visit here. For details on Ung's involvement, visit here.  There is more to women and our experiences than those popularized in the US. Sometimes it can be hard to see the activism that is still necessary in other parts of the world, or the female experience outside of our comfortable homes. Despite the opinions of naysayers, feminism is a huge part of the human rights struggle in many parts of the world, though not necessarily by name but deed. While this is a book I'd recommend to anyone looking for non-fiction, it is particularly important for feminists to read about the lives of women, for us to understand and support each other. Have you read First They Killed My Father? What did you think? 

1975 übernehmen die roten

1975 übernehmen die roten Khmer die Macht in Kambodscha. Bei ihrem Versuch einen egalitären Agrarkommunismus durchzusetzen vertreiben sie die Bevölkerung aus den Städten und machen aus Kambodscha ein einziges großes Arbeits- und Gefangenenlager. Bis zum Einmarsch der Vietnamesen 1979 bezahlt ein Drittel der Bevölkerung, bis zu 3 Mio Menschen, die Schreckensherrschaft der roten Khmer und ihres "Bruders Nr. 1", Pol Pot, mit dem Leben... Die Autobiographie schildert die Zeit von der Machtübernahme bis zur Befreiung und der darauffolgenden Flucht nach Amerika aus der Sicht eines 1975 fünfjährigen Mädchens. Es schildert die Entwicklung vom umhegten Mittelklassekind im bürgerlichen Phnom Penh zur hasserfüllten Kindersoldatin. Es offenbart die Greuel des Regimes und die Lebensumstände der unterdrückten, hungernden Bevölkerung auf authentische Weise. Inhaltlich macht das Buch nicht nur betroffen: Es macht demütig und mahnt zur Bescheidenheit und dem Bewahren demokratischer Grundwerte. Hinzu kommt, dass das Buch auch aus literarischer Sicht überzeugt und nie schulmeisterhaft wirkt. Ein großes Buch, dass auf allen Schienen zu überzeugen versteht.

I feel bad I didn't love

I feel bad I didn't love this book--maybe I've been jaded by too many tales of misery and atrocity. Or maybe it's just reading this so soon after Egger's What is the What about Sudan or for that matter after Vaddey's The Shadow of the Banyan, also about this period, this book has a lot to live up to. I admit I'm someone who finds it hard to just go with the flow of the practice of memoirs written with the immediacy of a novel. I just don't find it credible--especially in this case where it's written from the point of view of a very young child narrator. Ung was only five years old when the Khmer Rouge forcibly evacuated her city of Phnom Pehn, less than eight when she was trained to be a soldier. The book is also written in the very literary fiction present tense, with events she didn't experience but could only imagine told through the gauze of italics. I wished at times she had told the story straight--it doesn't need to be tarted up. Or that like Vaddey or Eggers, she had written this as a novel, and not claimed this as memoir. Interestingly, Ung addresses some of these issues in her afterward about writing the book. She says she takes offense at those who feel someone so young would not remember--wouldn't even feel the trauma. She wanted to give voice to a child going through such experiences. She also defended the use of present tense. She said she originally tried to write this in the past tense, but felt that "by writing in the past tense" she was protecting herself. That she needed that immediacy. But I actually think present tense--unless handled very, very skillfully--attracts attention to itself, and so can be more distancing than the past tense. That said, this did give a day to day sense of life under the Khmer Rouge I didn't get either from the film The Killing Fields nor Veddey's novel In the Shadow of the Banyan. Part of that is because being partly Chinese, Ung experienced racism and had to hide her background, even her skin color, to avoid "ethnic cleansing"--giving her a different perspective than I've heard in other stories of this period. She spoke of the favor given to "Base People"--those native Khmer from the countryside who had been there for generations, as opposed to the "new people" driven there from the cities. And she certainly gave a vivid, harrowing account of hunger--from the physical effects to what it drives you to. Despite my criticism, this is definitely a remarkable story of survival.

The Short of It: A you

The Short of It: A young girl's heart wrenching tale of her family's struggle for survival during the Cambodian Genocide (1975-1979). Hard to stomach at times but beautifully written. The Rest of It: Ung's tale begins in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Once known at "the pearl of Aisa", Phnom Penh is the home of the Ung family which consists of her mother and father, and her siblings, Meng, Khouy, Keav, Kim, Chou, Loung (the author) and Geak. Life in Phnom Penh is quite pleasant for Loung. Her father (Pa) works for the government and is highly respected in the community. Due to his class standing, they live in a nice house and Loung's mother (Ma), does not need to work. However, as the Khmer Rouge invade Cambodia, the Ung family is forced to leave their home. This is Loung's story of what happened to them on their way to Thailand. As you can imagine, this is a very tough story to read. Loung is so young when her family is forced to move. She is only five-year's old. Caring for her younger siblings and sometimes even the older ones, must have been very tough for her. As her family makes their way from one work camp to another, their fight to stay alive becomes more difficult as food rations dwindle, and violence abounds all around them. This is from page 149/50 of the paperback. Loung is referring to her younger sister's emaciated body: My eyes stay on Geak. She does not talk anymore. She is so thin it is as if her body is eating itself up. Her skin is pale yellow, her teeth rotten or missing. Still she is beautiful because she is good and pure. Looking at her makes me want to die inside. Ung's story is quite compelling. Her relationship with her father comes through as being strong and solid, so much so, that when the soldiers take him away, her world falls down around her. Since it is impossible to know exactly what happened to her father, she fills in the gaps with visions she has of the event. These visions seem plausible and serve as closure for her, and I found them to be quite effective. She uses this technique again towards the end of the story and although I saw it coming, it was just as effective and shook me to the core. What was particularly poignant for me, were her memories of life in Phnom Penh. The clothes they wore, the food they ate. She never realized how good she had it until all of it was taken away. Those moments seemed so small to her at the time, but in reflection, they end up being the cement that holds her together. My book club chose this book for May. We meet to discuss it next week. I didn't know too much about the Cambodian Genocide before reading it. Although it is a tough read and hard to stomach at times (it took me a really long time to finish), I am glad I read it. I would recommend it to anyone who wants to know more about this topic. Source: Purchased
Questions & Answers0 question
Get specific details about this product from customers who own it.

Policies & Plans

See any care plans, options and policies that may be associated with this product.
Electrode, App-product, Comp-389264341, DC-prod-cdc01, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-29.0.16-rc-3, SHA-be3b5cd33cf2201002aafe92047174b804e8a87a, CID-
webapp branch
Electrode, Comp-389264341, DC-prod-cdc01, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-29.0.16-rc-3, SHA-be3b5cd33cf2201002aafe92047174b804e8a87a, CID-cd42892c-2e3-16acfe3e10d82a, Generated: Sun, 19 May 2019 11:39:39 GMT