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A Wrinkle in Time (Anniversary, Commemorative)

Walmart # 9780374386160

A Wrinkle in Time (Anniversary, Commemorative)

Walmart # 9780374386160
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This is the story of the adventures in space and time of Meg, Charles Wallace, and Calvin O'Keefe (athlete, student, and one of the most popular boys in high school), in search of Meg's missing father.

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This is the story of the adventures in space and time of Meg, Charles Wallace, and Calvin O'Keefe (athlete, student, and one of the most popular boys in high school), in search of Meg's missing father.

Fifty years ago, Madeleine L'Engle introduced the world to A Wrinkle in Time and the wonderful and unforgettable characters Meg and Charles Wallace Murry, and their friend Calvin O'Keefe. When the children learn that Mr. Murry has been captured by the Dark Thing, they time travel to Camazotz, where they must face the leader IT in the ultimate battle between good and evil—a journey that threatens their lives and our universe. A Newbery Award winner, A Wrinkle in Time is an iconic novel that continues to inspire millions of fans around the world. This special edition has been redesigned and includes an introduction by Katherine Paterson, an afterword by Madeleine L'Engle's granddaughter Charlotte Jones Voiklis that includes photographs and memorabilia, the author's Newbery Medal acceptance speech, and other bonus materials.

Specifications

Series Title
A Wrinkle in Time Quintet
Publisher
Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
Book Format
Hardcover
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
280
Author
Madeleine L'Engle
ISBN-13
9780374386160
Publication Date
January, 2012
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
8.56 x 5.67 x 1.11 Inches
ISBN-10
0374386161
Customer Reviews
3.9
347 reviews
5 stars
118
4 stars
129
3 stars
64
2 stars
29
1 star
7
Top Positive Review
8 customers found this helpful
A Wrinkle in Time by Mad
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle; (5*) How does one describe "A Wrinkle in Time"? It is like nothing I have ever read before. The story begins with a family of 6; mother, father; both scientists and the father has been away for several years on governmental business, Meg, twins Sandy and Dennys, and 5 year old Charles Wallace whom people find very strange, but his family knows he is not strange but special. The father has not been heard from for several years. Charles Wallace does not even remember him. Late one stormy night Charles Wallace, Meg, and their mother are having hot chocolate when through the door blows Mrs. Whatsit. She is rather a special lady and she and her two companion ladies, Mrs. Who and Mrs Which, are able to change form when they need to and time travel. They fight evil with good. Charles Wallace is at once comfortable and at home in their presence. Mrs. Whatsit has come to get him, Meg and their friend Calvin to help them rescue the father who is actually fighting the darkness of evil off on another planet. How do they get there? Why they travel by "A Wrinkle in Time", of course. By the end of the book goodness and love have overcome evil and hatred and the family is reunited but not until many obstacles have been overcome. There are numerous religious overtones within the story and ethereal creatures as well; some good, some evil. Also there is clearly the moral issue that love can win the day. But the book is not as simplistic as I have painted it to be. There are many underlying themes. The "appendix" to this book is written by Lisa Sonne who is a scientist herself and in it she states that parts of the book are NOT the wild imagination of a creative writer. She goes on to devote 21 pages to describing the possibilities of further life "out there" and scientific explanations for parts of the book. It is very interesting in and of itself. I cannot imagine that there is a person out there who would not be charmed by this tale. I know I was. I just wanted to reach within the pages of the book and hug Meg and pinch little Charles Wallace's cheeks. I highly recommend this to everyone.
Top Negative Review
I was more confused when
I was more confused when I finished this book than when I started. An enormous threat to the universe is posed in the first few chapters, but once the main characters are all safely home, who cares that the dark blob is still out there enslaving minds? As a Christian, I was also quite disturbed to find that this book explicitly lumps my Savior in with the likes of ordinary mortals like Da Vinci, Copernicus, Gandhi, etc. It was imaginative enough. The complete lack of substance and/or resolution, however, destroyed any interest in ever recommending it or rereading it.
Top Positive Review
8 customers found this helpful
A Wrinkle in Time by Mad
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle; (5*) How does one describe "A Wrinkle in Time"? It is like nothing I have ever read before. The story begins with a family of 6; mother, father; both scientists and the father has been away for several years on governmental business, Meg, twins Sandy and Dennys, and 5 year old Charles Wallace whom people find very strange, but his family knows he is not strange but special. The father has not been heard from for several years. Charles Wallace does not even remember him. Late one stormy night Charles Wallace, Meg, and their mother are having hot chocolate when through the door blows Mrs. Whatsit. She is rather a special lady and she and her two companion ladies, Mrs. Who and Mrs Which, are able to change form when they need to and time travel. They fight evil with good. Charles Wallace is at once comfortable and at home in their presence. Mrs. Whatsit has come to get him, Meg and their friend Calvin to help them rescue the father who is actually fighting the darkness of evil off on another planet. How do they get there? Why they travel by "A Wrinkle in Time", of course. By the end of the book goodness and love have overcome evil and hatred and the family is reunited but not until many obstacles have been overcome. There are numerous religious overtones within the story and ethereal creatures as well; some good, some evil. Also there is clearly the moral issue that love can win the day. But the book is not as simplistic as I have painted it to be. There are many underlying themes. The "appendix" to this book is written by Lisa Sonne who is a scientist herself and in it she states that parts of the book are NOT the wild imagination of a creative writer. She goes on to devote 21 pages to describing the possibilities of further life "out there" and scientific explanations for parts of the book. It is very interesting in and of itself. I cannot imagine that there is a person out there who would not be charmed by this tale. I know I was. I just wanted to reach within the pages of the book and hug Meg and pinch little Charles Wallace's cheeks. I highly recommend this to everyone.
Top Negative Review
I was more confused when
I was more confused when I finished this book than when I started. An enormous threat to the universe is posed in the first few chapters, but once the main characters are all safely home, who cares that the dark blob is still out there enslaving minds? As a Christian, I was also quite disturbed to find that this book explicitly lumps my Savior in with the likes of ordinary mortals like Da Vinci, Copernicus, Gandhi, etc. It was imaginative enough. The complete lack of substance and/or resolution, however, destroyed any interest in ever recommending it or rereading it.
1-5 of 347 reviews

A Wrinkle in Time by Mad

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle; (5*) How does one describe "A Wrinkle in Time"? It is like nothing I have ever read before. The story begins with a family of 6; mother, father; both scientists and the father has been away for several years on governmental business, Meg, twins Sandy and Dennys, and 5 year old Charles Wallace whom people find very strange, but his family knows he is not strange but special. The father has not been heard from for several years. Charles Wallace does not even remember him. Late one stormy night Charles Wallace, Meg, and their mother are having hot chocolate when through the door blows Mrs. Whatsit. She is rather a special lady and she and her two companion ladies, Mrs. Who and Mrs Which, are able to change form when they need to and time travel. They fight evil with good. Charles Wallace is at once comfortable and at home in their presence. Mrs. Whatsit has come to get him, Meg and their friend Calvin to help them rescue the father who is actually fighting the darkness of evil off on another planet. How do they get there? Why they travel by "A Wrinkle in Time", of course. By the end of the book goodness and love have overcome evil and hatred and the family is reunited but not until many obstacles have been overcome. There are numerous religious overtones within the story and ethereal creatures as well; some good, some evil. Also there is clearly the moral issue that love can win the day. But the book is not as simplistic as I have painted it to be. There are many underlying themes. The "appendix" to this book is written by Lisa Sonne who is a scientist herself and in it she states that parts of the book are NOT the wild imagination of a creative writer. She goes on to devote 21 pages to describing the possibilities of further life "out there" and scientific explanations for parts of the book. It is very interesting in and of itself. I cannot imagine that there is a person out there who would not be charmed by this tale. I know I was. I just wanted to reach within the pages of the book and hug Meg and pinch little Charles Wallace's cheeks. I highly recommend this to everyone.

Rating: 4* of five The

Rating: 4* of five The Book Report: Meg Murry's daddy left home unexpectedly and without saying goodbye. The adored parent left behind an adolescent daughter, three sons, and a beautiful and smart wife. Meg cannot make herself get used to his absence and can't even pretend that she's not hurt by the town's opinion that he ran off leaving her mother. This, plus braces, wildly curly hair, an intelligence far greater than her contemporaries', and glasses, isolate the girl with her even weirder little brother Charles Wallace against their normal brothers and the rest of the world. In time-honored tradition, these misfits are actually being prepared to fight the ultimate battle of Good Versus Evil, no pressure on the children no no no, and save their Daddy, not like it's gettin' piled even higher oh no! One fine day, Meg and Charles Wallace are called to their destiny by Mrs Which, Mrs Who, and Mrs Whatsit, the eccentric old ladies who prove to be avatars of interdimensional good beings with the agenda of making the Universe safe for goodness and happiness again. The children are joined by fellow misfit Calvin, a popular boy athlete in their town whose hidden depths have tormented him all his life, in the quest to make the evil entity, a disembodied brain called "IT," that slowly takes over planets and compels all life thereon to submit to being in a group mind, erasing individuality and leaching away happiness. This is a YA novel, so all turns out well, with Mr. Murry coming home and the children being brought home all safe and sound. My Review: But how they get home is very interesting: They travel via tesseract, a geometric figure that extends into a fifth dimension beyond spacetime. Mr. and Mrs. Murry have been researching this in their roles as scientists, and Mr. Murry has used the tesseract to get to the planet from which he's rescued. The Mrs Who/Which/Whatsit interdimensional beings use the tesseract to "tesser" or wrinkle the fabric of spacetime to get the children there as well. Fascinating stuff for a Christian housewife to be writing about in 1960-1961! And make no mistake, the book is a very Christianity-infested Message about the perils of brains without hearts leading to Communistic group-think. Mrs. Murry, a capable scientist, stays home with the kiddos and makes dinner over Bunsen burners so she can keep working while she stays home to be a wife and mom. Ew. And Meg, poor lamb, worries that she's not pretty enough because she needs braces and glasses and she's not all gorgeous like her mom is. Then Calvin, a popular boy and an athlete, shows hidden depths and falls for little Meg. So bells ring, doves coo, and hands are held, so all is well. Ew. But it ain't Twilight, so I'm good with it. In fact, because I first read it before I was ten, I'm good with all of it. The stiff, unrealistic dialogue, the socially regressive and reprehensible messages, the religiosity...all get a benign half-smile and an indulgent wink. Because sometimes you just need to know that someone out there believes that good CAN triumph over evil.

This is another fantasy n

This is another fantasy novel for older children published in the early 1960s, though unlike the Alan Garner novel I read just before this, this one contains much more of a mixture of fantasy and science fiction ideas. Meg and her brother Charles Wallace and another boy Calvin meet three mysterious "witches" who go by the delightful names of Mrs Whatsit, Mrs Who and Mrs Which. In search of Meg and Charles's father, who disappeared a year ago while supposedly carrying out top secret government work, the children are then whisked off through the eponymous medium to another planet threatened by a mysterious dark force which also threatens the Earth. However, most of the action takes place on the planet Camazotz, ruled over by a disembodied brain which enforces total uniformity on its inhabitants in the name of guaranteeing order and happiness, which is quite a stark idea, opening up readers' minds to concepts of personal freedom and the potential price that can be paid for order and happiness (or at least, as here, an absence of unhappiness or pain, which is not the same thing at all). The children's characters are quite clearly delineated and more three dimensional than many child central characters in young people's literature. The ending was rather abrupt, though I understand the author went to write a quintet of these novels.

Meg, Charles Wallace, and

Meg, Charles Wallace, and Calvin set off an quite an adventure to find Meg's father and bring him home. With the help of three mythical creatures and Aunt Beast, they strive on to accomplish their quest. The author does a masterful job of writing fantasy that includes the overtones of religious writings and yet enters the realm of fantasy wholeheartedly. Elements of suspense and mystery will engage readers of all ages in this timeless classic.

I somehow never encounter

I somehow never encountered this book when I was young, but I'm certain that I would have enjoyed it, particularly with the strong female characters. The only thing that turned me off a bit were a couple of overtly religious passages. Those seemed out of place with the tone of the rest of the book or they probably wouldn't have bothered me. I may just be overly sensitive because I have gotten really, really tired of having other's beliefs crammed down my throat. Other than that, it was a lovely book and a very good read.
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Electrode, App-product, Comp-389264314, DC-prod-cdc01, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-29.0.16-rc-4, SHA-e3fc4b712ae1bb3abbc3da414314a20f8a9810e6, CID-
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Electrode, Comp-389264314, DC-prod-cdc01, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-29.0.16-rc-4, SHA-e3fc4b712ae1bb3abbc3da414314a20f8a9810e6, CID-b56ccf33-ea9-16af114bdd1e03, Generated: Sat, 25 May 2019 22:20:29 GMT