Generated at Mon, 11 Nov 2019 19:25:52 GMT exp-ck: undefined; xpa: Lmu-J;
Electrode, Comp-701261211, DC-prod-cdc02, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-19.1.31, SHA-771c9ce79737366b1d5f53d21cad4086bf722e21, CID-b123198b-afa-16e5bedf66f664, Generated: Mon, 11 Nov 2019 19:25:52 GMT

Beijing Bastard: Into the Wilds of a Changing China

$36.16$36.16
Out of stock
Delivery not available
Pickup not available

Sold & shipped byBooks Direct
Beijing Bastard: Into the Wilds of a Changing China

Customer Review Snapshot

3.2 out of 5 stars
10 total reviews
5 stars
0
4 stars
3
3 stars
6
2 stars
1
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
I really enjoyed this book. It's your typical coming-of-age type story that most people have probably lived and relate to in some form or another---surely we have all experienced the feeling of being suffocated under your family's hopes for you, and that urge to stretch your wings and fly independently, to see the world, to have an adventure. I went to Europe. Ms. Wang went to China. There isn't much too the story itself. It's the people in the stories that make this book so endearing. From the haircutting troops to the family of Opera performers to the bohemian expat community, the characters are intriguing and interesting, comical and at times caricature-ish. All are easily likable and all have interesting things to add to the book, and make it unique. Ms. Wang may not have finished her documentary she hoped to film, but she did write a great book. She paints such a loving portrait of a changing China and it's people that a film would be almost superfluous. This book really won't help you better understand China. But it will give you a glimpse into Chinese culture and the gritty reality of Beijing, introduce you to some great characters, and give you a sense of empathy for these people caught in the wind between old and new.

About This Item

We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it.
Beijing Bastard: Into the Wilds of a Changing China Raised in a strict Chinese-American household, Val Wang dutifully got good grades, took piano lessons, and performed in a Chinese dance troupe-until she shaved her head and became a leftist. But Val's true mutiny was when she moved to China, the land her parents had fled. In 1998, Val arrives in Beijing expecting to find freedom . . . but she finds her traditional relatives instead. She discovers a city rebelling against its roots, struggling to find a new, modern identity like her. A thriving avant-garde subculture makes art out of the chaos in Beijing's gritty outskirts. Brilliantly observed and winningly told, Beijing Bastard is a compelling story of a young woman finding her place in the world and of China, as its ancient past gives way to a dazzling but uncertain future.

Specifications

Publisher
Tantor Media Inc
Book Format
@generated
Author
Wang, Val, Zeller, Emily Woo
ISBN-13
9781494506346
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
6.25 x 5.50 x 1.00 Inches
ISBN-10
1494506343

Customer Reviews

5 stars
0
4 stars
3
3 stars
6
2 stars
1
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
I really enjoyed this ...
I really enjoyed this book. It's your typical coming-of-age type story that most people have probably lived and relate to in some form or another---surely we have all experienced the feeling of being suffocated under your family's hopes for you, and that urge to stretch your wings and fly independently, to see the world, to have an adventure. I went to Europe. Ms. Wang went to China. There isn't much too the story itself. It's the people in the stories that make this book so endearing. From the haircutting troops to the family of Opera performers to the bohemian expat community, the characters are intriguing and interesting, comical and at times caricature-ish. All are easily likable and all have interesting things to add to the book, and make it unique. Ms. Wang may not have finished her documentary she hoped to film, but she did write a great book. She paints such a loving portrait of a changing China and it's people that a film would be almost superfluous. This book really won't help you better understand China. But it will give you a glimpse into Chinese culture and the gritty reality of Beijing, introduce you to some great characters, and give you a sense of empathy for these people caught in the wind between old and new.
Most helpful negative review
I wanted so much to li...
I wanted so much to like this book. I overlooked the title and dived right in. It did have some bad language strewn throughout, however, I kept reading. I kept reading hoping to find Val reconnecting with her family in China and learning a great deal about them and growing to love them and understand them better. This was not what I had found; what I did find was Val not really doing much of anything. She was pretty selfish and confused about herself and her future. Towards the end of the book I keep hoping that maybe, just maybe, she would end the book on some great realization or epiphany, however, that wasn't the case either. I feel like maybe she still is unhappy in her life even now. There was not much information about her life in the present, or her family, to give me any sense of closure on her memoir. The best thing about the book though, was that she consistently throughout would throw in a Chinese word with it's English meaning. I really like seeing that in books of this type. In that way, you can really get the sense of something in the Chinese way and not an American way. Being a Chinese language student; I really appreciated that extra added touch to her writing.
Most helpful positive review
I really enjoyed this ...
I really enjoyed this book. It's your typical coming-of-age type story that most people have probably lived and relate to in some form or another---surely we have all experienced the feeling of being suffocated under your family's hopes for you, and that urge to stretch your wings and fly independently, to see the world, to have an adventure. I went to Europe. Ms. Wang went to China. There isn't much too the story itself. It's the people in the stories that make this book so endearing. From the haircutting troops to the family of Opera performers to the bohemian expat community, the characters are intriguing and interesting, comical and at times caricature-ish. All are easily likable and all have interesting things to add to the book, and make it unique. Ms. Wang may not have finished her documentary she hoped to film, but she did write a great book. She paints such a loving portrait of a changing China and it's people that a film would be almost superfluous. This book really won't help you better understand China. But it will give you a glimpse into Chinese culture and the gritty reality of Beijing, introduce you to some great characters, and give you a sense of empathy for these people caught in the wind between old and new.
Most helpful negative review
I wanted so much to li...
I wanted so much to like this book. I overlooked the title and dived right in. It did have some bad language strewn throughout, however, I kept reading. I kept reading hoping to find Val reconnecting with her family in China and learning a great deal about them and growing to love them and understand them better. This was not what I had found; what I did find was Val not really doing much of anything. She was pretty selfish and confused about herself and her future. Towards the end of the book I keep hoping that maybe, just maybe, she would end the book on some great realization or epiphany, however, that wasn't the case either. I feel like maybe she still is unhappy in her life even now. There was not much information about her life in the present, or her family, to give me any sense of closure on her memoir. The best thing about the book though, was that she consistently throughout would throw in a Chinese word with it's English meaning. I really like seeing that in books of this type. In that way, you can really get the sense of something in the Chinese way and not an American way. Being a Chinese language student; I really appreciated that extra added touch to her writing.
1-5 of 10 reviews

I have to admit, I lov...

I have to admit, I love the idea of finding yourself by going back to the place that your parents fled. While that may not have been the actual reason for Wang to go back to China, it certainly seemed to be what she got out of it. I listened to the audiobook, read by Emily Woo Zeller, who's voice was familiar from when I listened to The Girl Who Wrote Loneliness last year.There's actually a lot to love in this book. As with Najla Said in Looking for Palestine, Wang grows up stuck between the culture she is growing up in and the culture her parents are pushing upon her. She is dragged to Chinese school, told what Chinese do, and doesn't seem to ever quite feel Chinese. She's Chinese-American, which seems to become an ever greater distinction as other try to force her identity onto her rather than let her identify herself.I've been through a little of that too as people have tried to tell me just how Hispanic I am and what I should or shouldn't do on account of it. I've tried to gently remind them that there is this whole other half of me and that perhaps Hispanics are more nuanced they are giving themselves credit for (the person, not all Hispanics because this only seems to happen with people who think we should all be some monolithic group that all dance perfectly, among other things). Nevertheless, I have never gone back to Cuba, where my mother is from, but I would only hope for a similar kind of experience.While in China, for reasons that are more a gut feeling than rational, Wang realizes quite a bit about her family, where they came from, what they ran from, and why they are the way they are. She seems to get there just in time as China begins to capitalize and modernize. While the exact China of her parents' past was already gone, trampled under 50 years of communist regime, she gets to look in and see  a part of what made their culture and lifestyle so different from life in the US and a little of why they worked so hard to preserve it.My favorite part about stories like this, that start in the US and involve traveling to parental homes abroad, is that it tends to have the same feel of a hero's journey into an unknown world in science fiction or fantasy. The lone hero embarks upon an adventure of discovery into a culture that is new to their lived experience, maybe they've learned something about them, maybe not. Either way, the lived experience is entirely different and the awkward moments of figuring out what's normal and who's taking advantage of you and what isn't normal is all fun to read about.I loved the way her views on her parents and China and Chinese culture and different kinds of attachments evolve throughout the book. At my age now, and reading through books like this, I have to wonder if we all cringe at the thought of what our 20 year old selves thought and did and thought our lives were going to be like. Big ideas and no idea how to get there.For me, the most poignant moment can be summed up in a line she quotes from an interview:His history, after all, is mine too.I suppose that's true for us all. Our parents are a part of our history, and what they went through is a part of how they raised us.

Im not really sure wh...

I'm not really sure what to say about this book. There were a lot of contradictions to take in. Ms. Wang leaves a typical suburban home in America in order to simultaneously distance herself from her family and reconnect with their history in China. While there she works hard a a journalist and translator, but also spends a lot of time carousing and getting into weird scrapes with her friends. In the end, this book read more like a liberal-arts student recounting her "wild-n-crazy" college experiences than it did like an expat's foreign memoir. It was fun and entertaining while it lasted, but already I am having trouble recalling enough about the book to write a decent review.

I really enjoyed this ...

I really enjoyed this book. It's your typical coming-of-age type story that most people have probably lived and relate to in some form or another---surely we have all experienced the feeling of being suffocated under your family's hopes for you, and that urge to stretch your wings and fly independently, to see the world, to have an adventure. I went to Europe. Ms. Wang went to China. There isn't much too the story itself. It's the people in the stories that make this book so endearing. From the haircutting troops to the family of Opera performers to the bohemian expat community, the characters are intriguing and interesting, comical and at times caricature-ish. All are easily likable and all have interesting things to add to the book, and make it unique. Ms. Wang may not have finished her documentary she hoped to film, but she did write a great book. She paints such a loving portrait of a changing China and it's people that a film would be almost superfluous. This book really won't help you better understand China. But it will give you a glimpse into Chinese culture and the gritty reality of Beijing, introduce you to some great characters, and give you a sense of empathy for these people caught in the wind between old and new.

A not particularly inv...

A not particularly involving book. Ms. Wang's story is that of one searching for her identity, as a woman, and as one torn between her identity as a modern, educated, liberated woman, and one confused as to what her Chinese heritage actually means. The portraits she paints of the people she meets in China aren't very interesting as the author fails to link their stories to the larger changes the country is experiencing. Perhaps it's unfair to expect her individual character sketches to coalesce into something more meaningful. Absent that, her book just becomes pedestrian quality writing in search of a theme.

A not particularly inv...

A not particularly involving book. Ms. Wang's story is that of one searching for her identity, as a woman, and as one torn between her identity as a modern, educated, liberated woman, and one confused as to what her Chinese heritage actually means. The portraits she paints of the people she meets in China aren't very interesting as the author fails to link their stories to the larger changes the country is experiencing. Perhaps it's unfair to expect her individual character sketches to coalesce into something more meaningful. Absent that, her book just becomes pedestrian quality writing in search of a theme.

Customer Q&A

Get specific details about this product from customers who own it.

Policies & Plans

Pricing policy

About our prices
We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything. So if you find a current lower price from an online retailer on an identical, in-stock product, tell us and we'll match it. See more details atOnline Price Match.
webapp branch
Electrode, Comp-389266856, DC-prod-cdc02, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-30.0.3, SHA-fe0221a6ef49da0ab2505dfeca6fe7a05293b900, CID-b0f30346-546-16e5bf4582a9a8, Generated: Mon, 11 Nov 2019 19:32:50 GMT