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Electrode, Comp-814099623, DC-prod-az-southcentralus-16, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-19.1.31, SHA-771c9ce79737366b1d5f53d21cad4086bf722e21, CID-54fa075e-623-16e760f097f668, Generated: Sat, 16 Nov 2019 21:12:07 GMT

Aesop's Fables - Selected Stories / the Adventures of Poor Mrs. Quack

Walmart # 9781606461471
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Customer Review Snapshot

3.7 out of 5 stars
32 total reviews
5 stars
7
4 stars
12
3 stars
11
2 stars
1
1 star
1
Most helpful positive review
Every few years I enjoy rereading Aesop's Fables. When I come across a different edition with wonderful, new-to-me illustrations, I just can't help myself. The morals of the Fables are occasionally contradictory, that's where they're most interesting in fact. For example, some tales seem to indicate that opposites attract and can help one another; in other instances alike things are attracted to one another and those things that are different are dangerous and can cause them harm; still, one has to fight the urge, because they are so amusing, to agree with all of Aesop's "lessons" on all points. The best thing you can get from it as a child is that the world can be a contradictory place and that the best thing to do is ask questions about the truth of any given assertion or act. Aesop, if he did exist, seems like he could probably move from being a skeptic to being paranoid pretty easily. It's good to read the tales with a dose of good humor.

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Aesop's Fables - Selected Stories / The Adventures Of Poor Mrs. Quack

Specifications

Series Title
Classic Books on Cds Collection
Publisher
Audio Book Contractors
Book Format
Audio CD
Author
Gibson, Flo
ISBN-13
9781606461471
ISBN-10
1606461478

Customer Reviews

5 stars
7
4 stars
12
3 stars
11
2 stars
1
1 star
1
Most helpful positive review
1 customers found this helpful
Every few years I enjo...
Every few years I enjoy rereading Aesop's Fables. When I come across a different edition with wonderful, new-to-me illustrations, I just can't help myself. The morals of the Fables are occasionally contradictory, that's where they're most interesting in fact. For example, some tales seem to indicate that opposites attract and can help one another; in other instances alike things are attracted to one another and those things that are different are dangerous and can cause them harm; still, one has to fight the urge, because they are so amusing, to agree with all of Aesop's "lessons" on all points. The best thing you can get from it as a child is that the world can be a contradictory place and that the best thing to do is ask questions about the truth of any given assertion or act. Aesop, if he did exist, seems like he could probably move from being a skeptic to being paranoid pretty easily. It's good to read the tales with a dose of good humor.
Most helpful negative review
Written, according to ...
Written, according to legend, by the Greek slave Aesop, these one or two page fables offers the readers lessons and morals for a variety of circumstances. The edition that I read did not contain all of Aesop's fables (there are over 350+ stories), but did include many of familiar ones, Androcles and the Lions, the Fox and the grapes, story of the tortoise and the hare, the country mouse and the city mouse etc. For the most part I was disappointed (I think my previous exposure to the Aesop Fables was from the Rocky and Bullwinkle Show and the "Aesop & Son" segments-very funny and much more insightful than the original)-most of the tales appear to be pointless, with some either hypocritical or abhorrent-many of the fables the reader is presented with a character of honorable behavior that is taken advantage of by those who are not. I suppose the moral of any story is life is hard-get used to it! I would not recommended this to any child-even though this book is often marketed that way-only 2 out of 5 stars.
Most helpful positive review
1 customers found this helpful
Every few years I enjo...
Every few years I enjoy rereading Aesop's Fables. When I come across a different edition with wonderful, new-to-me illustrations, I just can't help myself. The morals of the Fables are occasionally contradictory, that's where they're most interesting in fact. For example, some tales seem to indicate that opposites attract and can help one another; in other instances alike things are attracted to one another and those things that are different are dangerous and can cause them harm; still, one has to fight the urge, because they are so amusing, to agree with all of Aesop's "lessons" on all points. The best thing you can get from it as a child is that the world can be a contradictory place and that the best thing to do is ask questions about the truth of any given assertion or act. Aesop, if he did exist, seems like he could probably move from being a skeptic to being paranoid pretty easily. It's good to read the tales with a dose of good humor.
Most helpful negative review
Written, according to ...
Written, according to legend, by the Greek slave Aesop, these one or two page fables offers the readers lessons and morals for a variety of circumstances. The edition that I read did not contain all of Aesop's fables (there are over 350+ stories), but did include many of familiar ones, Androcles and the Lions, the Fox and the grapes, story of the tortoise and the hare, the country mouse and the city mouse etc. For the most part I was disappointed (I think my previous exposure to the Aesop Fables was from the Rocky and Bullwinkle Show and the "Aesop & Son" segments-very funny and much more insightful than the original)-most of the tales appear to be pointless, with some either hypocritical or abhorrent-many of the fables the reader is presented with a character of honorable behavior that is taken advantage of by those who are not. I suppose the moral of any story is life is hard-get used to it! I would not recommended this to any child-even though this book is often marketed that way-only 2 out of 5 stars.
1-5 of 32 reviews

A collection of the gr...

A collection of the greatest stories with a moral attribute ever. Attributed by Aristotle as the best. Transformed into verse by Socrates, these stories captured the imagination of the greatest thinkers in human history, and continue to do so today. No child stands to be harmed by learning these tales, in fact, and argument could be made for the opposite effect. The most highly recommended literature for children by indisputable sources.

I enjoyed this chapter...

I enjoyed this chapter book because of the moral messages learned from each short fable and how I could remember a majority of these stories from my own childhood. The moral lessons learned from these stories stem from always telling the truth, the idea that slow and steady will win the race, and to not judge someone by their appearance. As a child I remembered reading a great majority of these and enjoyed being able to reinterpret what was being said. Although the version I read did not contain illustrations, I did enjoy how the words came to life on the page. As one reads these stories, they can be illustrated in the reader's mind. The big idea of this chapter book is to give a recorded source of the oral stories told so as to teach moral lessons to children and adults.

Classic stories for pe...

Classic stories for people of any age. I have had a copy since I was little and it almost always is displayed on one of my shelves. It is full of small tales you have probably heard over and over, but delightfully do not grow old. There were wonderful illustrations as well.

Every few years I enjo...

Every few years I enjoy rereading Aesop's Fables. When I come across a different edition with wonderful, new-to-me illustrations, I just can't help myself. The morals of the Fables are occasionally contradictory, that's where they're most interesting in fact. For example, some tales seem to indicate that opposites attract and can help one another; in other instances alike things are attracted to one another and those things that are different are dangerous and can cause them harm; still, one has to fight the urge, because they are so amusing, to agree with all of Aesop's "lessons" on all points. The best thing you can get from it as a child is that the world can be a contradictory place and that the best thing to do is ask questions about the truth of any given assertion or act. Aesop, if he did exist, seems like he could probably move from being a skeptic to being paranoid pretty easily. It's good to read the tales with a dose of good humor.

I consider this a re-r...

I consider this a re-read - I can't quite remember when I read this previously, but most of the 100 fables included in this collection were familiar. I always knew that each fable included a moral - it was interesting in reading these that sometimes I didn't think the moral fit all that well.

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Electrode, Comp-812505061, DC-prod-az-southcentralus-18, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-30.0.3, SHA-fe0221a6ef49da0ab2505dfeca6fe7a05293b900, CID-70bfcb6d-23b-16e761133bc740, Generated: Sat, 16 Nov 2019 21:14:29 GMT