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Before We Were Free

Walmart # 558420462

Before We Were Free

Walmart # 558420462
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9780440237846

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9780440237846 Publishers Weekly,In her first YA novel, Alvarez (How the Garc!a Girls Lost Their Accents) proves as gifted at writing for adolescents as she is for adults. Here she brings her warmth, sensitivity and eye for detail to a volatile setting the Dominican Republic of her childhood, during the 1960-1961 attempt to overthrow Trujillo's dictatorship. The story opens as 12-year-old narrator Anita watches her cousins, the Garc!a girls, abruptly leave for the U.S. with their parents; Anita's own immediate family are now the only ones occupying the extended family's compound. Alvarez relays the terrors of the Trujillo regime in a muted but unmistakable tone; for a while, Anita's parents protect her (and, by extension, readers), both from the ruler's criminal and even murderous ways and also from knowledge of their involvement in the planned coup d'tat. The perspective remains securely Anita's, and Alvarez's pitch-perfect narration will immerse readers in Anita's world. Her crush on the American boy next door is at first as important as knowing that the maid is almost certainly working for the secret police and spying on them; later, as Anita understands the implications of the adult remarks she overhears, her voice becomes anxious and the tension mounts. When the revolution fails, Anita's father and uncle are immediately arrested, and she and her mother go underground, living in secret in their friends' bedroom closet a sequence the author renders with palpable suspense. Alvarez conveys the hopeful ending with as much passion as suffuses the tragedies that precede it. A stirring work of art. Ages 12-up. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Specifications

Series Title
Laurel-Leaf Books Readers Circle
Publisher
Random House Childrens Books
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
183
Author
Alvarez, Julia
ISBN-13
9780440237846
Publication Date
April, 2004
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
6.75 x 4.25 x 0.75 Inches
ISBN-10
044023784X
Customer Reviews
3.9
16 reviews
5 stars
5
4 stars
7
3 stars
2
2 stars
2
1 star
0
Top Positive Review
Set in the Dominican Repu
Set in the Dominican Republic in the 1960s, this novel tells the story of a young girl whose family lives under the repressive rule of General Trujillo. Over the course of the book it becomes increasingly obvious that her family members are involved in resistance against the dictator, who feels free to take anything or anyone he desires. The family's fear for their daughter's safety when General Trujillo admires her and the increasing net that is drawn around the family as they attempt to wrest their country from the hands of the dictator are vivid and compelling, and for younger kids the pictures painted here may be too frighteningly realistic to be appealing. For older kids, though, Alvarez paints a thought-provoking and haunting portrait of a family living under a dictator. The book will lead to discussions about freedom, dictatorship, and repression, and will give kids a good sense of what it means to live in a repressive society. Highly recommended.
Top Negative Review
This is a young adult nov
This is a young adult novel about a 12-year-old girl who, with most of her family, narrowly escapes the brutal dictatorship in the Dominican Republic in the early 1960s that many of her relatives actively seek to overthrow. It's a sometimes moving but often sentimental account that seems to me to talk down to its young readers.
Top Positive Review
Set in the Dominican Repu
Set in the Dominican Republic in the 1960s, this novel tells the story of a young girl whose family lives under the repressive rule of General Trujillo. Over the course of the book it becomes increasingly obvious that her family members are involved in resistance against the dictator, who feels free to take anything or anyone he desires. The family's fear for their daughter's safety when General Trujillo admires her and the increasing net that is drawn around the family as they attempt to wrest their country from the hands of the dictator are vivid and compelling, and for younger kids the pictures painted here may be too frighteningly realistic to be appealing. For older kids, though, Alvarez paints a thought-provoking and haunting portrait of a family living under a dictator. The book will lead to discussions about freedom, dictatorship, and repression, and will give kids a good sense of what it means to live in a repressive society. Highly recommended.
Top Negative Review
This is a young adult nov
This is a young adult novel about a 12-year-old girl who, with most of her family, narrowly escapes the brutal dictatorship in the Dominican Republic in the early 1960s that many of her relatives actively seek to overthrow. It's a sometimes moving but often sentimental account that seems to me to talk down to its young readers.
1-5 of 16 reviews

Set in the Dominican Repu

Set in the Dominican Republic in the 1960s, this novel tells the story of a young girl whose family lives under the repressive rule of General Trujillo. Over the course of the book it becomes increasingly obvious that her family members are involved in resistance against the dictator, who feels free to take anything or anyone he desires. The family's fear for their daughter's safety when General Trujillo admires her and the increasing net that is drawn around the family as they attempt to wrest their country from the hands of the dictator are vivid and compelling, and for younger kids the pictures painted here may be too frighteningly realistic to be appealing. For older kids, though, Alvarez paints a thought-provoking and haunting portrait of a family living under a dictator. The book will lead to discussions about freedom, dictatorship, and repression, and will give kids a good sense of what it means to live in a repressive society. Highly recommended.

A poignant, thought-provo

A poignant, thought-provoking novel that will easily lend itself to a good discussion. I'm glad that I picked it for this month's MIP Book Club. Anita is almost 12 years old and living in the Dominican Republic. Some of her extended family has left for the United States but she and her nuclear family are determined to stay, even though the dictator is becoming more and more ruthless. While learning more about local politics, Anita is also moving from adolescence into womanhood. Her struggles, both internal and external, make for a moving book. Highly recommended to all.

A first person narrative

A first person narrative through the political upheaval of the Dominican Republic in the 1960s. Anita Powerful storytelling that puts you in the midst of her struggles, loss, fears, hopes and dreams. A must read! Used to teach overcoming struggle and difficult times. Also helpful to teach writing as a means to process and attempt to understand your struggles.

This little volume explor

This little volume explores how Anita (12 going on womanhood) feels as her family struggles to survive the revolution to overthrow the Trujillo regime in the Dominican Republic. Her view is simplistic and focused on the realities of her familial experience - colored with the emotion of first love and the adoration of a child for her father. I've read Alvarez before, and so far I like this book best. It's not quite as powerful as [The Diary of a Young Girl] by Anne Frank, but it's a very good book re the Dominican experience under Trujillo. Recommended for young adults.

This is the story of a yo

This is the story of a young girl growing up in the Dominican Republic during the Trujillo regime. Her entire family is heavily involved with the opposition movement, and many of them have fled to the United States. I love the voice of the main character. She is struggling with the normal issues of a young teenager, while also living under an oppressive regime where much of her family is in very real danger. A good read for adults, both young and old.
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Electrode, App-product, Comp-389269074, DC-prod-cdc04, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-29.0.16-rc-3, SHA-be3b5cd33cf2201002aafe92047174b804e8a87a, CID-
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Electrode, Comp-389269074, DC-prod-cdc04, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-29.0.16-rc-3, SHA-be3b5cd33cf2201002aafe92047174b804e8a87a, CID-b2a99dd7-2b1-16ae5822f08b17, Generated: Thu, 23 May 2019 16:24:35 GMT