Shop smart, stay safe: Our latest response to COVID-19.

Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution

Average Rating:(3.4)out of 5 stars
Walmart # 571971592
$11.69$11.69
Free
2-day delivery
on $35+ orders

Arrives by Thu, Jun 4

Free pickup Thu, Jun 4

Ships to San Leandro, 1919 Davis St

Sold & shipped byWalmart
Gifting note:Ships in the manufacturer's original packaging, which may reveal the contents.
<b>More trouble at school and at home -- and the discovery of a missive from her late soldier sister -- send Angie and a long-ago friend on an RV road trip across Ohio.</b> <p></p>Sophomore year has just begun, and Angie is miserable. Her girlfriend, KC, has moved away; her good friend, Jake, is keeping his distance; and the resident bully has ramped up an increasingly vicious and targeted campaign to humiliate her. An over-the-top statue dedication planned for her sister, who died in Iraq, is almost too much to bear, and it doesn't help that her mother has placed a symbolic empty urn on their mantel. At the ceremony, a soldier hands Angie a final letter from her sister, including a list of places she wanted the two of them to visit when she got home from the war. With her mother threatening to send Angie to a &quot;treatment center&quot; and the situation at school becoming violent, Angie enlists the help of her estranged childhood friend, Jamboree. Along with a few other outsiders, they pack into an RV and head across the state on the road trip Angie's sister did not live to take. It might be just what Angie needs to find a way to let her sister go, and find herself in the process.

About This Item

We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it.
More trouble at school and at home -- and the discovery of a missive from her late soldier sister -- send Angie and a long-ago friend on an RV road trip across Ohio.

Sophomore year has just begun, and Angie is miserable. Her girlfriend, KC, has moved away; her good friend, Jake, is keeping his distance; and the resident bully has ramped up an increasingly vicious and targeted campaign to humiliate her. An over-the-top statue dedication planned for her sister, who died in Iraq, is almost too much to bear, and it doesn't help that her mother has placed a symbolic empty urn on their mantel. At the ceremony, a soldier hands Angie a final letter from her sister, including a list of places she wanted the two of them to visit when she got home from the war. With her mother threatening to send Angie to a "treatment center" and the situation at school becoming violent, Angie enlists the help of her estranged childhood friend, Jamboree. Along with a few other outsiders, they pack into an RV and head across the state on the road trip Angie's sister did not live to take. It might be just what Angie needs to find a way to let her sister go, and find herself in the process.More trouble at school and at home — and the discovery of a missive from her late soldier sister — send Angie and a long-ago friend on an RV road trip across Ohio.

Sophomore year has just begun, and Angie is miserable. Her girlfriend, KC, has moved away; her good friend, Jake, is keeping his distance; and the resident bully has ramped up an increasingly vicious and targeted campaign to humiliate her. An over-the-top statue dedication planned for her sister, who died in Iraq, is almost too much to bear, and it doesn't help that her mother has placed a symbolic empty urn on their mantel. At the ceremony, a soldier hands Angie a final letter from her sister, including a list of places she wanted the two of them to visit when she got home from the war. With her mother threatening to send Angie to a “treatment center” and the situation at school becoming violent, Angie enlists the help of her estranged childhood friend, Jamboree. Along with a few other outsiders, they pack into an RV and head across the state on the road trip Angie's sister did not live to take. It might be just what Angie needs to find a way to let her sister go, and find herself in the process.

Specifications

Series Title
Fat Angie
Publisher
Candlewick Press
Book Format
Hardcover
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
352
Author
e.E. Charlton-Trujillo
ISBN-13
9780763693459
Publication Date
March, 2019
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
8.06 x 5.63 x 1.10 Inches
ISBN-10
0763693456

Customer Reviews

Average Rating:(3.4)out of 5 stars
5 stars
2
4 stars
4
3 stars
6
2 stars
1
1 star
1
Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
Angie is a human train...
Angie is a human train wreck with absolutely no rescuers in sight. She's always been on the heavy side, but after her super athlete older sister enlisted and was sent to Iraq where she was captured and hasn't been seen for months, she pretty much self-destructed. She cut her wrists in the girl's bathroom before running through a school assembly and screaming as blood flew everywhere. There's no way to get past something of that magnitude, especially when the Queen of Mean at her school, along with her toadies delights in making her feel less than useless every day. Her mother, a totally self-absorbed twit who is dating her adopted brother's therapist keeps telling her to just get over it. That is when she's not turning the spotlight on herself and making like she has to be a martyr because of her loser daughter. Wang, her adopted brother, has mega-issues himself and takes his anger out on her. Her father bolted years ago and now has a new wife and two perfect kids. Her therapist has absolutely no empathy and seems to delight in taking everything Angie says and citing it as yet another example of her dysfunction. That leaves misery, isolation and compulsive consumption of junk food as the only constants in her life. That is until new girl K.C. Arrives at her school. Tall, beautiful and hip, K.C. Scares Angie at first because she looks at her and even talks to her. Better yet, she listens and seems to understand how Angie feels. What follows is a beautiful, but painful transformation for Angie. It's one that forces her to accept the possibility that someone might actually love her, that she's probably gay and that despite the sadness of her sister's disappearance hanging over her every day, her life is hers and she can change it. This is an extremely intriguing book that's unafraid to take the main character through hell several times on the way to finding love, sunlight and self-acceptance. It's one that teens who like an underdog or who have been bullied will really relate to and should be on the shelf of every school and public library because it's just that good.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
I have a sneaking susp...
I have a sneaking suspicion that I just didn't "get" this book. Someone else with a different sense of humour would probably enjoy it very much. I didn't like the "fat-shaming" and found the relationship between the teenage girl and her mother to be over the top and unbelievable.
Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
Angie is a human train...
Angie is a human train wreck with absolutely no rescuers in sight. She's always been on the heavy side, but after her super athlete older sister enlisted and was sent to Iraq where she was captured and hasn't been seen for months, she pretty much self-destructed. She cut her wrists in the girl's bathroom before running through a school assembly and screaming as blood flew everywhere. There's no way to get past something of that magnitude, especially when the Queen of Mean at her school, along with her toadies delights in making her feel less than useless every day. Her mother, a totally self-absorbed twit who is dating her adopted brother's therapist keeps telling her to just get over it. That is when she's not turning the spotlight on herself and making like she has to be a martyr because of her loser daughter. Wang, her adopted brother, has mega-issues himself and takes his anger out on her. Her father bolted years ago and now has a new wife and two perfect kids. Her therapist has absolutely no empathy and seems to delight in taking everything Angie says and citing it as yet another example of her dysfunction. That leaves misery, isolation and compulsive consumption of junk food as the only constants in her life. That is until new girl K.C. Arrives at her school. Tall, beautiful and hip, K.C. Scares Angie at first because she looks at her and even talks to her. Better yet, she listens and seems to understand how Angie feels. What follows is a beautiful, but painful transformation for Angie. It's one that forces her to accept the possibility that someone might actually love her, that she's probably gay and that despite the sadness of her sister's disappearance hanging over her every day, her life is hers and she can change it. This is an extremely intriguing book that's unafraid to take the main character through hell several times on the way to finding love, sunlight and self-acceptance. It's one that teens who like an underdog or who have been bullied will really relate to and should be on the shelf of every school and public library because it's just that good.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
I have a sneaking susp...
I have a sneaking suspicion that I just didn't "get" this book. Someone else with a different sense of humour would probably enjoy it very much. I didn't like the "fat-shaming" and found the relationship between the teenage girl and her mother to be over the top and unbelievable.
Angie is a human train wreck with absolutely no rescuers in sight. She's always been on the heavy side, but after her super athlete older sister enlisted and was sent to Iraq where she was captured and hasn't been seen for months, she pretty much self-destructed. She cut her wrists in the girl's bathroom before running through a school assembly and screaming as blood flew everywhere. There's no way to get past something of that magnitude, especially when the Queen of Mean at her school, along with her toadies delights in making her feel less than useless every day. Her mother, a totally self-absorbed twit who is dating her adopted brother's therapist keeps telling her to just get over it. That is when she's not turning the spotlight on herself and making like she has to be a martyr because of her loser daughter. Wang, her adopted brother, has mega-issues himself and takes his anger out on her. Her father bolted years ago and now has a new wife and two perfect kids. Her therapist has absolutely no empathy and seems to delight in taking everything Angie says and citing it as yet another example of her dysfunction. That leaves misery, isolation and compulsive consumption of junk food as the only constants in her life. That is until new girl K.C. Arrives at her school. Tall, beautiful and hip, K.C. Scares Angie at first because she looks at her and even talks to her. Better yet, she listens and seems to understand how Angie feels. What follows is a beautiful, but painful transformation for Angie. It's one that forces her to accept the possibility that someone might actually love her, that she's probably gay and that despite the sadness of her sister's disappearance hanging over her every day, her life is hers and she can change it. This is an extremely intriguing book that's unafraid to take the main character through hell several times on the way to finding love, sunlight and self-acceptance. It's one that teens who like an underdog or who have been bullied will really relate to and should be on the shelf of every school and public library because it's just that good.
I have a sneaking suspicion that I just didn't "get" this book. Someone else with a different sense of humour would probably enjoy it very much. I didn't like the "fat-shaming" and found the relationship between the teenage girl and her mother to be over the top and unbelievable.

Frequent mentions

1-5 of 14 reviews
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

Angie is a human train...

Angie is a human train wreck with absolutely no rescuers in sight. She's always been on the heavy side, but after her super athlete older sister enlisted and was sent to Iraq where she was captured and hasn't been seen for months, she pretty much self-destructed. She cut her wrists in the girl's bathroom before running through a school assembly and screaming as blood flew everywhere. There's no way to get past something of that magnitude, especially when the Queen of Mean at her school, along with her toadies delights in making her feel less than useless every day. Her mother, a totally self-absorbed twit who is dating her adopted brother's therapist keeps telling her to just get over it. That is when she's not turning the spotlight on herself and making like she has to be a martyr because of her loser daughter. Wang, her adopted brother, has mega-issues himself and takes his anger out on her. Her father bolted years ago and now has a new wife and two perfect kids. Her therapist has absolutely no empathy and seems to delight in taking everything Angie says and citing it as yet another example of her dysfunction. That leaves misery, isolation and compulsive consumption of junk food as the only constants in her life. That is until new girl K.C. Arrives at her school. Tall, beautiful and hip, K.C. Scares Angie at first because she looks at her and even talks to her. Better yet, she listens and seems to understand how Angie feels. What follows is a beautiful, but painful transformation for Angie. It's one that forces her to accept the possibility that someone might actually love her, that she's probably gay and that despite the sadness of her sister's disappearance hanging over her every day, her life is hers and she can change it. This is an extremely intriguing book that's unafraid to take the main character through hell several times on the way to finding love, sunlight and self-acceptance. It's one that teens who like an underdog or who have been bullied will really relate to and should be on the shelf of every school and public library because it's just that good.

Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

Angie is about to star...

Angie is about to start sophomore year, and she's miserable. She made it through 9th grade on her second go, but her girlfriend has moved away, her best friend has been emotionally distant, the guy who has been bullying her has increased his efforts, and Angie is still trying to figure out how to mourn her sister. She is certain that she doesn't like the very public method of grieving that their mother has adopted, and it's after the ceremonial unveiling of her sister's statue that Angie finds her own way. Her sister had written one last letter to Angie, and it detailed a road trip plan for the two of them--a plan that she hoped would help Angie conquer many of her fears. FAT ANGIE: REBEL GIRL REVOLUTION by e.E. Charlton-Trujillo is a follow-up to FAT ANGIE. Unfortunately, I didn't read the first book, but that didn't stop me from being able to immerse myself in Angie's story--and her pain. Charlton-Trujillo fills in the book one backstory so that readers who are new to Angie can keep up as she moves forward, and the author manages it without interrupting the flow of her narrative too much. And that narrative ... I enjoyed it so much. The writing style for FAT ANGIE is different. There are plenty of lists, there are definitions, and there are a lot of hyphenated descriptors, and it took a couple of pages for me to adapt. Once I did, the story pulled me in and left me completely invested in Angie, her pain, and her humor. Charlton-Trujillo's approach to telling Angie's story fits perfectly with her main character's thoughts, and a lot of those thoughts are dark and angry because Angie's life is filled those things. Happily, Angie is remarkably resilient, and there's enough humor, love, and adventure to balance the pain. That said, there were plenty of sections of the book that left me reading with tears streaming down my face--be warned if, like me, you read books in public places. As Angie observes, "Life is heart and ache ... you can't have one without the other." FAT ANGIE's secondary characters, though diverse, aren't as well drawn as Angie, and we get to see them only through Angie's lens. And Angie's relationships with her friends and family are far from perfect. Her mother is unapproachable and judgmental, Angie feels that all of her friends have deserted her over the years, and Angie has trouble accepting kindnesses from people. She's seeing a therapist, but Angie is suspicious of anything that has been arranged by her mother, so she's afraid to be too invested in the therapist's suggestions. There are many great observations in FAT ANGIE, and many lessons about grieving, friendships, and self-love. But my favorite might be one that I shared with my own teen daughter: "Girls who have a story don't ever have to apologize for living it. You just gotta learn from it." FAT ANGIE: REBEL GIRL REVOLUTION is a terrific book, and my thanks to the publisher for a copy of the book in exchange for my unbiased review.

Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

I received an ARC of t...

I received an ARC of this book for free from the publisher (Candlewick Press) in exchange for an honest review. First off, I just want to put out a trigger warning since this book deals with a lot of serious topics such as fat shaming, bullying, grief, homophobia, and self-harm. This book is the sequel to Fat Angie, and going into this book I did not know that. I had thought it was a standalone book. Even though I did not read the first book, I was still able to understand what was happening in this book. There were a few things that I was confused about in the beginning, but I managed to figure it out. I liked the plot of the book, particularly the road trip aspect. The reason why I wanted to read this book was because it was about an RV road trip. I'm an RVer so that appealed to me. The best parts of the book involved the road trip. The beginning of the book is really heavy subject-wise, so the road trip came at the perfect time. However, the execution of the book wasn't great. The writing style wasn't my favorite. It was a bit awkward and clunky at times. I wished it flowed more smoothly. Overall, I enjoyed the story despite some flaws in the execution.

Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Dangit. Never judge a ...

Dangit. Never judge a book by its cover. Literally or figuratively. I was expecting some Precious/Push wannabe. But no. This book was full of complex depth that really spoke to the teenage trial - whether or not you've ever struggled with weight, whether or not you've lost someone to the military or war.

Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

Having not read this f...

Having not read this first book in this series, I was concerned about whether or not I would be okay reading this book. However, I don't feel like I missed much to the back story. I did have trouble connecting with the book - and maybe that's because I expected something more like She's Come Undone by Wally Lamb. However, this is a quick read with some interesting perspectives.


Customer Q&A

Get specific details about this product from customers who own it.

Ask a question

If you would like to share feedback with us about pricing, delivery or other customer service issues, please contact customer service directly.

Policies & Plans

Pricing policy

About our prices
We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything. So if you find a current lower price from an online retailer on an identical, in-stock product, tell us and we'll match it. See more details atOnline Price Match.

webapp branch
Electrode, Comp-389271334, DC-prod-cdc03, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-35.3.0, SHA-07c8200f8bec4e34b57e6f3462dad589f86cab05, CID-8cd1f6b7-1bf-172758fcd7cd33, Generated: Tue, 02 Jun 2020 15:04:19 GMT