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Electrode, Comp-701261214, DC-prod-cdc02, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-19.1.31, SHA-771c9ce79737366b1d5f53d21cad4086bf722e21, CID-a02a9d00-1e8-16e78b103c0c15, Generated: Sun, 17 Nov 2019 09:28:17 GMT

A Journal of the Plague Year

Walmart # 9780199555727
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Customer Review Snapshot

3.5 out of 5 stars
20 total reviews
5 stars
1
4 stars
10
3 stars
7
2 stars
2
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
Understated as it is, this fictional 'documentary' of the Plague Year is gripping. Compelling and eminently readable, it gives an almost businesslike account of the Plague's imagined horror. As birchmore pointed out, there are fascinating authorial techniques at work. Early in the story, the saddler establishes his claim as a truthful source not only by his sober and skeptical tone, but by his constant reference to the actual Bills of Mortality. Then, as the story progresses, the narrator, firmly established in the reader's confidence, begins to cast doubt on their legitimacy and accuracy - realistically heightening the fears of catastrophe. Even as a modern reader, it's difficult not to succumb to the Journal's appearance of truth. As far as I'm concerned, that's an extraordinary testimony to Defoe's brilliance.

About This Item

We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it.
The text and notes are reproduced from the Oxford English Novels edition. The introduction sheds light on the relationship of the Journal to Pepys's diary, and a medical note relates the latest research on the Plague.

Specifications

Series Title
Oxford World's Classics (Paperback)
Publisher
Oxford University Press, USA
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
336
Author
Daniel Defoe
ISBN-13
9780199555727
Publication Date
July, 2009
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
7.60 x 5.00 x 0.70 Inches
ISBN-10
0199555729

Customer Reviews

5 stars
1
4 stars
10
3 stars
7
2 stars
2
1 star
0
Most helpful positive review
3 customers found this helpful
Understated as it is, ...
Understated as it is, this fictional 'documentary' of the Plague Year is gripping. Compelling and eminently readable, it gives an almost businesslike account of the Plague's imagined horror. As birchmore pointed out, there are fascinating authorial techniques at work. Early in the story, the saddler establishes his claim as a truthful source not only by his sober and skeptical tone, but by his constant reference to the actual Bills of Mortality. Then, as the story progresses, the narrator, firmly established in the reader's confidence, begins to cast doubt on their legitimacy and accuracy - realistically heightening the fears of catastrophe. Even as a modern reader, it's difficult not to succumb to the Journal's appearance of truth. As far as I'm concerned, that's an extraordinary testimony to Defoe's brilliance.
Most helpful negative review
Yep... Defoes returns...
Yep... Defoe's returns continue to diminish. This reminds me of Dostoevsky's 'House of the Dead,' since both books are absolutely riveting for the first 100 pages or so: you get an immediate impression of what it's like to live in a plague-ridden London (or Russian prison); you get drawn in by the odd 'life is stranger than fiction' moment, but then, before you know it, you're reading exactly the same thing two or even three times for no particular reason other than the narrator's inability to revise his own work. If you know much about the way plague was treated by the early moderns, you won't be surprised by too much here. This penguin edition has some things going for it, starting with an amazing cover illustration and ending with Anthony Burgess' old introduction which is now an appendix. I suspect that's there because Burgess does what an introducer ought to do: describes a bit about Defoe's life and times, a bit about the book you're about to read, and a very slight interpretation of that book (here: 'can we preserve the societies we build?') The editor of this volume, on the other hand, gives us a semi-rapturous 'analysis' of Defoe's use of 'place' in the book, which sounds interesting until you read the book and realize that it's utterly tendentious. Literary fashion is an odd beast- wouldn't it have made more sense to redo Roxana than to redo this?
Most helpful positive review
3 customers found this helpful
Understated as it is, ...
Understated as it is, this fictional 'documentary' of the Plague Year is gripping. Compelling and eminently readable, it gives an almost businesslike account of the Plague's imagined horror. As birchmore pointed out, there are fascinating authorial techniques at work. Early in the story, the saddler establishes his claim as a truthful source not only by his sober and skeptical tone, but by his constant reference to the actual Bills of Mortality. Then, as the story progresses, the narrator, firmly established in the reader's confidence, begins to cast doubt on their legitimacy and accuracy - realistically heightening the fears of catastrophe. Even as a modern reader, it's difficult not to succumb to the Journal's appearance of truth. As far as I'm concerned, that's an extraordinary testimony to Defoe's brilliance.
Most helpful negative review
Yep... Defoes returns...
Yep... Defoe's returns continue to diminish. This reminds me of Dostoevsky's 'House of the Dead,' since both books are absolutely riveting for the first 100 pages or so: you get an immediate impression of what it's like to live in a plague-ridden London (or Russian prison); you get drawn in by the odd 'life is stranger than fiction' moment, but then, before you know it, you're reading exactly the same thing two or even three times for no particular reason other than the narrator's inability to revise his own work. If you know much about the way plague was treated by the early moderns, you won't be surprised by too much here. This penguin edition has some things going for it, starting with an amazing cover illustration and ending with Anthony Burgess' old introduction which is now an appendix. I suspect that's there because Burgess does what an introducer ought to do: describes a bit about Defoe's life and times, a bit about the book you're about to read, and a very slight interpretation of that book (here: 'can we preserve the societies we build?') The editor of this volume, on the other hand, gives us a semi-rapturous 'analysis' of Defoe's use of 'place' in the book, which sounds interesting until you read the book and realize that it's utterly tendentious. Literary fashion is an odd beast- wouldn't it have made more sense to redo Roxana than to redo this?
1-5 of 20 reviews

This was assigned in a...

This was assigned in an undergrad Stuart history class. I was incensed that we were having to read a NOVEL! Well, I was stupid, indeed. This is a fine, revealing look at the horrors that people experienced in 1666.

Understated as it is, ...

Understated as it is, this fictional 'documentary' of the Plague Year is gripping. Compelling and eminently readable, it gives an almost businesslike account of the Plague's imagined horror. As birchmore pointed out, there are fascinating authorial techniques at work. Early in the story, the saddler establishes his claim as a truthful source not only by his sober and skeptical tone, but by his constant reference to the actual Bills of Mortality. Then, as the story progresses, the narrator, firmly established in the reader's confidence, begins to cast doubt on their legitimacy and accuracy - realistically heightening the fears of catastrophe. Even as a modern reader, it's difficult not to succumb to the Journal's appearance of truth. As far as I'm concerned, that's an extraordinary testimony to Defoe's brilliance.

With Ebola outbreaks o...

With Ebola outbreaks on the news and debates on vaccinations on every blog, it seemed like a perfect time to return to one of the original records of a disease outbreak. I was particularly curious to read this book because it was mentioned multiple times in "On Immunity". The author of Robinson Crusoe wrote this fictionalized account of a man who lives through the bubonic plague in England in 1665. Defoe was only 5-years-old at that time, but his account is considered one of the most accurate ones of the plague. Defoe looks at the plague through the eyes of one man. He's forced to decide if he should stay or go when the outbreak begins. So many people fled, but some didn't realize they had already been infected. They carried the plague with them to other towns. Some people who were sick would throw themselves into the pits of the dead and wait their death out. The book is surprisingly interesting for a nonfiction account written centuries ago. Defoe talked about the actually details of how the outbreak was handle. For example, when one person in a family got sick, the rest of the family was kept in their house with a guard posted out front or other times they were all sent to the sick house, where they often became infected even if they weren't sick before. Random Tidbits: The scene from "Monty Python and the Search for the Holy Grail" where they are yelling out "Bring out your dead!" was a real thing. People went around with carts and actually yelled that out to collect the dead bodies. The standard of burying people six feet under was also established at this point. It used to be a very arbitrary depth before the plague. BOTTOM LINE: It's less about the plague itself than it is about the study of a society in duress. It was fascinating to see the different ways people reacted. Their fight or flight tendencies haven't changed much over the last 300 years.

I would rate this book...

I would rate this book 4 stars but for the errors in the edition I was reading (Barnes & Noble Library Of Essential Reading). Regardless of whether this book is fiction, history or a blend between the two, it is a very interesting account of the Great Plague of London, and if the subject interests you, I would recommend reading it.

I would rate this book...

I would rate this book 4 stars but for the errors in the edition I was reading (Barnes & Noble Library Of Essential Reading). Regardless of whether this book is fiction, history or a blend between the two, it is a very interesting account of the Great Plague of London, and if the subject interests you, I would recommend reading it.

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Electrode, Comp-389264341, DC-prod-cdc01, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-30.0.3, SHA-fe0221a6ef49da0ab2505dfeca6fe7a05293b900, CID-20995c98-ee3-16e78ba4a56998, Generated: Sun, 17 Nov 2019 09:38:26 GMT