Ten-Gallon War: The NFL's Cowboys, the AFL's Texans, and the Feud for Dallas's Pro Football Future

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Ten-Gallon War: The NFL's Cowboys, the AFL's Texans, and the Feud for Dallas's Pro Football Future

Format:  Hardcover,

308 pages

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Publish Date: Oct 2012

ISBN-13: 9780547435503

ISBN-10: 0547435509

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Book Information

The following content was provided by the publisher.
In the 1960s, on the heels of the "Greatest Game Ever Played," professional football began to flourish across the country--except in Texas, where college football was still the only game in town. But in an unlikely series of events, two young oil tycoons started their own professional football franchises in Dallas the very same year: the NFL's Dallas Cowboys, and, as part of a new upstart league designed to thwart the NFL's hold on the game, the Dallas Texans of the AFL. Almost overnight, a bitter feud was born.
The team owners, Lamar Hunt and Clint Murchison, became Mad Men of the gridiron, locked in a battle for the hearts and minds of the Texas pigskin faithful. Their teams took each other to court, fought over players, undermined each other's promotions, and rooted like hell for the other guys to fail. A true visionary, Hunt of the Texans focused on the fans, putting together a team of local legends and hiring attractive women to drive around town in red convertibles selling tickets. Meanwhile, Murchison and his Cowboys focused on the game, hiring a young star, Tom Landry, in what would be his first-ever year as a head coach, and concentrating on holding their own against the more established teams in the NFL. Ultimately, both teams won the battle, but only one got to stay in Dallas and go on to become one of sports' most quintessential franchises--"America's Team."
In this highly entertaining narrative, rich in colorful characters and unforgettable stunts, Eisenberg recounts the story of the birth of pro football in Dallas--back when the game began to be part of this country's DNA.

Specifications

Author:
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publish Date: Oct 2012
ISBN-13: 9780547435503
ISBN-10: 0547435509
Format: Hardcover
Number of Pages: 308
Shipping Weight (in pounds): 1.15
Product in Inches (L x W x H): 6.3 x 1.3 x 9.1

Reviews

Review by Library Journal (2012-08-01)

Former Baltimore Sun sports columnist Eisenberg's best book, Cotton Bowl Days (1997), was a memoir of his growing up a Cowboys fan in 1960s Dallas. This volume returns to the first three years of that decade when the Cowboys of the NFL and the Texans of the AFL vied for the city's then-limited interest in pro football. When it was proposed that the two teams play a game to determine who leaves town, some wags joked that the loser should be forced to stay. Ultimately, Lamar Hunt's AFL champion Texans moved to Kansas City to become the Chiefs in 1963, ceding Dallas to the 'Boys. Through extensive interviews, a Texas-sized territorial war over players, fans, and facilities is vividly relived.

Verdict: Concisely and affectionately told, this delightful book should appeal to all football fans.

(c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book description

By 1960 pro football was flourishing across the country—except in Texas, where college football still ruled. When two young oil tycoons started their own pro football franchises in Dallas that very same year—the NFL's Dallas Cowboys and the Dallas Texans of the newly formed AFL—a bitter feud was born. Like gunslingers in the Old West, these conniving Mad Men of the gridiron knew their hometown wasn't big enough for the both of them.

The Cowboys and Texans filed lawsuits against each other, fought over players, undermined each other's promotional ventures, and rooted like hell for the other guys to fail. The Texans' visionary owner, Lamar Hunt, focused on the fans, putting together a team of local legends and hiring attractive women to drive around town in red convertibles selling tickets. Meanwhile the Cowboys, led by a young Tom Landry in his first year as head coach, focused on winning games and holding their own in the NFL. Ultimately, both teams won the battle, but only one got to stay in Dallas and become "America's Team". In this highly entertaining narrative, rich in colorful characters and unforgettable stunts, John Eisenberg recounts the story of the birth of pro football in Dallas and throughout Texas—and the early moments when the game began to be part of this country's DNA.

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