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Divergent

Walmart # 563735826
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Customer Review Snapshot

4.2 out of 5 stars
678 total reviews
5 stars
325
4 stars
213
3 stars
109
2 stars
23
1 star
8
Most helpful positive review
Divergent by Veronica Roth Recommended for people who like: The Hunger Games, Scott Westerfeld's Uglies series, Ender's Game "Genre" Tags: Dystopian, Adventure, Cinematic Style Writing, We Need to Save the World but First We Have to Survive School The Official Summary: In Beatrice Prior's dystopian Chicago, society is divided into five factions, each dedicated to the cultivation of a particular virtue-Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent). On an appointed day of every year, all sixteen-year-olds must select the faction to which they will devote the rest of their lives. For Beatrice, the decision is between staying with her family and being who she really is-she can't have both. So she makes a choice that surprises everyone, including herself. During the highly competitive initiation that follows, Beatrice renames herself Tris and struggles to determine who her friends really are-and where, exactly, a romance with a sometimes fascinating, sometimes infuriating boy fits into the life she's chosen. But Tris also has a secret, one she's kept hidden from everyone because she's been warned it can mean death. And as she discovers a growing conflict that threatens to unravel her seemingly perfect society, she also learns that her secret might help her save those she loves . . . or it might destroy her. Debut author Veronica Roth bursts onto the literary scene with the first book in the Divergent series-dystopian thrillers filled with electrifying decisions, heartbreaking betrayals, stunning consequences, and unexpected romance. Review: I'm going to warn you that this is not going to be like a normal review. I really don't want to spoil anything, especially when the blogosphere did such a good job of not spoiling me. But the book is so well-crafted* that I am going to put on my "Writerly Analysis" hat so I can more thoroughly sing Roth's praises. I am a little behind the rest of the blogging world. Most of the other book bloggers were gushing about this book when it came out two weeks ago. I was in the middle of law school finals. But I went out and got it because every review I saw was gushing about this book- and with good reason! This book is amazing. It starts a little slowly, but that's mostly because the reader follows Beatrice's actions with the thought of "Well, duh. You have to make that choice, or this is going to be a really dull 500 page book." That's just a really, really tiny issue though, and the world is so interesting that the reader can let little things like the first 50 pages of slight indecision slide. Of course, if you're a really character-driven reader, you'll probably love that part, especially as it relates to Beatrice/Tris's later development. By the time I was halfway through the book I was hooked. I couldn't put it down because of the awesome blend of romance and action and stress. And you know what I said about the beginning being a bit predictable, because otherwise there'd be no book? That goes away. Big time. By the time I got to page 300 or so, I was reading and thought to myself, "Oh dear lord. She might just kill off a main character. I think she both could and would." And that terror kept me flipping pages. This book also has what I like to think of as the cinematic writing style. Both Scott Westerfeld's Uglies series and Ender's Game have it- there's a lot of focus on external action and the language is precise and clear. It's really just an extreme form of the old writing mantra of "show don't tell." In this book and Westerfeld's Uglies, the heroines tends to default to action in times of stress because that's where they can kind of connect with their instincts and forcefully go after what they want. A counter-example would be Harry Potter. Though J.K. Rowling is a genius, she spent a lot of time in Harry's head, which is why I think his internal struggle doesn't translate to the screen well. Switching to another of my favorite "Analyze the writing topics," there is another reason to love this book: closure. The story has a definite, satisfying ending! On the cliffhanger scale, this book ends on a "Hm. Well, now we have a vague, massive problem to deal with, but at least we have faced the immediate threat" a la Harry Potter. I can live with that. In fact, I love that. Down with cliffhangers!!! Rating: 5+ stars- Definitely qualifies as one of the best books I've read in 2011. Veronica Roth is amazing (especially when you consider this is her first book! I'm so jealous. It's really jaw-droppingly good) and is being added to my "read everything by this author" list. Other Tangential Thoughts: If you are participating in The Story Siren's 2011 Debut Author Challenge, this book counts! This is Veronica Roth's first novel! Also, according to Good Reads this is the first book in a trilogy. The second and third books are untitled as of yet. If I haven't convinced you, you can read the first 100 pages for free from Veronica's website. *I realize well-crafted is a subjective term. I think it's amazing, largely because there's a central theme about the meaning of strength and courage, but the book is ridiculously engaging for both plot and character-driven readers alike. Once you're done being introduced to the world it's ridiculously well-paced, and the romance is believable (no insta-love, though there is a bit of insta-crushing on both sides ;) )

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Specifications

Series Title
Divergent Series
Publisher
Walmart.Com
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
English
Author
Roth, Veronica
ISBN-13
9780062337085
Publication Date
February, 2014
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
8.00 x 5.25 x 1.50 Inches
ISBN-10
0062337084

Customer Reviews

5 stars
325
4 stars
213
3 stars
109
2 stars
23
1 star
8
Most helpful positive review
3 customers found this helpful
Divergent by Veronica ...
Divergent by Veronica Roth Recommended for people who like: The Hunger Games, Scott Westerfeld's Uglies series, Ender's Game "Genre" Tags: Dystopian, Adventure, Cinematic Style Writing, We Need to Save the World but First We Have to Survive School The Official Summary: In Beatrice Prior's dystopian Chicago, society is divided into five factions, each dedicated to the cultivation of a particular virtue-Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent). On an appointed day of every year, all sixteen-year-olds must select the faction to which they will devote the rest of their lives. For Beatrice, the decision is between staying with her family and being who she really is-she can't have both. So she makes a choice that surprises everyone, including herself. During the highly competitive initiation that follows, Beatrice renames herself Tris and struggles to determine who her friends really are-and where, exactly, a romance with a sometimes fascinating, sometimes infuriating boy fits into the life she's chosen. But Tris also has a secret, one she's kept hidden from everyone because she's been warned it can mean death. And as she discovers a growing conflict that threatens to unravel her seemingly perfect society, she also learns that her secret might help her save those she loves . . . or it might destroy her. Debut author Veronica Roth bursts onto the literary scene with the first book in the Divergent series-dystopian thrillers filled with electrifying decisions, heartbreaking betrayals, stunning consequences, and unexpected romance. Review: I'm going to warn you that this is not going to be like a normal review. I really don't want to spoil anything, especially when the blogosphere did such a good job of not spoiling me. But the book is so well-crafted* that I am going to put on my "Writerly Analysis" hat so I can more thoroughly sing Roth's praises. I am a little behind the rest of the blogging world. Most of the other book bloggers were gushing about this book when it came out two weeks ago. I was in the middle of law school finals. But I went out and got it because every review I saw was gushing about this book- and with good reason! This book is amazing. It starts a little slowly, but that's mostly because the reader follows Beatrice's actions with the thought of "Well, duh. You have to make that choice, or this is going to be a really dull 500 page book." That's just a really, really tiny issue though, and the world is so interesting that the reader can let little things like the first 50 pages of slight indecision slide. Of course, if you're a really character-driven reader, you'll probably love that part, especially as it relates to Beatrice/Tris's later development. By the time I was halfway through the book I was hooked. I couldn't put it down because of the awesome blend of romance and action and stress. And you know what I said about the beginning being a bit predictable, because otherwise there'd be no book? That goes away. Big time. By the time I got to page 300 or so, I was reading and thought to myself, "Oh dear lord. She might just kill off a main character. I think she both could and would." And that terror kept me flipping pages. This book also has what I like to think of as the cinematic writing style. Both Scott Westerfeld's Uglies series and Ender's Game have it- there's a lot of focus on external action and the language is precise and clear. It's really just an extreme form of the old writing mantra of "show don't tell." In this book and Westerfeld's Uglies, the heroines tends to default to action in times of stress because that's where they can kind of connect with their instincts and forcefully go after what they want. A counter-example would be Harry Potter. Though J.K. Rowling is a genius, she spent a lot of time in Harry's head, which is why I think his internal struggle doesn't translate to the screen well. Switching to another of my favorite "Analyze the writing topics," there is another reason to love this book: closure. The story has a definite, satisfying ending! On the cliffhanger scale, this book ends on a "Hm. Well, now we have a vague, massive problem to deal with, but at least we have faced the immediate threat" a la Harry Potter. I can live with that. In fact, I love that. Down with cliffhangers!!! Rating: 5+ stars- Definitely qualifies as one of the best books I've read in 2011. Veronica Roth is amazing (especially when you consider this is her first book! I'm so jealous. It's really jaw-droppingly good) and is being added to my "read everything by this author" list. Other Tangential Thoughts: If you are participating in The Story Siren's 2011 Debut Author Challenge, this book counts! This is Veronica Roth's first novel! Also, according to Good Reads this is the first book in a trilogy. The second and third books are untitled as of yet. If I haven't convinced you, you can read the first 100 pages for free from Veronica's website. *I realize well-crafted is a subjective term. I think it's amazing, largely because there's a central theme about the meaning of strength and courage, but the book is ridiculously engaging for both plot and character-driven readers alike. Once you're done being introduced to the world it's ridiculously well-paced, and the romance is believable (no insta-love, though there is a bit of insta-crushing on both sides ;) )
Most helpful negative review
3 customers found this helpful
This book was recommen...
This book was recommended to me as one to read because I was a fan of The Hunger Games. As a fan of the Hunger Games, this book was boring. The idea itself is quite sound and interesting. Five factions, you have to decide where your loyalties lie and the phrase 'faction before blood' is repeated throughout the book. However despite a strong start all of this disappears as the story becomes a cliched look inside a weak girl's mind as she deals with feelings for a boy she likes but really shouldn't because he's such an anti-social hardass. Beatrice/Tris is inconsistent to me. She starts out as weak, quiet, unassuming and then becomes a witty, arrogant, snarky young girl. If it was mean to be the Dauntless effect, there was no real connection there for me. My biggest issue of the story is that so much is referred to as normal behaviors for certain factions, Candor are honest, Dauntless are daring, etc, but we have absolutely no history on why these factions came into existence. There is just brief mentions that things are different now and the factions are to stop the world becoming what it used to be. But it doesn't specify if this is post-war, or present day, or anything. And the brief mention of the factionless (people who don't get selected or are kicked out of a faction) makes me think that this is where Tris is going to end up, and perhaps rally the factionless together in some renegade fight against those in charge who, again, are not identified too clearly. I found the whole novel predictable. When Beatrice explains the factions at the beginning and notes her family born Abnegation as the extremely polite do-gooder faction who never ask questions and always put others first, and then explains Dauntless as the 'scary' option because they are so fearless, it was screamingly obvious that Beatrice was going to change. The shock was that her brother changed as well, but we don't get a hell of a lot of insight into that. Tris somehow makes it to the top of the leaderboard with all her other Dauntless initiates to her own and to my disbelief. She doesn't get why she's good, and its not explained to the reader. The strained romance between Tris and Four I found utterly unbelievable and awkward to read. And it surprised me how this girl who grew up with such a sheltered life and has never had the social interactions expected of a girl her age manages to act exactly like a teenage girl from a modern day novel. Whenever it was a scene with Four and Tris, I skimmed right past it. I could not care less about them, and the story narrows to become just about the two of them towards the end, so I skimmed a lot of that, too. If you want The Hunger Games without the action, adventure, mystery and unique heroine, then read this book. Otherwise, avoid.
Most helpful positive review
3 customers found this helpful
Divergent by Veronica ...
Divergent by Veronica Roth Recommended for people who like: The Hunger Games, Scott Westerfeld's Uglies series, Ender's Game "Genre" Tags: Dystopian, Adventure, Cinematic Style Writing, We Need to Save the World but First We Have to Survive School The Official Summary: In Beatrice Prior's dystopian Chicago, society is divided into five factions, each dedicated to the cultivation of a particular virtue-Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent). On an appointed day of every year, all sixteen-year-olds must select the faction to which they will devote the rest of their lives. For Beatrice, the decision is between staying with her family and being who she really is-she can't have both. So she makes a choice that surprises everyone, including herself. During the highly competitive initiation that follows, Beatrice renames herself Tris and struggles to determine who her friends really are-and where, exactly, a romance with a sometimes fascinating, sometimes infuriating boy fits into the life she's chosen. But Tris also has a secret, one she's kept hidden from everyone because she's been warned it can mean death. And as she discovers a growing conflict that threatens to unravel her seemingly perfect society, she also learns that her secret might help her save those she loves . . . or it might destroy her. Debut author Veronica Roth bursts onto the literary scene with the first book in the Divergent series-dystopian thrillers filled with electrifying decisions, heartbreaking betrayals, stunning consequences, and unexpected romance. Review: I'm going to warn you that this is not going to be like a normal review. I really don't want to spoil anything, especially when the blogosphere did such a good job of not spoiling me. But the book is so well-crafted* that I am going to put on my "Writerly Analysis" hat so I can more thoroughly sing Roth's praises. I am a little behind the rest of the blogging world. Most of the other book bloggers were gushing about this book when it came out two weeks ago. I was in the middle of law school finals. But I went out and got it because every review I saw was gushing about this book- and with good reason! This book is amazing. It starts a little slowly, but that's mostly because the reader follows Beatrice's actions with the thought of "Well, duh. You have to make that choice, or this is going to be a really dull 500 page book." That's just a really, really tiny issue though, and the world is so interesting that the reader can let little things like the first 50 pages of slight indecision slide. Of course, if you're a really character-driven reader, you'll probably love that part, especially as it relates to Beatrice/Tris's later development. By the time I was halfway through the book I was hooked. I couldn't put it down because of the awesome blend of romance and action and stress. And you know what I said about the beginning being a bit predictable, because otherwise there'd be no book? That goes away. Big time. By the time I got to page 300 or so, I was reading and thought to myself, "Oh dear lord. She might just kill off a main character. I think she both could and would." And that terror kept me flipping pages. This book also has what I like to think of as the cinematic writing style. Both Scott Westerfeld's Uglies series and Ender's Game have it- there's a lot of focus on external action and the language is precise and clear. It's really just an extreme form of the old writing mantra of "show don't tell." In this book and Westerfeld's Uglies, the heroines tends to default to action in times of stress because that's where they can kind of connect with their instincts and forcefully go after what they want. A counter-example would be Harry Potter. Though J.K. Rowling is a genius, she spent a lot of time in Harry's head, which is why I think his internal struggle doesn't translate to the screen well. Switching to another of my favorite "Analyze the writing topics," there is another reason to love this book: closure. The story has a definite, satisfying ending! On the cliffhanger scale, this book ends on a "Hm. Well, now we have a vague, massive problem to deal with, but at least we have faced the immediate threat" a la Harry Potter. I can live with that. In fact, I love that. Down with cliffhangers!!! Rating: 5+ stars- Definitely qualifies as one of the best books I've read in 2011. Veronica Roth is amazing (especially when you consider this is her first book! I'm so jealous. It's really jaw-droppingly good) and is being added to my "read everything by this author" list. Other Tangential Thoughts: If you are participating in The Story Siren's 2011 Debut Author Challenge, this book counts! This is Veronica Roth's first novel! Also, according to Good Reads this is the first book in a trilogy. The second and third books are untitled as of yet. If I haven't convinced you, you can read the first 100 pages for free from Veronica's website. *I realize well-crafted is a subjective term. I think it's amazing, largely because there's a central theme about the meaning of strength and courage, but the book is ridiculously engaging for both plot and character-driven readers alike. Once you're done being introduced to the world it's ridiculously well-paced, and the romance is believable (no insta-love, though there is a bit of insta-crushing on both sides ;) )
Most helpful negative review
3 customers found this helpful
This book was recommen...
This book was recommended to me as one to read because I was a fan of The Hunger Games. As a fan of the Hunger Games, this book was boring. The idea itself is quite sound and interesting. Five factions, you have to decide where your loyalties lie and the phrase 'faction before blood' is repeated throughout the book. However despite a strong start all of this disappears as the story becomes a cliched look inside a weak girl's mind as she deals with feelings for a boy she likes but really shouldn't because he's such an anti-social hardass. Beatrice/Tris is inconsistent to me. She starts out as weak, quiet, unassuming and then becomes a witty, arrogant, snarky young girl. If it was mean to be the Dauntless effect, there was no real connection there for me. My biggest issue of the story is that so much is referred to as normal behaviors for certain factions, Candor are honest, Dauntless are daring, etc, but we have absolutely no history on why these factions came into existence. There is just brief mentions that things are different now and the factions are to stop the world becoming what it used to be. But it doesn't specify if this is post-war, or present day, or anything. And the brief mention of the factionless (people who don't get selected or are kicked out of a faction) makes me think that this is where Tris is going to end up, and perhaps rally the factionless together in some renegade fight against those in charge who, again, are not identified too clearly. I found the whole novel predictable. When Beatrice explains the factions at the beginning and notes her family born Abnegation as the extremely polite do-gooder faction who never ask questions and always put others first, and then explains Dauntless as the 'scary' option because they are so fearless, it was screamingly obvious that Beatrice was going to change. The shock was that her brother changed as well, but we don't get a hell of a lot of insight into that. Tris somehow makes it to the top of the leaderboard with all her other Dauntless initiates to her own and to my disbelief. She doesn't get why she's good, and its not explained to the reader. The strained romance between Tris and Four I found utterly unbelievable and awkward to read. And it surprised me how this girl who grew up with such a sheltered life and has never had the social interactions expected of a girl her age manages to act exactly like a teenage girl from a modern day novel. Whenever it was a scene with Four and Tris, I skimmed right past it. I could not care less about them, and the story narrows to become just about the two of them towards the end, so I skimmed a lot of that, too. If you want The Hunger Games without the action, adventure, mystery and unique heroine, then read this book. Otherwise, avoid.
1-5 of 678 reviews

Divergent by Veronica ...

Divergent by Veronica Roth is a dystopian story set in Chicago in a future that finds the people divided into factions, and each child, at the age of sixteen takes an aptitude test that helps them decide which faction they should choose to join. Sixteen year old Beatrice knows that she doesn't belong to the selfless Abnegation faction that she has been raised into, she has always been drawn to the fearless Dauntless faction. But choosing a different faction means turning her back on her family, as in this world faction comes before blood. From the moment I opened this book I was captured by both the story and setting, but what made this book so superior for me were the characters. Beatrice or "Tris" as she becomes known is a small, skinny, flat-chested girl with a huge heart and courage to spare that I immediately liked. The other main character, Tobias is revealed to us more slowly, yet still comes off as a complete character, with his flaws, secrets and heroism revealed layer by layer. The first story of a planned trilogy, Divergent sets the scene and tone for what is to follow. With non-stop action, great plot building and interesting moral choices for the characters to make, this story comes alive on the pages. We have the added bonus of a burgeoning love story between Tris and Tobias, which the author handles both lightly and deftly. Divergent is a YA read that shows these characters taking charge of their lives, making snap decisions that will reverberate through the rest of the trilogy as they learn how to set new rules for this changing world that they live in. I am looking forward to following these characters into their future.

Divergent is a dystopi...

Divergent is a dystopian novel set in a world where humans have divided into five factions that co-exist peacefully, each faction taking charge of one function of government or society. At the age of 16, each person makes the most important choice of their life: which faction to join. Factions are based on which trait one most values: bravery, selflessness, intelligence, honesty, or kindness. Once a person has chosen a faction, the faction is expected to hold the foremost place in their loyalties, even before their family. Beatrice Prior has grown up in Abnegation, the selfless faction which controls the government (because of their selflessness, they are seen as uncorruptible), but Tris doesn't feel like she is selfless enough to spend her life in Abnegation. She struggles with the thought of leaving everything and everyone she has ever known, but choosing her faction is only the first challenge that awaits her. After choosing a faction, teens must pass Initiation -- different for each faction, but challenging and sometimes dangerous. To top it off, Tris may be even more different than she originally suspected . . . and she lives in a world where such differences can get her killed. This tightly-plotted story will grab readers' attention, pull them in, rush them through heart-pounding action, and leave them breathlessly wanting more. The author doesn't pull any punches, either: Tris's danger feels raw and realistic. The characters are strong and complex, and there's just enough romance to add interest to the story without taking over the central plot. Fans of The Hunger Games will love this book.

Divergent is a dystopi...

Divergent is a dystopian novel set in a world where humans have divided into five factions that co-exist peacefully, each faction taking charge of one function of government or society. At the age of 16, each person makes the most important choice of their life: which faction to join. Factions are based on which trait one most values: bravery, selflessness, intelligence, honesty, or kindness. Once a person has chosen a faction, the faction is expected to hold the foremost place in their loyalties, even before their family. Beatrice Prior has grown up in Abnegation, the selfless faction which controls the government (because of their selflessness, they are seen as uncorruptible), but Tris doesn't feel like she is selfless enough to spend her life in Abnegation. She struggles with the thought of leaving everything and everyone she has ever known, but choosing her faction is only the first challenge that awaits her. After choosing a faction, teens must pass Initiation -- different for each faction, but challenging and sometimes dangerous. To top it off, Tris may be even more different than she originally suspected . . . and she lives in a world where such differences can get her killed. This tightly-plotted story will grab readers' attention, pull them in, rush them through heart-pounding action, and leave them breathlessly wanting more. The author doesn't pull any punches, either: Tris's danger feels raw and realistic. The characters are strong and complex, and there's just enough romance to add interest to the story without taking over the central plot. Fans of The Hunger Games will love this book.

I saw the trailer for ...

I saw the trailer for this movie before I realized it was a literary trilogy. So I bought the book the same day and finished reading within three days. A page turner that did not disappoint. The story of a future world divided into five factions is thought-provoking to say the least. And the choices that each person makes will either make or break their personal futures. When Beatrice Prior is tested along with countless other teens, her results are not what is expected. Her test administrator tells her, in whispers, that she is what is known as a Divergent - meaning she has capabilities that the Union (the new world order) may kill her for possessing. And when she chooses the Dauntless faction over her home faction of Abnegation, she finds her true self while uncovering sinister plots and conspiracies. Along the way she makes friends with two of her fellow initiates and finds romance with Four, one of the initiate instructors. What follows is a roller-coaster ride of failure and success and the uncovering of family secrets long held. This first book of the Divergent trilogy ends with the beginnings of war - a war that has been instigated by people who are fed up with the way the Union is run and who want to take control into their own hands. But is this revolution going to produce a better world or will it end up with one faction ruling the others? Divergent is a face-paced thriller with characters that are complex and simple at the same time. A blend of physical strength and deep intelligence marks Tris and Four as the forerunners of the resistance in much the same way as Katniss Everdeen of Hunger Games. Fast-moving action will keep you turning the pages long after bedtime.

I thoroughly enjoyed t...

I thoroughly enjoyed this first book in the "Divergent" trilogy. The main character reminded me of the heroine in "The Hunger Games" and the plot about a dystopian society was also in the same vein. However, that did not detract at all from my enjoyment of "Divergent" in its own right. The concept of a society divided by factions was quite captivating for me. I kept wondering where I would fit in the faction system... Am I courageous, peaceful, smart, honest, selfless?? Younger and older readers alike can see parts of themselves in the very believable characters that Roth paints. I really liked the protagonist and I am a fan of YA authors increasing the strength of the female leads of recent novels. All in all, I really loved this book. It was indeed a page turner. I stayed up late reading when I should have been sleeping (I am NOT the intended YA audience and need my beauty rest!). I will be heading to the bookstore soon to pick up the second novel in the series.

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Electrode, Comp-389271334, DC-prod-cdc03, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-30.0.0, SHA-4c05261de7b7524702d8d137579365498522abc0, CID-6befd1ab-402-16df1d82422c6a, Generated: Tue, 22 Oct 2019 05:02:17 GMT