Matthew Desmond

Evicted : Poverty and Profit in the American City

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<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER - WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE - NAMED ONE OF <i>TIME</i>'S TEN BEST NONFICTION BOOKS OF THE DECADE - One of the most acclaimed books of our time, this modern classic &quot;has set a new standard for reporting on poverty&quot; (Barbara Ehrenreich, <i>The New York Times Book Review</i>).</b> <p></p>In <i>Evicted</i>, Princeton sociologist and MacArthur &quot;Genius&quot; Matthew Desmond follows eight families in Milwaukee as they each struggle to keep a roof over their heads. Hailed as &quot;wrenching and revelatory&quot; ( <i>The Nation</i>), &quot;vivid and unsettling&quot; ( <i>New York Review of Books</i>), <i>Evicted </i>transforms our understanding of poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving one of twenty-first-century America's most devastating problems. Its unforgettable scenes of hope and loss remind us of the centrality of home, without which nothing else is possible. <p></p> <b>NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY President Barack Obama - <i>The New York Times Book Review - The Boston Globe - The Washington Post - </i>NPR<i> - Entertainment Weekly - The New Yorker - Bloomberg - Esquire - BuzzFeed - Fortune - San Francisco Chronicle - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel - St. Louis Post-Dispatch - Politico - The Week - </i>Chicago Public Library <i>- BookPage - Kirkus Reviews - Library Journal - Publishers Weekly - Booklist - Shelf Awareness</i></b> <p></p> <b>WINNER OF: The National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction - The PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction - The Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction - The Hillman Prize for Book Journalism - The PEN/New England Award - The <i>Chicago Tribune </i>Heartland Prize</b> <p></p> <b>FINALIST FOR THE <i>LOS ANGELES TIMES</i> BOOK PRIZE AND THE KIRKUS PRIZE</b> <p></p>&quot; <i>Evicted </i>stands among the very best of the social justice books.&quot; <b>--Ann Patchett, author of <i>Bel Canto </i>and <i>Commonwealth </i></b> <p></p>&quot;Gripping and moving--tragic, too.&quot; <b>--Jesmyn Ward, author of <i>Salvage the Bones</i></b> <br /> <b><i> </i></b> <br />&quot; <i>Evicted </i>is that rare work that has something genuinely new to say about poverty.&quot; <b><i>--San Francisco Chronicle</i></b>

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE - NAMED ONE OF TIME'S TEN BEST NONFICTION BOOKS OF THE DECADE - One of the most acclaimed books of our time, this modern classic "has set a new standard for reporting on poverty" (Barbara Ehrenreich, The New York Times Book Review).

In Evicted, Princeton sociologist and MacArthur "Genius" Matthew Desmond follows eight families in Milwaukee as they each struggle to keep a roof over their heads. Hailed as "wrenching and revelatory" ( The Nation), "vivid and unsettling" ( New York Review of Books), Evicted transforms our understanding of poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving one of twenty-first-century America's most devastating problems. Its unforgettable scenes of hope and loss remind us of the centrality of home, without which nothing else is possible.

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY President Barack Obama - The New York Times Book Review - The Boston Globe - The Washington Post - NPR - Entertainment Weekly - The New Yorker - Bloomberg - Esquire - BuzzFeed - Fortune - San Francisco Chronicle - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel - St. Louis Post-Dispatch - Politico - The Week - Chicago Public Library - BookPage - Kirkus Reviews - Library Journal - Publishers Weekly - Booklist - Shelf Awareness

WINNER OF: The National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction - The PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction - The Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction - The Hillman Prize for Book Journalism - The PEN/New England Award - The Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize

FINALIST FOR THE LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE AND THE KIRKUS PRIZE

" Evicted stands among the very best of the social justice books." --Ann Patchett, author of Bel Canto and Commonwealth

"Gripping and moving--tragic, too." --Jesmyn Ward, author of Salvage the Bones

" Evicted is that rare work that has something genuinely new to say about poverty." --San Francisco ChronicleNEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE • NAMED ONE OF TIME’S TEN BEST NONFICTION BOOKS OF THE DECADE • One of the most acclaimed books of our time, this modern classic “has set a new standard for reporting on poverty” (Barbara Ehrenreich, The New York Times Book Review).

In  Evicted, Princeton sociologist and MacArthur “Genius” Matthew Desmond follows eight families in Milwaukee as they each struggle to keep a roof over their heads. Hailed as “wrenching and revelatory” ( The Nation), “vivid and unsettling” ( New York Review of Books),  Evicted transforms our understanding of poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving one of twenty-first-century America’s most devastating problems. Its unforgettable scenes of hope and loss remind us of the centrality of home, without which nothing else is possible. 

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY President Barack Obama • The New York Times Book Review • The Boston Globe • The Washington Post • NPR • Entertainment Weekly • The New Yorker • Bloomberg • Esquire • BuzzFeed • Fortune • San Francisco Chronicle • Milwaukee Journal Sentinel • St. Louis Post-Dispatch • Politico • The Week • Chicago Public Library • BookPage • Kirkus Reviews • Library Journal •  Publishers Weekly • Booklist • Shelf Awareness

WINNER OF: The National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction • The PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction • The Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction • The Hillman Prize for Book Journalism • The PEN/New England Award • The Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize

FINALIST FOR THE LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE AND THE KIRKUS PRIZE

Evicted stands among the very best of the social justice books.” —Ann Patchett, author of Bel Canto and Commonwealth 

“Gripping and moving—tragic, too.” —Jesmyn Ward, author of Salvage the Bones

Evicted is that rare work that has something genuinely new to say about poverty.” —San Francisco Chronicle

Specifications

Publisher
Crown Pub Inc
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
448
Author
Matthew Desmond
ISBN-13
9780553447453
Publication Date
February, 2017
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
7.94 x 5.17 x 0.93 Inches
ISBN-10
0553447459

Customer Reviews

Average Rating:(4.7)out of 5 stars
5 stars
62
4 stars
18
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Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
I held off reviewing t...
I held off reviewing this because I'd made too many notes, and now I'll admit defeat. This is the best book on American poverty, of a pretty good crew, that I've read in the last few years. It features ethnography from Desmond's research with an African-American landlord, a white landlord at a trailer park, and a number of renters-mostly African-American and white-facing eviction over the course of a few years. But these individual stories are effortlessly combined with the stunning statistics about poverty and race Desmond has compiled through quantitative research. It's a tour de force about a terrible topic. Among other things, Desmond shows that poor African-American women, many with children, are as likely to get evicted as African-American men are to go to prison or jail. Desmond also documents the ways in which poverty keeps people poor-expenses accrued trying to keep precious possessions and documents in storage, sometimes ultimately lost; jobs and schools disrupted by moving around; benefits missed. Poverty contributes to unreliability, and unreliability is a good way to stay poor (though not so much a problem if you are already comfortable-that's when people make excuses for you). Highly recommended, though not a pleasant read.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
This lengthy tome cont...
This lengthy tome contains a few characters who pop up throughout the book, but the eight families who are featured contain so many characters' names that this reader had trouble keeping up with who was whom. The stories are heartbreaking, but the author does not recognize that lack of education, out of wedlock births, drugs, lack of housecleaning, and lack of work ethic are the causes of poverty. Instead he treats eviction as a cause, rather than an effect. The epilogue is a jarring departure from the whole of the book in which he states that America should be a utopia in which rent is never more than 30% of income. However, he doesn't seem to understand that working class families in America typically spend over 50% of their income on taxes and housing. This book was the author's "project" and presents an eye-opening view of poverty, but is overly focused on eviction.
Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
I held off reviewing t...
I held off reviewing this because I'd made too many notes, and now I'll admit defeat. This is the best book on American poverty, of a pretty good crew, that I've read in the last few years. It features ethnography from Desmond's research with an African-American landlord, a white landlord at a trailer park, and a number of renters-mostly African-American and white-facing eviction over the course of a few years. But these individual stories are effortlessly combined with the stunning statistics about poverty and race Desmond has compiled through quantitative research. It's a tour de force about a terrible topic. Among other things, Desmond shows that poor African-American women, many with children, are as likely to get evicted as African-American men are to go to prison or jail. Desmond also documents the ways in which poverty keeps people poor-expenses accrued trying to keep precious possessions and documents in storage, sometimes ultimately lost; jobs and schools disrupted by moving around; benefits missed. Poverty contributes to unreliability, and unreliability is a good way to stay poor (though not so much a problem if you are already comfortable-that's when people make excuses for you). Highly recommended, though not a pleasant read.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
This lengthy tome cont...
This lengthy tome contains a few characters who pop up throughout the book, but the eight families who are featured contain so many characters' names that this reader had trouble keeping up with who was whom. The stories are heartbreaking, but the author does not recognize that lack of education, out of wedlock births, drugs, lack of housecleaning, and lack of work ethic are the causes of poverty. Instead he treats eviction as a cause, rather than an effect. The epilogue is a jarring departure from the whole of the book in which he states that America should be a utopia in which rent is never more than 30% of income. However, he doesn't seem to understand that working class families in America typically spend over 50% of their income on taxes and housing. This book was the author's "project" and presents an eye-opening view of poverty, but is overly focused on eviction.
I held off reviewing this because I'd made too many notes, and now I'll admit defeat. This is the best book on American poverty, of a pretty good crew, that I've read in the last few years. It features ethnography from Desmond's research with an African-American landlord, a white landlord at a trailer park, and a number of renters-mostly African-American and white-facing eviction over the course of a few years. But these individual stories are effortlessly combined with the stunning statistics about poverty and race Desmond has compiled through quantitative research. It's a tour de force about a terrible topic. Among other things, Desmond shows that poor African-American women, many with children, are as likely to get evicted as African-American men are to go to prison or jail. Desmond also documents the ways in which poverty keeps people poor-expenses accrued trying to keep precious possessions and documents in storage, sometimes ultimately lost; jobs and schools disrupted by moving around; benefits missed. Poverty contributes to unreliability, and unreliability is a good way to stay poor (though not so much a problem if you are already comfortable-that's when people make excuses for you). Highly recommended, though not a pleasant read.
This lengthy tome contains a few characters who pop up throughout the book, but the eight families who are featured contain so many characters' names that this reader had trouble keeping up with who was whom. The stories are heartbreaking, but the author does not recognize that lack of education, out of wedlock births, drugs, lack of housecleaning, and lack of work ethic are the causes of poverty. Instead he treats eviction as a cause, rather than an effect. The epilogue is a jarring departure from the whole of the book in which he states that America should be a utopia in which rent is never more than 30% of income. However, he doesn't seem to understand that working class families in America typically spend over 50% of their income on taxes and housing. This book was the author's "project" and presents an eye-opening view of poverty, but is overly focused on eviction.

Frequent mentions

1-5 of 83 reviews
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

I held off reviewing t...

I held off reviewing this because I'd made too many notes, and now I'll admit defeat. This is the best book on American poverty, of a pretty good crew, that I've read in the last few years. It features ethnography from Desmond's research with an African-American landlord, a white landlord at a trailer park, and a number of renters-mostly African-American and white-facing eviction over the course of a few years. But these individual stories are effortlessly combined with the stunning statistics about poverty and race Desmond has compiled through quantitative research. It's a tour de force about a terrible topic. Among other things, Desmond shows that poor African-American women, many with children, are as likely to get evicted as African-American men are to go to prison or jail. Desmond also documents the ways in which poverty keeps people poor-expenses accrued trying to keep precious possessions and documents in storage, sometimes ultimately lost; jobs and schools disrupted by moving around; benefits missed. Poverty contributes to unreliability, and unreliability is a good way to stay poor (though not so much a problem if you are already comfortable-that's when people make excuses for you). Highly recommended, though not a pleasant read.

Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

Evicted is stunningly ...

Evicted is stunningly well-researched and well-written. Desmond follows a large group of people--both tenants and landlords--and focuses on impact the cycle and threat of eviction have on all of them. He does a good job of letting the subjects speak for themselves, and of providing background to the reader. The end notes are also worth a look. Really well done; I'll be following this author with interest.

Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

Evicted is a fascinati...

Evicted is a fascinating look at poverty in big city America. The focus here is on Milwaukee but I'm sure this takes place everywhere. Desmond has done an exhaustive job here. He looks at the issue of eviction from the renter and the landlord, the different situations blacks and whites encounter. I really had no idea evictions were so commonplace and almost expected. Desmond gives us an inner view of the cycle of poverty, how difficult it is to see a positive outcome for those trapped there. This book is highly recommended. I appreciated the author's attempt to offer ideas on how to improve the problem of housing for the poor, as opposed to many who study inner city poverty and just give the facts on what is happening.

Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

When this title arrive...

When this title arrived at the library, I read the description and knew I had to listen to it. Shelter is one of the first building blocks in Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. And yet, so many struggle to keep a roof over their heads. "Matthew Desmond takes us into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge." These are stories of real people, their struggle to feed themselves and their family after spending most of what they have each month on rent. Rent for substandard living conditions. On the flip side, Desmond interviews two landlords who rent out these rundown apartments, homes and trailers. This is how they make a living - they're not in it for charity. Eviction is the word, the threat, the reality. Oh, my heart broke as I listened to these stories. Yes, it's very easy to say, just get a job and manage your money better. And many of these tenants are desperately trying to do that. But easier said than done in many cases. Despair drives people to self destructive behaviour sometimes. I got so angry at the callous nature of the landlords, not seeing their tenants as people, but as dollar signs. Evicted is a microcosmic look at a bigger problem. Desmond immerses himself, collecting data, recording stories and proposing changes......this is an important book for everyone to read. We all need a safe place to call home. Dion Graham was the narrator and did an excellent job.

Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

I won a copy of Evicte...

I won a copy of Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City through Librarything's Early Reader program in exchange for an honest review. If I may be so bold as to say that Evicted may become a classic in social science literature. Sociologist, Matthew Desmond, chronicles the lives of landlords and tenants in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He intertwines facts and statistics to provide context to the stories presented in his work. It is a work of scholarship that reads like a novel. Personally, the book created an emotional undertow when reading it. Evicted depicted the hopelessness and downward spiral of poverty in America and the social, economic, physical and emotional toll of being evicted. The work also demonstrated the policy-in-experience of laws that are on the books, such as landlords being responsible for the criminality of their tenants. Tenants can be evicted if there are more than three emergency calls to a unit within a month. The result is that women in abusive relationships need to decide whether to get beat up or evicted. In one circumstance, one of the factors that lead to a family being evicted after living in an apartment for a month is that the mother called an ambulance because her son had an asthma attack. The police weren't even called, but it was labeled a 'nuisance building'' because of other contributing factors such as the babysitter knocking on a neighbor's door asking for weed and one of the sons throwing something out of a window. The family was notified of the eviction after the funeral of another family member. There are so many other tales like this. I want to know if anything has changed for anyone in the book. Is Scott still clean? What happened to Venetta in prison and after she was released? Has anyone found a place to call home? Evicted should serve as a wake up call for everyone to understand how finding a place to call home can be so elusive to those in grinding poverty.


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