Federal Cartridge 5.56mmx45mm 62gr FMJ Ball-Clipped Ammo Can, 420 Rounds

This Item is no longer available
We're unable to show you buying options for this item.
Similar items available online

About this item

Important Made in USA Origin Disclaimer: For certain items sold by Walmart on Walmart.com, the displayed country of origin information may not be accurate or consistent with manufacturer information. For updated, accurate country of origin data, it is recommended that you rely on product packaging or manufacturer information.
Aim true with this Federal Cartridge Ammo Can.

About this item

Important Made in USA Origin Disclaimer: For certain items sold by Walmart on Walmart.com, the displayed country of origin information may not be accurate or consistent with manufacturer information. For updated, accurate country of origin data, it is recommended that you rely on product packaging or manufacturer information.

Aim true with this Federal Cartridge Ammo Can.


Federal Cartridge 5.56mmx45mm 62gr FMJ Ball-Clipped Ammo Can, 420 Rounds:

  • M19 ammo can
  • Model# XM855F1

Specifications

Caliber: 5.56 NATO
Number of Pieces: 420
Manufacturer Part Number: XM855F1 AC1
Model: XM855F1 AC1
Brand: Federal Ammunition
Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H): 12.00 x 6.10 x 7.50 IN
Show

Customer Q&A

Back
Questions & Answers 11 questions
1-3 of 11 questions

Ask a question

If you would like to share feedback with us about pricing, delivery or other customer service issues, please contact customer service directly.


Q&A tips and guidelines

Q&A Exchange Guidelines

When writing your question or answer, please follow these guidelines:

  • Do: Make sure your question is directly related to the product
  • Do: Be specific and provide as many details as possible
  • Do: Include the model number (if applicable)
  • Do: Write your question in English
  • Do Not: Include personal information (such as your full name)
  • All submitted questions and answers are subject to the terms set forth in our Terms and Conditions

We reserve the right not to post your question or answer if it contains any of the following:

  • Any information not related to the actual merchandise or topic
  • Obscenities, discriminatory language or other language not suitable for a public forum
  • Advertisements or “spam” content
  • Email addresses, physical addresses or other forms of contact information
  • Critical or spiteful comments on other questions or answers posted on the page or their authors
  • Any imagery that demonstrates incorrect use of the merchandise
  • Anything that Walmart deems to be inappropriate, at Walmart's discretion

Provide as many details as possible, including the model number (if applicable).

Remember: Don’t include personal information (such as your full name).


Preview Question

Thank you.

Questions will be checked against our question guidelines and posted within five to seven business days.

Back
by PinHead 12/30/2012
5 answers
  • A. As long as it's kept dry, it's pretty indefinite. Got some ammo from the 30's that still shoots great. It should be noted that modern quality ammo should be quite safe (as long as it's kept clean and dry) at least 100 years from now, while some ammo made before around 1950-1960 can be dangerous due to manufacturing inconsistencies, imperfections and or shoddy materials.
    by OLDSCRATCH412/10/2014
    Was this answer helpful? (3) (0)
    Was this answer helpful?
  • A. 25+ years
    by Iwantthisammo3/5/2014
    Was this answer helpful? (2) (0)
    Was this answer helpful?
  • A. As said earlier if it is packed in the M2A1 metal ammo cans with good seals the military uses. it is supposed to last indefinitely. Originally "Indefinite" meant 25 years but the military is still using ammo My mother made during world war 2. Keep in dry cool location. Former Munitions inspector.
    by GreedyGoat11/1/2013
    Was this answer helpful? (1) (0)
    Was this answer helpful?
  • A. Depends on the ammo. If i t is in a watertight ammo can, you can usually get 5 year on any ammo. If it is made MilDpec, then you can get 20 years.
    by ManagementConsultantCPA10/9/2015
    Was this answer helpful? (0) (10)
    Was this answer helpful?
  • A. World War II ammo still shoots good. Ammo will probably out live you.
    by Wallymartstuff12/10/2014
    Was this answer helpful? (11) (0)
    Was this answer helpful?
Back
Back
by graystar 2/22/2014
4 answers
  • A. There are more then one 5.56 bullet made but most are the same. 5.56 NATO = .223,.5.56mm x 45mm,5.56nato sometime people try to sound smarter or more in command of language ,jargon,like the live it perfect example .22 magnum or .22 Winchester magnum the same thing the odd stuff has names too and when someone refers to it read the box match up the physical objects because ammo is non refundable
    by Triggerhappiness12/11/2014
    Was this answer helpful? (0) (1)
    Was this answer helpful?
  • A. If you have a Wylde chamber, or your barrel is marked 5.56 x 45, then you can fire either .223 or 5.56. If you barrel is marked .223 it is UNSAFE to fire 5.56 because of the pressure. The brass will stick in your chamber and destroy the extractor.
    by James197712/10/2014
    Was this answer helpful? (1) (0)
    Was this answer helpful?
  • A. Answer 1. Not really...read below. Answer 2. Read below. 5.56 NATO vs .223 The 5.56×45mm NATO (official NATO nomenclature 5.56 NATO) is an intermediate cartridge developed in the United States and originally chambered in the M16 rifle. The comparison between .223 and 5.56 isn’t a new one, so there is a lot of discussion to weed through to learn about the two. Ultimately, because they originated from the same cartridge, they are very similar, but that does not mean that they are necessarily interchangeable. At a glance, the two rounds are indiscernible. Both rounds use a bullet of .224in in diameter and an overall length of 2.26in. In general, the external dimensions for the two calibers are identical. What’s more significant is the pressure of the two rounds and the difference in the rifle chambering. One of the problems with comparing these two cartridges is that they utilize different methods of measuring pressure. SAAMI (Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute) measures the .223 pressure at the center of the casing, whereas the NATO standard measures the pressure at the throat (or leade) of the chamber. To rectify the two different methods, several have undertaken experiments with their own standardized recording method to compare “apples to apples.” Research confirms that, generally, shooting .223 through a 5.56 chamber results in lower pressure, but still functions (safely). Firing 5.56 through a .223 chamber, however, results in somewhat higher pressures. Although the differences aren’t massive (~5% in the previously referenced study), extensive firing of 5.56 through a .223 chamber could lead to over-pressure malfunctions, such as popped primers or blown cartridge case heads and other firearm malfunctions. The most important difference between .223 and 5.56 chambers is the length of the throat (or leade) for each chamber. More specifically, the leade is located at the mouth of the barrel before the rifling occurs. Comparing the NATO and SAAMI regulations, the leade for 5.56 chambers is nearly twice as long as that of a .223 chamber (.162in to .085in, respectively). If a 5.56 round contacts the barrel rifling too early, it can cause pressure spikes (leading to malfunction, and potentially damage) in the chamber. This explains why it is safe to fire .223 through a 5.56 chamber, but not recommended to fire 5.56 through a .223 chamber. As with so many elements of making a firearm purchase, the “right” option is subjective. If all you intend to purchase are .223 Remington rounds, there is nothing wrong with getting a rifle chambered for .223. However, if you want the option of firing milspec 5.56 through your rifle, you may prefer picking up a 5.56 chambered rifle. After all, you can still fire the .223 through it, safely, if you want. Price and personal preference are also factors to consider when making that decision. What works for you?
    by TexasMarksman6/28/2016
    Was this answer helpful? (18) (0)
    Was this answer helpful?
  • A. the .223 is slightly sorter of a round. SLIGHTLY. usually the 556 is a stronger round. if you have a .223 upper on your AR, some people will say that the 556 round will build up a little extra pressure due to the fact that the round actually touches the rifling before it is ignited. This creates a little extra friction or resistance when fired. There has never been a report of actual damaged caused by a 223 firing a 556 round. Overall they are the same.
    by justwishingforsome6/28/2016
    Was this answer helpful? (2) (5)
    Was this answer helpful?
1-3 of 11 questions See all
1-3 of 11 questions

Policies & Plans

See any care plans, options and policies that may be associated with this product.

Gifting plans

Gift options are not available for this item.

Pricing policy

About our prices
We’re committed to providing low prices every day, on everything. So if you find a current lower price from an online retailer on an identical, in-stock product, tell us and we’ll match it. See more details at Online Price Match.