George Orwell

1984 George Orwell - Large Print Edition

Average Rating:out of 5 stars
Write a review
Walmart # 573068794
$30.60$30.60
Free delivery on $35+ orders

Arrives by Thu, Aug 20

Free pickup Wed, Aug 19

Ships to San Leandro, 1919 Davis St

Sold & shipped byWalmart
1984 is a dystopian novel that predicts the future, a society dominated by "Fake News" where there is no way for the people to know what is true and what is not. It has been named as one of the best English language novels of the past century.

About This Item

We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it.
1984 is a dystopian novel that predicts the future, a society dominated by "Fake News" where there is no way for the people to know what is true and what is not. It has been named as one of the best English language novels of the past century.

Because of the election of the new president, the book 1984 by George Orwell has sold out at the bookstores.
This has led to reprinting 1984 in a large print edition with 18 point type to make it easier for us old people to read.
The connection between the new president and the book 1984 is not obvious unless one has read the last part of the book.
In 1984, the protagonist Winston Smith works for the "Ministry of Love". His job is to insure that the general population love the government and its leader Big Brother.
To insure that the people love Big Brother, Winston rewrites all the newspaper articles so that they correctly reflect the views of the current government.
After having re-written an old newspaper article, he replaces it with the new article and then flushes the original article down the "memory hole".
He does this so thoroughly that in the future nobody will be able to find out what the real past was.
The connection with new president should now be obvious. He talks constantly on TV today about "Fake News" and "Alternate Facts".
Many people obviously believe his version of the news because that is how he got elected. How this will turn out is the subject of this book.

Specifications

Publisher
Ishi Press
Book Format
Paperback
Original Languages
English
Number of Pages
418
Author
George Orwell
Is Large Print
Y
Title
1984 George Orwell - Large Print Edition
ISBN-13
9784871872683
Publication Date
February, 2017
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H)
10.00 x 7.99 x 0.85 Inches
ISBN-10
4871872688

Customer Reviews

Average Rating:(4.2)out of 5 stars
5 stars
235
4 stars
133
3 stars
65
2 stars
17
1 star
9
Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
At first I thought thi...
At first I thought this book was satirical, I couldn't take seriously the ministry of plenty, the ministry of truth, etc. How could a society be fooled by a government who so obviously touts the lies by which it functions? Ah shoot, it got me. Doublethink, the process by which people speak around the actual truth, using language to present what the government wants them to believe, is what explained it to me. And the author adds that in order for doublethink to work properly, the thinker has to be conscious of the very lie they are believing. This book messed with my head in a way that will never be undone. I hate it. Thank you Mr. Orwell.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(1.0)out of 5 stars
Boring and impossible ...
Boring and impossible to like. A book for the kind of dreadful people who like to imagine that, of all the abuses and brutality a fascist state is capable of inflicting upon its population, they'd find distortion and control of the truth the worst - the street beatings, massive corruption and state approved murders would probably concern me more than the prospect of "being rehabilitated" and betraying the truth. Even ignoring this, 1984 is a dull novel that is so cluttered with ropey symbolism that it makes Animal Farm look subtle: The snow globe, the nookie in the woods, the rambling on about the measurement of beer and gin, all combine to form a picture of Orwell forever mashing his overly laboured point into a human face. The theme of human betrayal and Big Brother's corruptive influence on society that underpins much of the novel is just as awkward and clumsy as the devices through which it acts: where some art may be said to mimic life, 1984 is a mere caricature of the horrors of totalitarianism. Even so, at least it isn't Keep the Aspidistra Flying.
Most helpful positive review
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars
At first I thought thi...
At first I thought this book was satirical, I couldn't take seriously the ministry of plenty, the ministry of truth, etc. How could a society be fooled by a government who so obviously touts the lies by which it functions? Ah shoot, it got me. Doublethink, the process by which people speak around the actual truth, using language to present what the government wants them to believe, is what explained it to me. And the author adds that in order for doublethink to work properly, the thinker has to be conscious of the very lie they are believing. This book messed with my head in a way that will never be undone. I hate it. Thank you Mr. Orwell.
Most helpful negative review
Average Rating:(1.0)out of 5 stars
Boring and impossible ...
Boring and impossible to like. A book for the kind of dreadful people who like to imagine that, of all the abuses and brutality a fascist state is capable of inflicting upon its population, they'd find distortion and control of the truth the worst - the street beatings, massive corruption and state approved murders would probably concern me more than the prospect of "being rehabilitated" and betraying the truth. Even ignoring this, 1984 is a dull novel that is so cluttered with ropey symbolism that it makes Animal Farm look subtle: The snow globe, the nookie in the woods, the rambling on about the measurement of beer and gin, all combine to form a picture of Orwell forever mashing his overly laboured point into a human face. The theme of human betrayal and Big Brother's corruptive influence on society that underpins much of the novel is just as awkward and clumsy as the devices through which it acts: where some art may be said to mimic life, 1984 is a mere caricature of the horrors of totalitarianism. Even so, at least it isn't Keep the Aspidistra Flying.
At first I thought this book was satirical, I couldn't take seriously the ministry of plenty, the ministry of truth, etc. How could a society be fooled by a government who so obviously touts the lies by which it functions? Ah shoot, it got me. Doublethink, the process by which people speak around the actual truth, using language to present what the government wants them to believe, is what explained it to me. And the author adds that in order for doublethink to work properly, the thinker has to be conscious of the very lie they are believing. This book messed with my head in a way that will never be undone. I hate it. Thank you Mr. Orwell.
Boring and impossible to like. A book for the kind of dreadful people who like to imagine that, of all the abuses and brutality a fascist state is capable of inflicting upon its population, they'd find distortion and control of the truth the worst - the street beatings, massive corruption and state approved murders would probably concern me more than the prospect of "being rehabilitated" and betraying the truth. Even ignoring this, 1984 is a dull novel that is so cluttered with ropey symbolism that it makes Animal Farm look subtle: The snow globe, the nookie in the woods, the rambling on about the measurement of beer and gin, all combine to form a picture of Orwell forever mashing his overly laboured point into a human face. The theme of human betrayal and Big Brother's corruptive influence on society that underpins much of the novel is just as awkward and clumsy as the devices through which it acts: where some art may be said to mimic life, 1984 is a mere caricature of the horrors of totalitarianism. Even so, at least it isn't Keep the Aspidistra Flying.

Frequent mentions

1-5 of 459 reviews
Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

At first I thought thi...

At first I thought this book was satirical, I couldn't take seriously the ministry of plenty, the ministry of truth, etc. How could a society be fooled by a government who so obviously touts the lies by which it functions? Ah shoot, it got me. Doublethink, the process by which people speak around the actual truth, using language to present what the government wants them to believe, is what explained it to me. And the author adds that in order for doublethink to work properly, the thinker has to be conscious of the very lie they are believing. This book messed with my head in a way that will never be undone. I hate it. Thank you Mr. Orwell.

Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

This is among my favor...

This is among my favorite books! I can't recommend this book highly enough. It's a classic dystopia novel. I do think that too often people show this book as a reflection of our current society and display Orwell as almost prophetic. A little ridiculous but I think after reading this book I started looking at things that are mostly considered harmless propaganda differently. Looking at what is really harmless and what can cause real harm. Winston Smith I think is a realistic admirable charter, which I think is sometimes hard to find. I think in many books writers work so hard on making the protagonist admirable they often forget to make him/her human. Just a point in the book I liked very much and wanted to point out specifically.

Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

I really enjoyed this ...

I really enjoyed this book. I'm happy that after years of knowing about this novel I finally got a chance to read it. This book would be a great tool for combining history/social studies with literature and opening up discussion about how the novel may reflect what is happening in today's world.

Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

This book, every time ...

This book, every time I read it, only gets better.I am captivated by Winston's choices (some of which are terrible and stupid). But I am, everytime, crushed by the end. Reading about Big Brother, censorship, undying loyalty to the Party sadly reminds me too much of our own society. Specifically, I think to post-9/11, when the government was able to lock up citizens and non citizens for as long as they wanted, without the right to a lawyer or judge, just locked up. I think of US citizens who were encouraged to report "suspicious" behavior and actions of their neighbors. I think of citizens and celebrities who, if they dared speak against the war, were astrocized and labeled unpatriotic. Reading this book makes me sad for our society. It makes me wish we were better than we are. SPOILER:Every time I read this, I am absolutely devastated that he is captured, that he is tortured and gives everything and everyone up. I am haunted by the last words in the book, "I love Big Brother".This is one of the first dystopia books I ever read, and unlike some, it ends with such a lack of hope that the reader is left feeling that the current situations of the people will never be altered. This sense of hopelessness is one that leaves the reader chilled--which is what I think was the desired purposed.

Average Rating:(5.0)out of 5 stars

Novel by George Orwell...

Novel by George Orwell, published in 1949 as a warning about the menaces of totalitarianism. The novel is set in an imaginary future world that is dominated by three perpetually warring totalitarian police states. The book's hero, Winston Smith, is a minor party functionary in one of these states. His longing for truth and decency leads him to secretly rebel against the government. Smith has a love affair with a like-minded woman, but they are both arrested by the Thought Police. The ensuing imprisonment, torture, and reeducation of Smith are intended not merely to break him physically or make him submit but to root out his independent mental existence and his spiritual dignity. Orwell's warning of the dangers of totalitarianism made a deep impression on his contemporaries and upon subsequent readers, and the book's title and many of its coinages, such as NEWSPEAK, became bywords for modern political abuses. -- The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature


Customer Q&A

Get specific details about this product from customers who own it.

Ask a question

If you would like to share feedback with us about pricing, delivery or other customer service issues, please contact customer service directly.

Policies & Plans

Pricing policy

About our prices
We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything. So if you find a current lower price from an online retailer on an identical, in-stock product, tell us and we'll match it. See more details atOnline Price Match.

webapp branch
Electrode, Comp-dc1e7b27-778c-43b2-b307-17dffadad7ad, DC-eus2-prod-a3, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-36.5.0, SHA-1e7e562741c42b3e4340c969ae68540802a9ebd4, CID-b5544c3e-007-173e577a5342a5, Generated: Thu, 13 Aug 2020 01:38:10 GMT