Seth Stephens-Davidowitz

Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us about Who We Really Are (Paperback)

Average Rating:out of 5 stars
Write a review
Walmart # 565626046
$5.49$5.49
$3.99 delivery

Arrives by Fri, Aug 14

Pickup not available

Sold & shipped byBook Outlet

About This Item

We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it.

Customer Reviews

Average Rating:(4.2)out of 5 stars
5 stars
2
4 stars
3
3 stars
1
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Frequent mentions

1-5 of 6 reviews
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

Its hard to imagine a...

It's hard to imagine a book written mostly based on what people entered in Google search, but the author ingeniously used this easy-to-obtain repository to find many things about us. Obtaining an authentic source of data is key to any data analysis. He rightly argues that people are less truthful to their closest aides/partners, but disclose their honest feelings to a search engine. I'm guilty myself, so much so, that I'm cautious of what I enter in the search bar now.. well not quite, I'll probably continue being myself. There's a disclaimer on what Big Data cannot do and how it should not be used. The author also warns us of jumping to conclusions just because our data set was large. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and will wait for Everybody (still) lies.

Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

Entertaining and inter...

Entertaining and interesting. Maybe jumping to conclusions a little fast, e.g. Obama lost four percent of votes in areas with racist searches. He often takes google searches to be random samples of people's thoughts, which they are not, and often does not seem not to worry about selection in who searches and why. Fun: seeming breastfeeding wife fetish in India, vagina smell most searched by women, English vs Spanish autocomplete with pregnant wife; but could discuss more what drives results. Falsifiable Freud: phallos shaped fruit like banana and cucumber not more common than other fruits and vegetables in dreams. But this does not really falsify, everything may mean something. Better on Freudian slips - typing errors with sexual connotations not unusual compared to random. But a Freudian will presumably still believe it does mean something when a human commits such an error... The book loses focus somewhat when starting to talk about big data generally. Good and sober section on the dangers and desirability/fairness of using big data information to assess loan applications etc. Recommended.

Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

This book provides ple...

This book provides plenty of food for thought and ambitious in its scope - the author uses Google search data to present theories about why Donald Trump was elected president, the prevalence of racism in American society, the value of attending an elite high school, how to determine a good sport player, and more topics both grand and petty. It's all presented in an engaging manner and helps one make sense of what some of the trends identified mean. It also can sometimes be a little creepy if one thinks about how often we interact with internet services (Google, Facebook, Twitter, etc) and the amount of data that is recorded about our behavior (even if it's largely anonymous data gathering).

Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Jam-packed with whod...

Jam-packed with "who'd have thought it?" insights based on his professional data analysis skills, and reams of data, mostly Google searches. A wowser on nearly every page, many which you can't resist sharing. What's the magic age for a person to be for his team's World Series win to make him a lifelong fan? How could you have predicted where Trump would win based on offensive Google searches? Like Freakonomics meets Malcolm Gladwell. Fun!

Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

The biggest appeal of ...

The biggest appeal of books like these for me is finding out all the things that I thought I knew were false. The author shares a great sample of interesting things that illustrate the ways really big data groups can teach us things about ourselves that we didn't know or didn't want to know. This work did make me wonder if I should get off the internet and stay off!


Customer Q&A

Get specific details about this product from customers who own it.

Ask a question

If you would like to share feedback with us about pricing, delivery or other customer service issues, please contact customer service directly.

Policies & Plans

Pricing policy

About our prices
We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything. So if you find a current lower price from an online retailer on an identical, in-stock product, tell us and we'll match it. See more details atOnline Price Match.

webapp branch
Electrode, Comp-f34db931-d9ec-430d-bd87-962cbd70f3b4, DC-wus-prod-a3, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-36.5.0, SHA-1e7e562741c42b3e4340c969ae68540802a9ebd4, CID-6a09444a-007-173d322cb51c1d, Generated: Sun, 09 Aug 2020 12:12:19 GMT