Age Of Innocence

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Age Of Innocence

Format:  Paperback,

336 pages

Publisher: Sterling Pub Co Inc

Publish Date: Aug 2004

ISBN-13: 9781593081430

ISBN-10: 159308143X

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The following content was provided by the publisher.
"Age of Innocence," by Edith Wharton, is part of the "Barnes & Noble Classics"" "series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of "Barnes & Noble Classics"
  • All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. "Barnes & Noble Classics "pulls together a constellation of influences--biographical, historical, and literary--to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works. Winner of the 1921 Pulitzer Prize, "The Age of Innocence" is Edith Wharton's masterful portrait of desire and betrayal during the sumptuous Golden Age of Old New York, a time when society people "dreaded scandal more than disease."
    This is Newland Archer's world as he prepares to marry the beautiful but conventional May Welland. But when the mysterious Countess Ellen Olenska returns to New York after a disastrous marriage, Archer falls deeply in love with her. Torn between duty and passion, Archer struggles to make a decision that will either courageously define his life--or mercilessly destroy it.
    Maureen Howard is a critic, teacher, and writer of fiction. Her seven novels include "Bridgeport Bus," "Natural History," and "A Lover's Almanac." Her memoir, "Facts of Life," won the National Book Critics' Circle Award. She has taught at Yale and Columbia University.
  • Specifications

    :
    Publisher: Sterling Pub Co Inc
    Publish Date: Aug 2004
    ISBN-13: 9781593081430
    ISBN-10: 159308143X
    Format: Paperback
    Number of Pages: 336
    Shipping Weight (in pounds): 0.65
    Product in Inches (L x W x H): 5.5 x 8.25 x 1.0
    Walmart No.: 159308143

    About the author

    Biography of Wharton, Edith

    Edith Wharton was a woman of extreme contrasts; brought up to be a leisured aristocrat, she was also dedicated to her career as a writer. She wrote novels of manners about the old New York society from which she came, but her attitude was consistently critical. Her irony and her satiric touches, as well as her insight into human character, continue to appeal to readers today. As a child, Wharton found refuge from the demands of her mother's social world in her father's library and in making up stories.

    Her marriage at age 23 to Edward ("Teddy"). Wharton seemed to confirm her place in the conventional role of wealthy society woman, but she became increasingly dissatisfied with the "mundanities" of her marriage and turned to writing, which drew her into an intellectual community and strengthened her sense of self. After publishing two collections of short stories, The Greater Inclination (1899) and Crucial Instances (1901), she wrote her first novel, The Valley of Decision (1902), a long, historical romance set in eighteenth-century Italy.

    Her next work, the immensely popular The House of Mirth (1905), was a scathing criticism of her own "frivolous" New York society and its capacity to destroy her heroine, the beautiful Lily Bart. As Wharton became more established as a successful writer, Teddy's mental health declined and their marriage deteriorated. In 1907 she left America altogether and settled in Paris, where she wrote some of her most memorable stories of harsh New England rural life---Ethan Frome (1911) and Summer (1917)---as well as The Reef (1912), which is set in France.

    All describe characters forced to make moral choices in which the rights of individuals are pitted against their responsibilities to others. She also completed her most biting satire, The Custom of the Country (1913), the story of Undine Spragg's climb, marriage by marriage, from a midwestern town to New York to a French chateau. During World War I, Wharton dedicated herself to the war effort and was honored by the French government for her work with Belgian refugees.

    After the war, the world Wharton had known was gone. Even her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Age of Innocence (1920), a story set in old New York, could not recapture the former time. Although the new age welcomed her---Wharton was both a critical and popular success, honored by Yale University and elected to The National Institute of Arts and Letters---her later novels show her struggling to come to terms with a new era.

    In The Writing of Fiction (1925), Wharton acknowledged her debt to her friend Henry James, whose writings share with hers the descriptions of fine distinctions within a social class and the individual's burdens of making proper moral decisions. R.W.B. Lewis's biography of Wharton, published in 1975, along with a wealth of new biographical material, inspired an extensive reevaluation of Wharton. Feminist readings and reactions to them have focused renewed attention on her as a woman and as an artist. Although many of her books have recently been reprinted, there is still no complete collected edition of her work.

    Biography of Howard, Maureen

    Maureen Howard was born on June 28, 1930 in Bridgeport, Conn.. She graduated from Smith College in 1952 and immediately went to work in the publishing industry. She later taught at universities including the University of California at Santa Barbara and Columbia University. She has won numerous awards including a National Book Critics Circle award for general nonfiction in 1980, and a Guggenheim fellowship. Howard first gained attention in 1961 with the publication of Not a Word About Nightingales.

    In this work, a middle-class professor becomes disenchanted with his life and decides to remain in a small Italian village. In the course of the novel, his wife and daughter go through a process of self-discovery before settling back into a life of the routine and familiar. Howard's other novels also examine life-changing processes and the aftereffects.

    Chapter outline

    About This Seriesp. ix
    Introductionp. 1
    A Note on the Textp. 10
    The Age of Innocencep. 11
    Background Readingsp. 287
    Questions of Culturep. 289
    From "The Metropolitan Gentry: Culture against Politicsp. 289
    From "The Genteel Tradition in American Philosophyp. 294
    From "Democratic Vistasp. 300
    From "Merchants and Masterpieces: The Story of the Metropolitan Museum of Artp. 303
    The Location and Decoration of Houses in The Age of Innocencep. 318
    From How the Other Half Livesp. 332
    Marriage and Divorcep. 338
    From Domestic Revolutionsp. 338
    From "For the Wedding Nightp. 345
    Travel and Sportp. 348
    From the Introduction to American Travel Writers, 1850-1915p. 349
    From "Americans Abroadp. 355
    From "Newportp. 357
    From "The Lawn Setp. 359
    Anthropologyp. 364
    From Violence and the Sacredp. 364
    From Primitive Culturep. 366
    Other Writingsp. 369
    Writing The Age of Innocencep. 371
    The Ways of Old New Yorkp. 372
    The Childishness of American Womenp. 378
    The Valley of Childish Thingsp. 380
    Winning the Pulitizer Prizep. 381
    Critical Readingsp. 385
    From "The Composition of Edith Wharton's The Age of Innocencep. 387
    From "Cool Diana and the Blood-Red Muse: Edith Wharton on Innocence and Artp. 393
    From "Becoming the Mask: Edith Wharton's Ingenuesp. 404
    From "Angel of Devastation: Edith Wharton on the Arts of the Enslavedp. 408
    From "The Age of Innocence and the Bohemian Perilp. 411
    From "Edith Wharton: The Archeological Motivep. 414
    From "'Hunting for the Real': Wharton and the Science of Mannersp. 418
    From "A Note on Wharton's Use of Faustp. 430
    From "The Mind in Chains: Public Plots and Personal Fablesp. 432
    From "American Naturalism in Its 'Perfected' State: The Age of Innocence and An American Tragedyp. 434
    From "The Scorses Interview: On Filming The Age of Innocencep. 441
    Of Writers and Class: In Praise of Edith Whartonp. 448
    Works Citedp. 454
    For Further Readingp. 455

    Reviews

    Review by Library Journal (2008-04-01)

    A handful of Wharton's standards get the "Everyman's Library" upgrade. These are more expensive than paperback alternatives but still reasonably priced, and the hardcover quality is worth the extra bucks if you can afford it.

    Book description

    Age of Innocence, by Edith Wharton, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:
      All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.

      Winner of the 1921 Pulitzer Prize, The Age of Innocence is Edith Wharton’s masterful portrait of desire and betrayal during the sumptuous Golden Age of Old New York, a time when society people “dreaded scandal more than disease.”

      This is Newland Archer’s world as he prepares to marry the beautiful but conventional May Welland. But when the mysterious Countess Ellen Olenska returns to New York after a disastrous marriage, Archer falls deeply in love with her. Torn between duty and passion, Archer struggles to make a decision that will either courageously define his life—or mercilessly destroy it.

      Maureen Howard is a critic, teacher, and writer of fiction. Her seven novels include Bridgeport Bus, Natural History, and A Lover’s Almanac. Her memoir, Facts of Life, won the National Book Critics’ Circle Award. She has taught at Yale and Columbia University.

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