Rachel Kushner

De vlammenwerpers - eBook

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<p>De jonge kunstenares Reno komt in 1975 naar New York met de droom om uit haar fascinatie met snelheid en motoren kunst te maken. New York is in die jaren een opwindende stad, levend, vol, druk en gevaarlijk, waar de grenzen tussen performance en het echte leven vervagen. Door haar affaire met de kunstenaar Sandro Valera, telg uit een rijke Italiaanse familie die een motorenfabriek bezit, belandt Reno bij de kunstenaarselite van New York, en uiteindelijk in Itali&euml;, waar ze verwikkeld raakt in de radicale politieke beweging die dat land teistert.</p>

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De jonge kunstenares Reno komt in 1975 naar New York met de droom om uit haar fascinatie met snelheid en motoren kunst te maken. New York is in die jaren een opwindende stad, levend, vol, druk en gevaarlijk, waar de grenzen tussen performance en het echte leven vervagen. Door haar affaire met de kunstenaar Sandro Valera, telg uit een rijke Italiaanse familie die een motorenfabriek bezit, belandt Reno bij de kunstenaarselite van New York, en uiteindelijk in Italië, waar ze verwikkeld raakt in de radicale politieke beweging die dat land teistert.

De vlammenwerpers - eBook

Specifications

Read This On
Android,Ereader,Desktop,IOS,Windows
Is Downloadable Content Available
Y
Digital Reader Format
Epub (Watermark),Epub (Yes)
Language
nl
Publisher
Atlas Contact, Uitgeverij
Author
Rachel Kushner
ISBN-13
9789025443214
ISBN-10
9025443214

Customer Reviews

Average Rating:(3.3)out of 5 stars
5 stars
3
4 stars
16
3 stars
12
2 stars
10
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
The Flamethrowers is t...
The Flamethrowers is the kind of book I can see myself reading again. Most of the beginning of the book takes place in Nevada. It takes its time to create a mood, to lay out some imagery and ideas, and to introduce the main character, whose real name we never learn. Then the story moves to New York and the plot picks up, going from tiny spare apartments to cheap coffee shops to art world dinner parties. The setting then shifts to a posh villa in the Italian countryside, then to a chaotic political demonstration, and then back to New York. Along the way we meet racers and would-be racers, artists and would-be artists, lovers and would-be lovers. If that were all you got out of the book-the colorful people and places and things that happen-that would be enough to make this worth reading. But The Flamethrowers is much more than that. It's an ambitious, expansive novel that asks big questions. What does it mean to be authentic? Who decides? Does it matter? What has more value-the idea of something, or the thing itself? Is your life your own creation, or is it to some degree determined by where you come from-a fate you can't entirely control or escape? Where do you draw the line between real experience and just playing at something, experiencing a fantasy of it? Does money and privilege separate you from real experience or allow you to choose your experience? What makes one experience any more valid than another? And what about taking risks and breaking rules? Where do the rules come from? There's a great thrill, and often real danger, in breaking the rules. When you break the rules, you feel alive because you take control-you feel like you are writing your own story. Note: I received an ARC of this book through a Goodreads giveaway.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
Well, I have been read...
Well, I have been reading this book for some time now, and still haven't managed to make my way though it. It is tedious and rambling. The idea of this book turns out to be much more interesting than the actual book itself. I was looking forward to reading about the New York art scene in the late seventies with a dash of European glamor thrown in. This just didn't deliver. Much better books keep drawing me away so I am finally going to give up.
Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
The Flamethrowers is t...
The Flamethrowers is the kind of book I can see myself reading again. Most of the beginning of the book takes place in Nevada. It takes its time to create a mood, to lay out some imagery and ideas, and to introduce the main character, whose real name we never learn. Then the story moves to New York and the plot picks up, going from tiny spare apartments to cheap coffee shops to art world dinner parties. The setting then shifts to a posh villa in the Italian countryside, then to a chaotic political demonstration, and then back to New York. Along the way we meet racers and would-be racers, artists and would-be artists, lovers and would-be lovers. If that were all you got out of the book-the colorful people and places and things that happen-that would be enough to make this worth reading. But The Flamethrowers is much more than that. It's an ambitious, expansive novel that asks big questions. What does it mean to be authentic? Who decides? Does it matter? What has more value-the idea of something, or the thing itself? Is your life your own creation, or is it to some degree determined by where you come from-a fate you can't entirely control or escape? Where do you draw the line between real experience and just playing at something, experiencing a fantasy of it? Does money and privilege separate you from real experience or allow you to choose your experience? What makes one experience any more valid than another? And what about taking risks and breaking rules? Where do the rules come from? There's a great thrill, and often real danger, in breaking the rules. When you break the rules, you feel alive because you take control-you feel like you are writing your own story. Note: I received an ARC of this book through a Goodreads giveaway.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(2.0)out of 5 stars
Well, I have been read...
Well, I have been reading this book for some time now, and still haven't managed to make my way though it. It is tedious and rambling. The idea of this book turns out to be much more interesting than the actual book itself. I was looking forward to reading about the New York art scene in the late seventies with a dash of European glamor thrown in. This just didn't deliver. Much better books keep drawing me away so I am finally going to give up.
The Flamethrowers is the kind of book I can see myself reading again. Most of the beginning of the book takes place in Nevada. It takes its time to create a mood, to lay out some imagery and ideas, and to introduce the main character, whose real name we never learn. Then the story moves to New York and the plot picks up, going from tiny spare apartments to cheap coffee shops to art world dinner parties. The setting then shifts to a posh villa in the Italian countryside, then to a chaotic political demonstration, and then back to New York. Along the way we meet racers and would-be racers, artists and would-be artists, lovers and would-be lovers. If that were all you got out of the book-the colorful people and places and things that happen-that would be enough to make this worth reading. But The Flamethrowers is much more than that. It's an ambitious, expansive novel that asks big questions. What does it mean to be authentic? Who decides? Does it matter? What has more value-the idea of something, or the thing itself? Is your life your own creation, or is it to some degree determined by where you come from-a fate you can't entirely control or escape? Where do you draw the line between real experience and just playing at something, experiencing a fantasy of it? Does money and privilege separate you from real experience or allow you to choose your experience? What makes one experience any more valid than another? And what about taking risks and breaking rules? Where do the rules come from? There's a great thrill, and often real danger, in breaking the rules. When you break the rules, you feel alive because you take control-you feel like you are writing your own story. Note: I received an ARC of this book through a Goodreads giveaway.
Well, I have been reading this book for some time now, and still haven't managed to make my way though it. It is tedious and rambling. The idea of this book turns out to be much more interesting than the actual book itself. I was looking forward to reading about the New York art scene in the late seventies with a dash of European glamor thrown in. This just didn't deliver. Much better books keep drawing me away so I am finally going to give up.

Frequent mentions

1-5 of 41 reviews
Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Kushner has taken an i...

Kushner has taken an intriguingly disparate set of subjects - the New York art world, the world of land speed records and the political unrest of 70s Italy, and woven them into the rites of passage story of a girl from Nevada nicknamed Reno and her initiation into the Bohemian milieu of New York, where she meets Sandro, an artist who has largely rejected his part in the family business that has made him rich. Reno is something of a blank cipher whose actions lead her into situations quite passively, but the set pieces are vivid and brilliantly painted. I was left wondering how many of the component stories were factual and how much was imagined, but it adds up to an impressive and readable whole.

Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Most of my friends hat...

Most of my friends hated this book. They were there how dare she write about it. But I think this had one of the strongest openings of any book I have read in years. I loved it. The language was precise but lyrical and the seamlessness of the art and the metaphor , the way speed and danger were interwoven was immaculate. My worry was could she sustain it and she couldn't although the book is still brilliant. It turned into a triangle romance and while it was good the art world aspect somehow receded in its power and we were left with a book that didn't break out of that mold. Still she can do these big scenes with all these characters and the fascinating "I' in the middle. Have to go back and study how she did it. I also personally loved her use of the pictoral as inspiration.

Average Rating:(4.0)out of 5 stars

Just finished the last...

Just finished the last of the five free books I brought home from the ALA midwinter conference. The FlamethrowersThe DinnerAnd SonsThe Woman UpstairsIn the House upon the Dirt between the Lake and the WoodsThe Flamethrowers was the best of the bunch.

Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

Rachel Kushners The F...

Rachel Kushner's The Flamethrowers is one of the most talked-about novels of the past twelve months. Although I haven't been reading much literary fiction lately, I was impressed by this book's excellent reviews and decided to give it a shot. Set in 1970s New York and Rome, The Flamethrowers has a strong historical and political bent-yet much of the novel's details are fictional. It begins with narrator Reno traveling to Utah to race her Moto Valera bike across the desert and photograph the tracks left behind in the sand. Reno, an impressionable 21-year-old artist, has joined the vibrant New York art scene and has an older, influential boyfriend, Sandro Valera, who has gifted her the motorcycle. After crashing her bike during her land speed trial, Reno falls in with the Valera team, and they invite her to join them in Italy later in the year to race again. While in Italy (with Sandro), Reno inadvertently gets involved with a group of radicals who may or may not be involved in the abduction of Sandro's older brother and owner of Valera motorcycles. The Flamethrowers is rife with details and stories. It calls out the misogyny of the '70s New York art scene. It seamlessly intertwines history with story (although the novel overall has little straightforward "plot"), including the radical backgrounds and made-up stories told by many of the minor characters. It is funny and vibrant, and the prose is stunning; Kushner brings scenes beautifully to life with her words. And, beneath all of that, there is the story of Reno, a young woman navigating her way in a misogynistic art world, falling in love and having her heart broken. With its many layers, vivid settings, and radical characters, The Flamethrowers is an outstandingly crafted novel and definitely one worth reading.

Average Rating:(3.0)out of 5 stars

This was beautifully w...

This was beautifully written, but the story itself was slow and downright dragged in places. The narrator seemed so detached from the events she described that it was hard to grasp any sort of depth of her character. Flamethrowers doesn't really shine because of the storytelling, but Kushner's talent still made this an overall enjoyable read.


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