Beat Cop to Top Cop: A Tale of Three Cities

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Beat Cop to Top Cop: A Tale of Three Cities

Format:  Hardcover,

336 pages

Publisher: Univ of Pennsylvania Pr

Publish Date: May 2010

ISBN-13: 9780812242461

ISBN-10: 0812242467

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The following content was provided by the publisher.

Born in a rough-and-tumble neighborhood of Dublin, John F. Timoney moved to New York with his family in 1961. Not long after graduating from high school in the Bronx, he entered the New York City Police Department, quickly rising through the ranks to become the youngest four-star chief in the history of that department. Timoney and the rest of the command assembled under Police Commissioner Bill Bratton implemented a number of radical strategies, protocols, and management systems, including CompStat, that led to historic declines in nearly every category of crime. In 1998, Mayor Ed Rendell of Philadelphia hired Timoney as police commissioner to tackle the city's seemingly intractable violent crime rate. Philadelphia became the great laboratory experiment: Could the systems and policies employed in New York work elsewhere? Under Timoney's leadership, crime declined in every major category, especially homicide. A similar decrease not only in crime but also in corruption marked Timoney's tenure in his next position as police chief of Miami, a post he held from 2003 to January 2010."Beat Cop to Top Cop: A Tale of Three Cities" documents Timoney's rise, from his days as a tough street cop in the South Bronx to his role as police chief of Miami. This fast-moving narrative by the man "Esquire" magazine named "America's Top Cop" offers a blueprint for crime prevention through first-person accounts from the street, detailing how big-city chiefs and their teams can tame even the most unruly cities.Policy makers and academicians have long embraced the view that the police could do little to affect crime in the long term. John Timoney has devoted his career to dispelling this notion. "Beat Cop to Top Cop" tells us how.

Specifications

Author:
Foreword by:
Publisher: Univ of Pennsylvania Pr
Publish Date: May 2010
ISBN-13: 9780812242461
ISBN-10: 0812242467
Format: Hardcover
Number of Pages: 336
Shipping Weight (in pounds): 1.45
Product in Inches (L x W x H): 6.3 x 1.3 x 9.1

About the author

Biography of Wolfe, Tom

Tom Wolfe was born March 2, 1931 in Richmond, Virginia. He received his Bachelor's from Washington and Lee in 1951 and his Ph.D in American Studies from Yale in 1957. In December 1956, he took a job as a reporter on the Springfield Union. For six months in 1960 he served as The Washington Post's Latin American correspondent and won the Washington Newspaper Guild's foreign news prize for his coverage of Cuba.

In 1962 he became a reporter for the New York Herald Tribune and, in addition, one of the two staff writers of New York magazine, which began as the Herald Tribune's Sunday supplement. While still a daily reporter for the Herald Tribune, he completed his first book, a collection of articles about the flamboyant Sixties written for New York and Esquire and published in 1965 as The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby.

The book became a bestseller and established Wolfe as a leading figure in the literary experiments in nonfiction that became known as the New Journalism. In November 1965, there was a one-man exhibition of his sketches, followed by another in 1974. In 1968 he published two bestsellers on the same day: The Pump House Gang, made up of more articles about life in the Sixties, and The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, a nonfiction story of the hippie era.

In 1970 he published Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers, a highly controversial book about racial friction in the United States. Even more controversial was Wolfe's 1975 book on the American art world, The Painted Word. In 1976 he published another collection, Mauve Gloves & Madmen, Clutter & Vine, which included his well-known essay "The Me Decade and the Third Great Awakening". In 1979 Wolfe completed a book he had worked on for more than six years, an account of the rocket airplane experiments of the post-World War II era and the early space program.

The Right Stuff became a bestseller and won the American Book Award for nonfiction, the National Institute of Arts and Letters Harold Vursell Award for prose style, and the Columbia Journalism Award. Wolfe had been illustrating his own work in newspapers and magazines since the 1950's, and in 1977, he began doing a monthly illustrated feature for Harper's magazine called "In Our Time". The book, In Our Time, published in 1980, featured these drawings and many others.

In 1981 he wrote a companion to The Painted Word entitled From Bauhaus to Our House, about the world of American architecture. In 1984 and 1985 Wolfe wrote his first novel, The Bonfire of the Vanities, in serial form against a deadline of every two weeks for Rolling Stone magazine. It came out in book form in 1987. A story of the money-feverish 1980s in New York, The Bonfire of the Vanities was number one of the New York Times bestseller list for two months and remained on the list for more than a year, selling over 800,000 copies in hardcover.

It also became the number-one bestselling paperback, with sales above two million, and was recognized as the essential novel of America in the 1980's. In 1989 Wolfe outraged the literacy community with an essay in Harper's magazine called "Stalking the Billion-footed Beast". In 1996, Wolfe wrote the novella "Ambush at Fort Bragg" as a two-part series for Rolling Stone. In 1997 it was published as a book in France and Spain and as an audiotape in the United States.

The novel, A Man in Full, was published in November of 1998, and headed the New York Times bestseller list for ten weeks and selling nearly 1.4 million copies in hardcover. The book's tremendous commercial success, its enthusiastic welcome by reviewers, and Wolfe's appearance on the cover of Time magazine, along with his claim that his sort of detailed realism was the future of the American novel, if it was going to have one, provoked a furious reaction among other American novelists, notably John Updike, Norman Mailer, and John Irving. Wolfe has also coined several phrases, including "The Me Decade", "Master of the Universe", "Radical Chic", and "The Right Stuff".

Chapter outline

Foreword
Introduction: Be Careful What You Wish For
New York City
Getting the Job
The South Bronx
From Sergeant to Management
Captain Timoney
Chinatown
Back to Headquarters Under Dinkins
The Bratton Era Begins
CompStat, Crowd Control, and the "Dirty Thirty
The Beginning of the End
Interregnum
Philadelphia
Philadelphia, Here I Come
Pugnacious Philly
Miami
Paradise Found: Miami
Free Trade, Free Speech, and the Politics of Policing
Conclusion: Where We Were, Where We Are
Index

Book description

Born in a rough-and-tumble neighborhood of Dublin, John F. Timoney moved to New York with his family in 1961. Not long after graduating from high school in the Bronx, he entered the New York City Police Department, quickly rising through the ranks to become the youngest four-star chief in the history of that department. Timoney and the rest of the command assembled under Police Commissioner Bill Bratton implemented a number of radical strategies, protocols, and management systems, including CompStat, that led to historic declines in nearly every category of crime. In 1998, Mayor Ed Rendell of Philadelphia hired Timoney as police commissioner to tackle the city's seemingly intractable violent crime rate. Philadelphia became the great laboratory experiment: Could the systems and policies employed in New York work elsewhere? Under Timoney's leadership, crime declined in every major category, especially homicide. A similar decrease not only in crime but also in corruption marked Timoney's tenure in his next position as police chief of Miami, a post he held from 2003 to January 2010.

Beat Cop to Top Cop: A Tale of Three Cities documents Timoney's rise, from his days as a tough street cop in the South Bronx to his role as police chief of Miami. This fast-moving narrative by the man Esquire magazine named "America's Top Cop" offers a blueprint for crime prevention through first-person accounts from the street, detailing how big-city chiefs and their teams can tame even the most unruly cities.

Policy makers and academicians have long embraced the view that the police could do little to affect crime in the long term. John Timoney has devoted his career to dispelling this notion. Beat Cop to Top Cop tells us how.

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